HomeAboutActivitiesMapsPhotosPublicationsNews
 
Home >> Water consumption

Tag: Water consumption

Population using improved water sources in Namibia Population using improved water sources in Namibia
Access by urban households to safe drinking water is slightly less than 100 per cent, but decreasing. Access of rural households to safe drinking water was 88 per cent in 2008, up from 67 per cent in 2000. The government has improved water supply to rural communities through the provision of new boreholes and the rehabilitation of existing boreholes, as well as the development of pipelines. Namibia recycles water, especially in urban areas. This...
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
3
Population using improved drinking water sources in Botswana Population using improved drinking water sources in Botswana
Due to deliberate policy and strategic action, Botswana is in the envious position of having met its water and sanitation targets well before the MDG targets and the timelines for its own Vision 2016. More than 90 per cent of the population in urban and rural areas has access to drinking water and sanitation.
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
3
Freshwater availability per capita in Zambezi River Basin countries Freshwater availability per capita in Zambezi River Basin countries
The water flow in the Zambezi river is estimated at 3 600 cu m per second. This represents about 87 mm/year of equivalent rainfall and less than 10 per cent of the average rainfall in the basin (Shela 2000). The average annual rainfall in the basin is about 950 mm/year (Mitchell 2004), but is unevenly distributed across the basin. The southern and western parts of the basin receive less rainfall than the northern and eastern parts. The more den...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
3
Trends in water consumption and evaporation Trends in water consumption and evaporation
Throughout the 20th century, global water use has increased in the agricultural, domestic and industrial sectors. Evaporation from reservoirs has increased at a slower rate. Projections indicate that both global water use and evaporation will continue to increase. This graphic compares industrial and domestic water consumption as a whole with evaporation from reservoirs, in cubic kilometres per year. The time period covered is 1900 to 2010 (asses...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Trends and forecasts in water use, by sector Trends and forecasts in water use, by sector
Throughout the 20th century, global water use has increased in the agricultural, domestic and industrial sectors. Evaporation from reservoirs has increased at a slower rate. Projections indicate that both global water use and evaporation will continue to increase. This graphic shows water consumption, withdrawal and waste, in cubic kilometres per year, for the agricultural, domestic and industrial sectors, and shows evaporation from reservoirs. T...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
5
Total bottled water consumption Total bottled water consumption
Why would any country import goods already produced at home or nearby? One explanation is straight forward: It may be cheaper to buy abroad than produce locally or the necessary know-how is not available locally. In some cases a famous brand or the country of origin is a guarantee of quality.
15 Dec 2006 - by Emmanuelle Bournay
4
Areas of physical and economic water scarcity Areas of physical and economic water scarcity
Under current water use practices, increases in population and changes in diet are projected to increase water consumption in food and fiber production by 70-90%. If demands for biomass energy increase, this may aggravate the problem. In addition, sectoral competition for water resources will intensify, further exacerbating the stress on developing country producers.
03 Jan 2008 - by Unknown
4
Projected changes in cereal productivity in Africa, due to climate change – current climate to 2080 Projected changes in cereal productivity in Africa, due to climate change – current climate to 2080
Water is essential not only to survival but is also equally or even more important than nutrients in food production. Agriculture accounts for nearly 70% of the water consumption, with some estimates as high as 85% (Hanasaki et al., 2008a,b). Water scarcity will affect over 1.8 billion people by 2025 (WHO, 2007). This could have major impacts on health, particularly in rural areas, and thus also major impacts on farmer productivity. Althoug...
02 Feb 2009 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Water withdrawal and consumption: the big gap Water withdrawal and consumption: the big gap
Freshwater use by continents is partly based on several socio-economic development factors, including population, physiographic, and climatic characteristics. Analysis indicates that: - Annual global freshwater withdrawal has grown from 3,790 km3 (of which consumption accounted for 2,070 km3 or 61%) in 1995, to 4,430 km3 (of which consumption accounted for 2,304 km3 or 52%) in 2000 (Shiklomanov, 1999). - In 2000, about 57% of the world’s freshw...
26 Jan 2009 - by Phillipe Rekacewicz, February 2008
3