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Sea Ice Anomaly in Northern Hemisphere Sea Ice Anomaly in Northern Hemisphere
Arctic sea-ice reductions have significant impacts on climate, wildlife and communities. The opening of open water across the Arctic ocean will have unknown consequences in terms of changes in water circulation and redistribution of species from the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. As sea ice coverage declines, albedo diminishes and more radiation is absorbed by the sea water, in a feed-back process that enhances warming and melting sea ice.
06 Oct 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Tourism Tourism
Sumatran orangutan habitat offers excellent opportunities for tourism, including direct viewing of orangutans and other diverse wildlife, jungle treks and caving, rafting and bathing in rivers and hot springs, and even unspoilt sandy beaches where the forest meets the sea.
13 Sep 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Land cover change in Batang Toru Land cover change in Batang Toru
Migration from the island of Nias to the West Batang Toru forests over the last two decades has been largely spontaneous. These settlers have opened up primary forests for agriculture and hunt many species of local wildlife, including orangutans. Currently at least eight Nias communities have been established inside the protected forest in the Batang Toru area, leading to the loss of more than 2,200 ha of orangutan forest habitat in specifically ...
13 Sep 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Migratory routes for selected marine animals Migratory routes for selected marine animals
Acknowledging ecological networks and how their disruption may have an impact populations of migratory species is essential for the survival of these species and for fostering international collaboration. This is an overview of migratory routes for selected marine animals.
15 Nov 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Iron mine threats Beluga in Ban Island Iron mine threats Beluga in Ban Island
A large iron mine, operated by the Baffinland Iron Mines Corporation, has now been proposed in Baffin Island, with possibly severe impacts on wildlife on the island, such as development across the calving grounds of the caribou, and the establishment of two major ports. A 149 kilometres railway is planned, 100 kilometres of roads, 83 quarries (producing ca. 29,500,000 tons), and in an operation phase with an estimated traffic of 110 trucks per da...
15 Nov 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Highway threaten Serengeti wildlife Highway threaten Serengeti wildlife
This graph shows proposed commercial roads across the Serengeti and surrounding region in 2010. However, following intense international pressure, the Tanzanian Government announced in 2011 that it will favour an alternative route to the South, outside the park. Some projections suggest that if the road were built, numbers may fall to less than 300,000 (Dobson and Borner, 2010), others that the herd could decline by a third (Holdo et al., 2011), ...
15 Nov 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Cheetah and Wildebeest in East Africa Cheetah and Wildebeest in East Africa
Protecting the Cheetah’s range also benefits other migratory wildlife, including those not currently protected by international agreements such as Appendix I of the CMS. The Serengeti- Mara-Tsavo landscape, for example, is home not only to a globally important population of Cheetahs, but also to vast numbers of migratory Wildebeest, Zebra, Eland and Thomson’s Gazelle. In 2011, the Tanzanian government ensured that the proposed commercial road n...
08 Mar 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Lesser White-fronted Goose migratory routes in Eurasiah Lesser White-fronted Goose migratory routes in Eurasiah
The globally threatened Lesser White-fronted Goose is a Palearctic migrant, breeding discontinuously in forest- or shrub tundra and mountainous shrubby wetlands from Fennoscandia to easternmost Russia. The species has declined rapidly since the 1950s leading to a fragmentation of its breeding range. Many key stop-over and wintering sites are still unknown. Today, three distinct wild sub-populations remain, of which the two Western Palearc...
15 Nov 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Migratory species – flying in the air Migratory species – flying in the air
Acknowledging ecological networks and how their disrup-tion may have an impact populations of migratory species is essential for the survival of these species and for fostering international collaboration. This is an overview of selected migratory routes for birds.
15 Nov 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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The long migration of the Humpback Whale The long migration of the Humpback Whale
Humpback annual migrations between feeding grounds in polar waters to mating and calving grounds in tropical waters are amongst the longest of any mammal. Following heavy exploitation during much of the 19th and 20th centuries, Humpback Whales have been legally protected from commercial whaling since 1966, except for aboriginal and subsistence take, and in most areas their populations are showing signs of recovery. However, there is little evid...
15 Nov 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Migratory species – running on land Migratory species – running on land
Acknowledging ecological networks and how their disruption may have an impact populations of migratory species is essential for the survival of these species and for fostering international collaboration. This is an overview of selected migratory ranges for ungulates.
15 Nov 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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