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Items not regulated Items not regulated
The Technical Regulation of the Customs Union establishes common principles and rules for Belarus, Kazakhstan and the Russian Federation. The category ‘On the safety of toys’ contains a list of items not regarded as toys and therefore not regulated. This list is comprised of sports equipment including that used for underwater activities, firearm replicas, imitation jewellery for children, swimming equipment (e.g. inflatable arm floats) and prote...
25 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Concentrations of heavy metals in children's toys Concentrations of heavy metals in children's toys
The study found that of the 569 products tested, 104 (18 per cent) exceeded the limit for lead, 18 (3 per cent) exceeded the limit for mercury, 45 (8 per cent) exceeded the limit for arsenic and 75 products (13 per cent) exceeded the limit for antimony. Seventy-five (13 per cent) of these products contained two or more toxic metals, thereby increasing the likelihood of harmful impacts.
25 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Impact of toxic metals Impact of toxic metals
The toxic substances found in toys in the study can cause a variety of harmful consequences. Lead is a neurotoxin with no safe level of exposure. Even small amounts in children can give rise to learning difficulties, attention deficit disorder, trouble with coordination, anemia, as well as visual, spatial and speech problems. Mercury damages the kidneys and can inflict damage on the nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, hematolo...
25 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Movement of the toys Movement of the toys
Of the 164 products containing a toxic metal, six originated in the EU, contrary to labeling data. The presence of such substances raises questions over the integrity of EU standards and regulations for children’s products. A large proportion of products containing toxic metals also contained the Russian conformity mark which supposedly confirms compliance with existing national safety requirements. This raises concerns among safety advocates i...
25 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Percentage of analysed toys that exceeded the Russian regulatory limit for toxic metal content in soil Percentage of analysed toys that exceeded the Russian regulatory limit for toxic metal content in soil
The study found that of the 569 products tested, 104 (18 per cent) exceeded the limit for lead, 18 (3 per cent) exceeded the limit for mercury, 45 (8 per cent) exceeded the limit for arsenic and 75 products (13 per cent) exceeded the limit for antimony. Seventy-five (13 per cent) of these products contained two or more toxic metals, thereby increasing the likelihood of harmful impacts.
25 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Metal contamination in analysed toys Metal contamination in analysed toys
The study found that of the 569 products tested, 104 (18 per cent) exceeded the limit for lead, 18 (3 per cent) exceeded the limit for mercury, 45 (8 per cent) exceeded the limit for arsenic and 75 products (13 per cent) exceeded the limit for antimony. Seventy-five (13 per cent) of these products contained two or more toxic metals, thereby increasing the likelihood of harmful impacts.
25 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Origin of the toys Origin of the toys
Of the 164 products containing a toxic metal, six originated in the EU, contrary to labeling data. The presence of such substances raises questions over the integrity of EU standards and regulations for children’s products. A large proportion of products containing toxic metals also contained the Russian conformity mark which supposedly confirms compliance with existing national safety requirements. This raises concerns among safety advocates in...
25 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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World Toys Market and Population and GDP in 2010 World Toys Market and Population and GDP in 2010
Toys are a big business. Between 2007 and 2010 the global toys market grew by nearly 5 per cent in value terms – from US$78.1 billion to US$83.3 billion. The majority of the toys on the market – many millions of them – are manufactured in China, often under licenses from large Western and Japanese conglomerates. In this study, we also found toys made in Armenia, Belarus, Russia, Ukraine and the European Union (EU).
25 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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