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Tag: Waste management

Waste management hierarchy
Greening the waste sector refers to a shift from less-preferred waste treatment and disposal methods such as incineration (without energy recovery) and different forms of landfilling towards the “three Rs”: Reduce, Reus...
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
Pacific regional waste composition
Waste management in SIDS, as in other developing countries, is a growing problem because of population growth, urbanisation, changing consumption patterns and the large numbers of tourists. Most of the waste collected i...
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
Solid waste management cost for selected cities
As garbage piles up, however much space we set aside for landfill, we are beginning to realise that producing waste at this rate is no longer viable. It is time for the three “Rs”: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle and integrated w...
15 Dec 2006 - by Emmanuelle Bournay
Landfilling and incinerating still leading in Europe
As the garbage pile gets higher and the environmental conscience sharpens, it is now recognized that producing waste at this rate is no longer acceptable. Now is the time for “integrated waste management” and its motto –...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Different approaches and overlapping definitions to waste
Waste is generated in all sorts of ways. Its composition and volume largely depend on consumption patterns and the industrial and economic structures in place. Air quality, water and soil contamination, space consumption...
14 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Emissions due to solid waste disposal on land
Landfi ling is the most common waste management practice, and results in the release of methane from the anaerobic decomposition of organic materials. Methane is around 20 times more potent as a GHG than carbon dioxide. ...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Solid waste management cost for selected cities
Sound waste management requires a high level of technology and a signif cant budget. What Japan and Germany can afford today, most countries will have to wait a long time for. Developed countries have a lot to learn fro...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Municipal solid waste generation for selected large cities in Asia
Municipal waste is everything collected and treated by municipalities. Only part of it is comes from households, the rest is generated by small businesses, commercial and other municipal activities. So it is produced fro...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
What is in a Swiss rubbish bag? (household waste)
The amount and composition of municipal waste depends on a variety of factors. It is related to our living standard but wealth does not explain everything. It is also correlated with levels of urbanization, energy choice...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Contribution of various waste management systems to greenhouse gas emissions, 2002
The disposal and treatment of waste can produce emissions of several greenhouse gases (GHGs), which contribute to global climate change. The most significant GHG gas produced from waste is methane. It is released during ...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
The richer we get, the more we discard - human consumption, waste and living standards
According to various scenarios, the economic development (presented in this graphic as Gross Domestic Product, GDP) will most likely continue for the next decades – but at a slower pace for those countries that can affor...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Hungary, topographic map
Hungary is located in Central Europe, northwest of Romania, comprising of 93,030 sq km. It has a population of 10,006,835 (2005). Major environmental concerns are: the upgrading of Hungary's standards in waste management...
17 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Heftingsdalen shipping area
At the entrance to the plant, which covers more than 15 hectares, a sign announces:“Compost, bark and wood shavings for sale”. Other waste is separated, packed and redirected to logistics centres elsewhere in Norway and...
15 Dec 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz
Waste collection in Curitiba
In the 1980s severe hygienic problems plagued parts of Curitiba where housing development was uncontrolled. The winding streets were too narrow for council trucks and waste rotting in the open caused disease. In 1989 ...
15 Dec 2006 - by Cécile Marin
Packaging waste production per capita in Europe
The manufacture of packaging itself generates waste and by defi nition it has a particularly short lifespan. It turns into waste as soon as its contents reaches its destination. This is certainly a blessing for the packa...
15 Dec 2006 - by Emmanuelle Bournay
Typical hazardous wastes generated by selected manufacturing industries
Industry is the top producer of waste in developed countries. A large proportion of industrial waste is hazardous, because industrial processes often involve chemicals. Cleaner production – reducing the amount of problem...
15 Dec 2006 - by Emmanuelle Bournay
Household waste and recycling in England
In 1999, the British consultant BioRegional thought up an innovative way of dealing with waste paper. Surely offices could sort their own paper and, after local reprocessing, reuse it? Local Paper for London now recycles...
15 Dec 2006 - by Emmanuelle Bournay
A history of waste management
A visual timeline of historical waste manaement. From the first recorded landfill created in Knossos in 3000 B.C. to the English parliament banning waste disposal in public waterways and ditches in 1388 to the establishm...
15 Dec 2006 - by Diana Rizzolio, Emmanuelle Bournay
Heftingsdalen, Norway
The plant is designed to restrict waste movement and environmental damage. Strict safety regulations govern storage of hazardous waste (chemicals, asbestos, varnish, oil, etc.). Such waste is not moved until it is destro...
15 Dec 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz
Methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions in Latin America and the Caribbean
In addition to carbon dioxide (CO2), other greenhouse gasses that play an important role in the region are methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). These gasses are produced primarily in the sectors of waste management, mi...
22 Nov 2010 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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