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Uploaded on Saturday 05 Oct 2013 by Peter Prokosch

Hot spring as being found at many places on Iceland

Year: 2013
From collection: Iceland's "Green Economy"
Taken by: Peter Prokosch
Geothermal energy is thermal energy generated and stored in the Earth. The geothermal energy of the Earth's crust originates from the original formation of the planet (20%) and from radioactive decay of minerals (80%). The geothermal gradient, which is the difference in temperature between the core of the planet and its surface, drives a continuous conduction of thermal energy in the form of heat from the core to the surface. From hot springs, geothermal energy has been used for bathing since Paleolithic times and for space heating since ancient Roman times, but it is now better known for electricity generation, as happening on Iceland and could contribute to a greener economy. Worldwide, 11,400 megawatts (MW) of geothermal power is online in 24 countries in 2012. Geothermal power is cost effective, reliable, sustainable, and environmentally friendly, but has historically been limited to areas near tectonic plate boundaries. Geothermal power has the potential to help mitigate global warming if widely deployed in place of fossil fuels. The Earth's geothermal resources are theoretically more than adequate to supply humanity's energy needs, but only a very small fraction may be profitably exploited.
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