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Tag: Tundra

Human impact: Barents region 2032 (markets first scenario)
The greater region around the Barents Sea, with parts of Norway, Finland, Sweden and Russia, represents one of the most populated areas of the Arctic. The development of roads and other infrastructure fragments the fragi...
01 Nov 2002 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Human impact: Barents region 2032 (security first scenario)
The greater region around the Barents Sea, with parts of Norway, Finland, Sweden and Russia, represents one of the most populated areas of the Arctic. The development of roads and other infrastructure fragments the fragi...
01 Nov 2002 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Arctic map, political
The Arctic is extremely diverse in terms of landscapes, varying from pack and drift ice to rugged shores, flat coastal plains, rolling hills and mountains surpassing 6000 metres above sea level (Denali, 6,194 m asl, in s...
16 Sep 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Protected areas and wilderness
Wilderness areas in the Arctic, representing vast expanses of tundra and taiga that sees very little human disturbance and stress have been determined by an analysis prepared by the UN Environment Programme World Conserv...
06 Dec 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Arctic transportation routes - roads, shipping and pipelines
Land infrastructure represents a fragmentation of the natural ecosystems, splitting up expanses of tundra and taiga - and creates a disturbance in the form of traffic. In addition, it promotes development of side roads, ...
06 Dec 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Protected areas in the Arctic
The Arctic is a unique region in the world, with very little human activity and vast expanses of tundra and taiga that presents ecological values. This graphics presents the areas that currently are protected for conserv...
06 Dec 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Increases in annual temperatures for a recent five-year period, relative to 1951-1980
Warming is widespread, generally greater over land than over oceans, and the largest gains in temperatures for the planet are over the North American Arctic, north central Siberia, and on the Antarctic Peninsula. These r...
01 Jun 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Landcover - Europe and Central Asia
The Western part of the Eurasian continent, has some of the most populated and fertile parts of the World. Central Europe is densely populated, with few remaining fragments of undisturbed habitat, except for the mountain...
20 Jul 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Arctic map, political
The Arctic is extremely diverse in terms of landscapes, varying from pack and drift ice to rugged shores, flat coastal plains, rolling hills and mountains surpassing 6000 metres above sea level (Denali, 6,194 m asl, in s...
11 Feb 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Ecoregions in Antarctica
Antarctica represents a very unique and special case on our planet. With the richness of the Southern Ocean, the coasts and the Southern islands have relatively high biodiversity and biomass in the form of numerous sea b...
31 Jul 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Major global bird migration routes to the Arctic
Bird species that migrate to the Arctic coasts and wetlands arrive from nearly every corner of the planet. During the summer, the sun never or nearly never sets, resulting in a short but intensive breeding season when mi...
31 Jul 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Vegetation density/distribution in the high Arctic
The current vegetation density and distribution in the high Arctic can be calculated using satellite images. The vegetation index, 'greenness' (NDVI) represents a benchmark of the presence and ratio of photosynthesis. In...
31 Jul 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Arctic, topography and bathymetry (topographic map)
The Arctic is extremely diverse in terms of landscapes, varying from pack and drift ice to rugged shores, flat coastal plains, rolling hills and mountains surpassing 6000 metres above sea level (Denali, 6,194 m asl, in s...
31 Jul 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Increases in annual temperatures for a recent five-year period, relative to 1951-1980
Warming is widespread, generally greater over land than over oceans, and the largest gains in temperatures for the planet are over the North American Arctic, north central Siberia, and on the Antarctic Peninsula. These r...
01 Jun 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Vegetation and land cover in the Arctic
The land mass in the Arctic - Greenland and parts of Canada, Alaska, Russia and the Nordic countries - surrounds the Arctic Ocean. In the low Arctic, down to the temperate regions, the taiga coniferous forests represents...
31 Jul 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Tundra
Tundra ecosystems are dense in carbon. They have little potential to gain more carbon but a huge amount could be lost if the permafrost were to thaw. Prevention of climate change is currently the only failsafe method o...
27 May 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Definition of the geographic areas covered in the Arctic Biodiversity Assessment
The Arctic Council study on trends in the polar ecosystems - the Arctic Biodiversity Assessment (ABA) focuses on the areas displayed in this map. The high- and low Arctic regions are defined from the bioclimatic zones in...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
Distribution and trends of wild Rangifer in the Arctic
Distribution and observed trends of wild Rangifer populations throughout the circumpolar Arctic (from The Circum Arctic Rangifer Monitoring and Assessment Network, CARMA). Note: Wild boreal forest reindeer have not been ...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
Peatland in Arctic Russia
Wetlands are widely distributed in the Arctic, covering about 70% of the region. Of the six Ramsar wetland types represented, the most extensive are forested and non-forested peatlands. Peatlands are wetlands where organ...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
Red Knot, distribution, breeding areas and migratory routes, by subspecies
The red knot, Calidris canutus, is an example of a longdistance migratory shorebird. It has been the subject of extensive research worldwide including studies on its breeding cycle, winter ecology, and stopover sites. It...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
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