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Counting women’s labor Counting women’s labor
Besides housekeeping and child rearing, women and girls are usually responsible for fetching water and fuel wood. Women and girls tend to perform tasks such as planting, transplanting, hand weeding, harvesting, picking fruit and vegetables, small livestock rearing, and post-harvest operations such as threshing, seed selection, and storage, while mechanized work (preparing the land, irrigation, mechanical harvesting, and marketing) is generally a ...
03 Jan 2008 - by Ketill Berger
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Trade in illegal wood products and corruption Trade in illegal wood products and corruption
Where government officials are keen to keep an eye shut for a share of the profits, the more the forests suffer. About 5 billion USD per year is estimated to be lost due to uncollected taxes and royalties on legally sanctioned timber harvests due to corruption. Other forests are falling while the responsible officers look the other way. A majority of the illegal timber comes from Asia, with China and Indonesia as the main sources.
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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The importance of small forestry enterprises in developing countries The importance of small forestry enterprises in developing countries
It is estimated that exported timber only represents 5 per cent of the wood cut in tropical forests. 10 per cent is timber used locally and the majority - 85 per cent- of wood is for fuel. While exports are generally the preserve of large scale enterprises, the domestic market is dominated by small forest enterprises. In many countries the forest sector constitutes mainly small forest enterprises - employing from 10 to 100 full-time employees. Th...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Natural resource - solar power (potential) Natural resource - solar power (potential)
More than two billion people cannot access affordable energy services today. They depend on inefficient locally collected and often unprocessed biomass-based fuels, such as crop residues, wood, and animal dung. Because convenient, affordable energy can contribute to a household’s productivity and income generating potential, its availability can help families and communities break out of the cycle of poverty. At the same time it also provides gro...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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