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The bushmeat chain reaction The bushmeat chain reaction
The illicit bushmeat trade involves a series of underlying socio-economic factors, but leads, with rising population densities, to local depletions of wildlife species, and increasingly inside protected areas.
19 Jun 2014 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID Arendal
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Environmental crime network Environmental crime network
The opportunities ecosystems provide for future development are threatened by serious and increasingly sophisticated transnational organized environmental crime. This includes illegal logging, poaching and trafficking of a wide range of animals, illegal fisheries, illegal mining and dumping of toxic waste. It is a rapidly rising threat to the environment, to revenues from natural resources, to state security and to sustainable development. Combin...
19 Jun 2014 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID Arendal
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Sub-Saharan Africa conflicts and the elephant range Sub-Saharan Africa conflicts and the elephant range
Approximately 19,000 elephants are located within or very near conflict zones in countries with civil wars or significant unrest and armed non-state groups. Up to a maximum 15% of elephant populations are killed annually in or very near conflict zones (ca. 2,850 elephants). An estimated 100,000 elephants are located within a 500 km striking range of such areas of which approximately 5,000 elephants are killed. Within and near conflict zones non-s...
19 Jun 2014 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID Arendal
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Number of species in IUCN Red List categories from Mediterranean countries Number of species in IUCN Red List categories from Mediterranean countries
Mediterranean species and habitats face a number of pressures from human activities, including over-exploitation; degradation of critical habitats; invasive alien species; pollution, including excess nutrients, toxic pollutants, and litter; and the use of non-selective fishery gear (e.g., drift nets and purse seine nets) (UNEP/ MAP/MED POL 2005). While there is no evidence of species loss in the Mediterranean, the status of a number of speci...
19 Nov 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Threatened species in Zimbabwe Threatened species in Zimbabwe
Through the intensified conservation programmes, including the Communal Areas Management Programme for Indigenous Resources (CAMPFIRE), the number of threatened species was reduced from 38 in 2000 to 32 in 2004. CAMPFIRE is a community-based natural resource management programme in which Rural District Councils, on behalf of communities on communal land, are granted the authority to market wildlife in their district to safari operators who then s...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Threatened species in Tanzania Threatened species in Tanzania
Tanzania is a large country with vast biological diversity and high numbers of threatened species,well documented. According to IUCN (2008), Tanzania has 10 008 known species of higher plants including endemic and non-endemic, out of which 235 (2.9 per cent) are threatened. Of the 316 known mammal species 42 are threatened (excluding marine mammals). There are 229 known breeding bird species out of which 33 are threatened (excluding those that mi...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Historical decline of the Caspian seal (Pusa caspica) Historical decline of the Caspian seal (Pusa caspica)
It is unclear how many seals remain in the Caspian Sea. From a population estimated at more than one million in the early years of the twentieth century, population estimates now vary between 110 000 and 350 000. For more than 100 years, hunting of seal pups was carried out in the frozen North Caspian area each winter. In the early twentieth century, nearly 100 000 seals were hunted each year; later a quota was set at 40,000 pups per year, furt...
17 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Biodiversity loss: state and scenarios 2006 and 2050 Biodiversity loss: state and scenarios 2006 and 2050
These projections of biodiversity loss from 2000 to 2050 were produced by the GLOBIO consortium for UNEP's Global Environment Outlook 4. Across the GEO scenarios and regions, global biodiversity continues to be threatened, with strong implications for ecosystem services and human well-being. All regions continue to experience declines in terrestrial biodiversity in each of the scenarios. The greatest losses are seen in Markets First, followed by ...
26 Jan 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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The economy of legal wildlife trade The economy of legal wildlife trade
The trade in wild species can contribute significantly to rural incomes, and the effect upon local economies can be substantial. The high value of wildlife products and derivatives can also provide positive economic incentives to provide an alternative to other land use options for the local people - to protect wild species and their habitats, and to maintain the resource for sustainable and profitable use in the medium and long term. Consequent...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Status of terrestrial ecoregions - threats and vulnerabilities Status of terrestrial ecoregions - threats and vulnerabilities
In a World Wildlife Fund for Nature (WWF) study, experts identified 200 periority terrestrial ecoregions - defined as large scale ecological systems with characteristic flora, fauna and climate with high priority for conservation. Furthermore, as presented in this map, the 200 ecoregions were ranked based on their current and future threats and conservation status. From the study - 47% of the terrestrial ecorgions are considered critical or endan...
01 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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