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Hydropower potential (theoretical possitibility for electricity generation) Hydropower potential (theoretical possitibility for electricity generation)
xHydropower, generating electricity through turbines, represents a clean and renewable energy source, but not without problems. Dams and reservoirs disrupt the natural flow, and may increase siltation and evaporation, in addition to severe impacts for wildlife, for instance migrating fish. The gross theoretical capability, presented in this map, represents a calculation based on the topography and precipitation in the countries, and is the amount...
20 Jul 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Dobris+3: overall pan-european assessment Dobris+3: overall pan-european assessment
The graph shows Dobris+3: overall pan-european assessment. It describes positive or negative developments within various environmental branches, such as climate change, biodiversity and urban environment, the occurence of environmental policies as well as the principal drivers of said environmental developments.
13 Feb 2006 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Preliminary assessment of the Amazonian region Preliminary assessment of the Amazonian region
Poster that was prepared as a proof of concept in the development of the GLOBIO2 model. The greater Amazonian region is a giant mega watershed with many remote areas with very little development and this area harbours a massive amount of water resources for the population in the densily inhabited areas downstream, as well as areas of very high and unique biodiversity.
26 Jan 2006 - by Maren Aschehoug, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Money grows on trees - direct values from community management in Tanzania Money grows on trees - direct values from community management in Tanzania
In an effort to bring back life to the degraded and over-used lands of the poor Shinyanga region of Tanzania, the government has brought back the traditional practice of Ngitili. Vegetation and trees are nurtured in enclosures and managed through the community. The practice initiative has been a success, through education, guidance and empowerment of local institutions. Not only are there benefits from the grown products, depicted in this figure,...
20 Sep 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Reference map for the city of Malindi, Kenya Reference map for the city of Malindi, Kenya
This map locates the city of Malindi (population approximatly 150 000 inhabitants) in Kenya. The city is located on the Kenyan coast, on the Indian Ocean. The map also displays a world map for further reference, as well as other reference points, such as the location of Nairobi and Mombasa.
20 Sep 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Energy consumption, economic development and CO2 emissions; selected Latin America countries Energy consumption, economic development and CO2 emissions; selected Latin America countries
As a rule of thumb, economic growth is closely related to growth in energy consumption because the more energy is used, the higher the economic growth. However, it is possible to decouple energy consumption and economic growth to some extent.. More efficient use of energy may entail economic growth and a reduction in energy use. Energy efficiency may very well be an economic driving force. With an increasing use of sustainable energy sources, th...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Quick retreat of the Santa Rosa glacier, Peru Quick retreat of the Santa Rosa glacier, Peru
Several mountain glaciers now disappear at a frightening rate as in the Santa Rosa glacier of Peru. A warmer climate often leads to increased precipitation. Much of the increased precipitation comes as rain instead of snow, mostly in the winter and to a lesser extent during the autumn and the spring. The winter rains fall over existing snow, causing increased melting. As the ice and snow cover is reduced, the albedo of the area is reduced as we...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Sites visited in Macedonia by the Task Force (UNEP) Sites visited in Macedonia by the Task Force (UNEP)
The grapic shows all the sites the UNEP Task Force visited in Macedonia. Macedonia is part of the Balkans, bordering on Albania, Bulgaria, former Yugoslavia, Serbia and Greece. The graphic is part of the balkan task force' goal to provide and review information on potential and real environmental impacts, as well as those on human settlements, stemming from the ongoing conflict in the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (FRY) and neighbouring countrie...
11 Feb 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Refugees and displaced people from the former Yugoslavia since 1991 Refugees and displaced people from the former Yugoslavia since 1991
All the states that emerged from the break-up of Yugoslavia are still fragile, except Slovenia, which joined the EU in 2004, and Croatia, which is well on the way towards European integration. There have been nearly 800,000 people who have left the former Yugoslavia since 1991.
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Population displacements 1991 to 2001 Population displacements 1991 to 2001
All the states that emerged from the break-up of Yugoslavia are still fragile, except Slovenia, which joined the EU in 2004, and Croatia, which is well on the way towards European integration. Since the Dayton Peace Agreement (1995), Bosnia and Herzegovina has constituted a state, but split into two entities: the Republic of Srpska and the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, itself divided into 10 cantons.
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Waste and car production Waste and car production
The life cycle approach gives a more complete picture of the waste and energy associated with a product. Our daily choices determine the amount of waste we produce. As consumers, our relationship to a product happens only during a short phase of its existence. This chart reflects the waste material during car production, as well as the distribution of material in a typical car.
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Ability of countries to support their citizens from their own environment Ability of countries to support their citizens from their own environment
The Ecological Footprint measures the amount of productive land area needed to support a nation’s consumption and waste. This indicator shows that in many countries, as well as for the planet as a whole, the demand for natural resources, or the 'ecological capacity', exceeds the amount available. Countries that are not able to support their national consumption with their own natural resources are running at an 'ecological deficit'. Therefore the...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Percentage of the population served by municipal waste services Percentage of the population served by municipal waste services
Waste collection is a basic public service performed for everyone in OECD countries. Everyone? Well, a closer look reveals that this is not the case for a significant number of people. If these developed countries can’t collect all their waste, imagine the situation in many developing countries, where resources are much scarcer and access is sometimes problematic. This graphic presents the situation in selected OECD countries, highlighting a numb...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Radioactive, chemical and biological hazards in Central Asia Radioactive, chemical and biological hazards in Central Asia
The Soviet development model for Central Asia was based on building large-scale irrigation schemes enabling the region to become a major cotton producer and expanding the mining and processing industry. Industrial operations in the region paid little attention to the environment and public health, resulting in the accumulation of pollutants in the local environment. Today, not only active industrial facilities constitute a threat to environment, ...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Soil polluting activities from selected sources Soil polluting activities from selected sources
Contaminants in the soil can harm plants when they take up the contamination through their roots. Ingesting, inhaling, or touching contaminated soil, as well as eating plants or animals that have accumulated soil contaminants can adversely impact the health of humans and animals.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Human Development Index for the World regions in 1994 Human Development Index for the World regions in 1994
The UNDP Human Development Index (HDI) is a comparative benchmark indicator of living standards and development, taking into account poverty, literacy, education, life expectancy, childbirth, and other factors for countries worldwide. It is a standard means of measuring well-being, especially child welfare.
28 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Access to safe drinking water Access to safe drinking water
There are currently more than 1000 million people in the world that lacks access to an easily accessible and safe water source, such as a connection to water mains or a protected well. Instead, water access is limited or available through unprotected sources. The target, under the Millennium Development Goals, is to halve, by 2015, the proportion of people without sustainable access to safe drinking water and sanitation.
28 Sep 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Number of trees planted, world map - UNEP Billion Tree Campaign, May 2008 Number of trees planted, world map - UNEP Billion Tree Campaign, May 2008
The UNEP Billion Tree Campaign represents a unique worldwide tree planting initiative, aimed at empowering citizens to corporations and people up to presidents to embrace the climate change challenge. By 2008, 18 months since the launch of the initiative, the campaign has managed to catalyze the planting of two billion trees, double its original target. The campaign, spearheaded by the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) and the World Agroforestry Ce...
28 Sep 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Benefits from marine and coastal ecosystems and activities Benefits from marine and coastal ecosystems and activities
Besides the well-known economic value of fisheries, there are several other activities generating significant revenues in coastal and marine areas. This graphic discusses the economic benefits of coastal tourism, trade and shipping, offshore oil and gas, and fisheries. It also illustrates the estimated mean value of marine biomes such as estuaries and coastal reefs.
17 May 2005 - by Delphine Digout, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Indications of structural changes in the marine ecosystem, catch ratios of predatory and plankton feeding fish Indications of structural changes in the marine ecosystem, catch ratios of predatory and plankton feeding fish
Three-quarters of fish stocks are currently exploited to the maximum extent, if not excessively. The Northeast Atlantic Ocean continues to exhibit declining catches, as well as a shift towards fish at lower levels in the food chain. This graphic illustrates the decline in the catch ratios of predatory and plankton-feeding fish in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean from 1950 to 1995.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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