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Reindeer herding - vegetation impacts (Norway and Finland) Reindeer herding - vegetation impacts (Norway and Finland)
A very high-resolution false color Ikonos-2 satellite image of Jauristunturit in the border zone shared by Norway and Finland. Image acquired 28 June 2001. The main vegetation type is lichen dominated tundra heath with dwarf shrubs. The difference in whiteness is due to lichen coverage, and the national border with reindeer fence visibly divides the area. The northern portion is Norway, where fruticose lichen coverage is higher. This is a consequ...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
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Trends in Arctic vegetation productivity 1982-2005 (Greening of the Arctic) Trends in Arctic vegetation productivity 1982-2005 (Greening of the Arctic)
Arctic vegetation has undergone enormous change in the past, most notably in response to the glacial and interglacial periods of the Quaternary. Data from many sources and at several scales suggest that recent climate change is already affecting terrestrial Arctic ecosystems. Comparisons of historical and contemporary aerial photographs provide evidence that Arctic vegetation has already undergone significant shifts in recent decades, foreshadowi...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
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Arctic terrestrial species trends 1970-2005 (ASTI) Arctic terrestrial species trends 1970-2005 (ASTI)
Dramatic changes, such as sea ice loss, are projected to occur in Arctic ecosystems over the next century. Understanding how the Arctic’s living resources, including its vertebrate species, are responding to these changes is essential in order to develop effective conservation and adaptation strategies. Arctic species that are adapted to these extreme environments are expected to be displaced, in part, by the encroachment of more southerly specie...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
3
Distribution and trends of wild Rangifer in the Arctic Distribution and trends of wild Rangifer in the Arctic
Distribution and observed trends of wild Rangifer populations throughout the circumpolar Arctic (from The Circum Arctic Rangifer Monitoring and Assessment Network, CARMA). Note: Wild boreal forest reindeer have not been mapped by CARMA and thus are not represented here. Currently wild reindeer and caribou have declined by about 33% since populations (herds) peaked in the 1990s and early 2000s (3.8 million compared to 5.6 million) which followed ...
01 May 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Vegetation and land cover in the Arctic Vegetation and land cover in the Arctic
The land mass in the Arctic - Greenland and parts of Canada, Alaska, Russia and the Nordic countries - surrounds the Arctic Ocean. In the low Arctic, down to the temperate regions, the taiga coniferous forests represents a vast band of deep forests. North of the taiga, the tundra of the Arctic - with low vegetation, shrubs and various degrees of permafrosts spreads out. Beyond the tundra, there might be barren regions with only rock and few plant...
13 Oct 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Arctic, topography and bathymetry Arctic, topography and bathymetry
The Arctic is extremely diverse in terms of landscapes, varying from pack and drift ice to rugged shores, flat coastal plains, rolling hills and mountains surpassing 6000 metres above sea level (Denali, 6,194 m asl, in sub-arctic and boreal Alaska). The region has rivers and lakes, tundra and the largest forests in the world (the Russian Taiga).
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Vegetation zones in the Arctic Vegetation zones in the Arctic
The Circumpolar Arctic Vegetation Map (CAVM) project is an international effort to map the vegetation and associated characteristics of the circumpolar region, using a common base map. The base map is a false colour infrared image created from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite data.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Human impact on the Arctic environment 2032 (markets first scenario) Human impact on the Arctic environment 2032 (markets first scenario)
Human activities influence the environment and reduce the value of forests, tundra and plains in terms of original biodiversity and habitat. Primarily larger mammals are hit by the fragmentation caused by roads and pipelines. The GLOBIO methdology has modeled the future impact of human activities in the Arctic, as seen in this map. Infrastructure and settlements are used as proxies for human activities. The scenario used in this map is the 'Marke...
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Human impact on the Arctic environment 2002 Human impact on the Arctic environment 2002
Human activities influence the environment and reduce the value of forests, tundra and plains in terms of original biodiversity and habitat. Primarily larger mammals are hit by the fragmentation caused by roads and pipelines. The GLOBIO methdology has modeled the current impact of human activities in the Arctic, as seen in this map. Infrastructure and settlements are used as proxies for human activities.
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Major global bird migration routes to the Arctic Major global bird migration routes to the Arctic
Bird species that migrate to the Arctic coasts and wetlands arrive from nearly every corner of the planet. During the summer, the sun never or nearly never sets, resulting in a short but intensive breeding season when millions of migratory birds arrive in the Arctic to breed. The majority of these birds seek the wetlands and coastal shores of the tundra plains. No other place on Earth receives so many migratory species from nearly all corners of ...
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
2
Arctic protected areas and biomes Arctic protected areas and biomes
Using the Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF) definition of the Arctic, the majority of the current protected area (pie cheart to the left) is in the Arctic desert biome (45%), followed by the tundra biomes (29%). When looking at the total area that is currently protected in each biome, this shows that almost a third of the desert biome is protected (right figure).
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Definitions of the Arctic Definitions of the Arctic
Several definitions of the Arctic as a region exist and are all used extensively. Definitions of the geographic boundaries of the Arctic vary, including such definitions as the area with a July isotherm below 10º C, vegetation distribution (tundra) or political boundaries, such as the definition by CAFF (CAFF, 2001). Nowhere else on Earth do we find such vast areas of relatively undisturbed marine and coastal ecosystems.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Arctic, topography and bathymetry Arctic, topography and bathymetry
The Arctic is extremely diverse in terms of landscapes, varying from pack and drift ice to rugged shores, flat coastal plains, rolling hills and mountains surpassing 6000 metres above sea level (Denali, 6,194 m asl, in sub-arctic and boreal Alaska). The region has rivers and lakes, tundra and the largest forests in the world (the Russian Taiga).
18 Aug 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Arctic, topography and bathymetry Arctic, topography and bathymetry
The Arctic is extremely diverse in terms of landscapes, varying from pack and drift ice to rugged shores, flat coastal plains, rolling hills and mountains surpassing 6000 metres above sea level (Denali, 6,194 m asl, in sub-arctic and boreal Alaska). The region has rivers and lakes, tundra and the largest forests in the world (the Russian Taiga).
01 Jul 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Level of river fragmentation and flow regulation Level of river fragmentation and flow regulation
River fragmentation - The interruption of a river’s natural flow by dams, inter-basin transfers or water withdrawal - is an indicator of the degree to which rivers have been modified by man (Ward and Stanford, 1989, and Dynesius and Nilsson, 1994, as cited in Revenga et al., 2000). A fragmentation analysis carried out by the University of Umea and the World Resources Institute showed that, of 227 rivers assessed, 37% were strongly affected by fra...
26 Jan 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz (Le Monde diplomatique), March 2006
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Global flyways of the six subspecies of Red Knot Global flyways of the six subspecies of Red Knot
The Red Knot is a migratory shorebird that travels up to 20,000 km twice a year from its breeding grounds on the high Arctic tundra to its southern non-breeding sites. Along with having one of the longest total migrations of any bird, some populations also fly as much as 8,000–9,000 km between stopover sites in a single flight. As a shellfish-eating specialist avoiding pathogen-rich freshwater habitats, the Red Knot relies on the few large ti...
15 Nov 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Lesser White-fronted Goose migratory routes in Eurasiah Lesser White-fronted Goose migratory routes in Eurasiah
The globally threatened Lesser White-fronted Goose is a Palearctic migrant, breeding discontinuously in forest- or shrub tundra and mountainous shrubby wetlands from Fennoscandia to easternmost Russia. The species has declined rapidly since the 1950s leading to a fragmentation of its breeding range. Many key stop-over and wintering sites are still unknown. Today, three distinct wild sub-populations remain, of which the two Western Palearc...
15 Nov 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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