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Tourism in the Mediterranean countries Tourism in the Mediterranean countries
The Mediterranean basin, if considered as a single area, is by far the largest global tourism destination, attracting almost a third of the world’s international tourists (306 million out of 980 million worldwide) and generating more than a quarter of international tourism receipts (190 out of 738 billion Euro worldwide). It is forecasted that the Mediterranean region will reach 500 million of international tourist arrivals by 2030 (UNWTO 2012).
19 Nov 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Tourist pressure on Mediterranean coast Tourist pressure on Mediterranean coast
Tourism contributes CO2 emissions, mostly through increased use of air and road transportation. Beyond that, the major direct pressure from coastal tourism on the marine and coastal environment is the demand for space, both in the coastal zone, resulting mainly in urbanisation, and on the coastline itself, through construction of marinas and other infrastructure that leads to concretisation of the shores. The concentration of tourism within spec...
19 Nov 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Tourism in the Mediterranean countries Tourism in the Mediterranean countries
The economic importance of coastal tourism is unquestionable, although due to data limitations there is no comprehensive analysis of the sector’s contribution to the global economy. The Mediterranean Basin alone hosted some 250 million visitors in 2008. In France, tourism provides 43 per cent of jobs in coastal regions, generating more revenue than fishing or shipping. In the UK, tourism to the coast is worth £110 billion (approximately US$171 ...
16 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Estimated potential yearly whale watching revenue Estimated potential yearly whale watching revenue
The value of marine recreational activities was calculated by Cisneros-Montemayor & Sumaila (2010). A database of reported expenditure on marine recreational activities was compiled for 144 coastal countries, with the authors estimating that in 2003, nearly 60 million recreational anglers around the world generated a total of about US$40 billion in expenditure, supporting over 950 000 jobs. Hoyt (2001) estimated that over 13 million people worldw...
16 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Tourism, a source for economy and employment Tourism, a source for economy and employment
The economic importance of coastal tourism is unquestionable, although due to data limitations there is no comprehensive analysis of the sector’s contribution to the global economy. The Mediterranean Basin alone hosted some 250 million visitors in 2008. In France, tourism provides 43 per cent of jobs in coastal regions, generating more revenue than fishing or shipping. In the UK, tourism to the coast is worth £110 billion (approximately US$171 ...
16 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Blue flags up! Blue flags up!
Marine environments are key assets of global tourism, and their preservation is ultimately a precondition for the survival of marine and coastal tourism.
16 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Tourism in SIDS Tourism in SIDS
Tourism is a vital sector of the economies of most SIDS. For more than half of the SIDS, it is their largest source of foreign exchange. The social, economic and environmental well-being of many SIDS is tied to this sector (UNDESA 2010). Tourism receipts represent more than 30% of their total exports; in comparison, the average for the world is just over 5% (World Bank 2011).
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Number of tourist hotel overnight stays Number of tourist hotel overnight stays
Graphics from the year 2000 Baltic 21 biannual indicator-based status report on sustainable development in the Baltic Sea Region (Baltic 21 Series No 1/2000). This graphic shows the number of tourist hotel overnight stays in Baltic countries.
10 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Tourism in the Antarctic Tourism in the Antarctic
the graph shows the number of tourist and ships going to the Antarctic from 1981 to 1996. It shows a steady increase of both tourists and ships going to antarctica. Studies have been done to estimate the effects the increased tourism has on the antarctic environment. A great number of tourists can cause disruption in wildlife breeding and reduce populations. Reports of ships hitting underwater rocks, casuing oil spills that greatly affect nearby ...
28 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Benefits from marine and coastal ecosystems and activities Benefits from marine and coastal ecosystems and activities
Besides the well-known economic value of fisheries, there are several other activities generating significant revenues in coastal and marine areas. This graphic discusses the economic benefits of coastal tourism, trade and shipping, offshore oil and gas, and fisheries. It also illustrates the estimated mean value of marine biomes such as estuaries and coastal reefs.
17 May 2005 - by Delphine Digout, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Threats to the World's coral reefs Threats to the World's coral reefs
Major observed threats to the world's coral reefs include tourism, poison fishing, overexploitation, sedimentation, coral harvesting, dynamite fishing and pollution. This graphic explains which activities or conditions are affecting various coral reefs throughout the world. The graphic 'Major Threats to Reefs' shows the percentage of reefs that are threatened by overexploitation, coastal development, inland pollution and marine pollution, and the...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Trends in tourism Trends in tourism
Shows the amount of international tourist and the amount of tourist receipts from 1950 to 2000. Tourism, which has expanded dramatically over the past 50 years, looks set to continue growing, as societies become more mobile and prosperous.
14 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Climate change impact on mountain vegetation zones Climate change impact on mountain vegetation zones
The figure shows a comparison of current vegetation zones at a hypothetical dry temperate mountain site with simulated vegetation zones under a climate-warming scenario. Mountains cover about 20% of the Earth's continents and serve as an important water source for most major rivers. Paleologic records indicate that climate warming in the past has caused vegetation zones to shift to higher elevations, resulting in the loss of some species and ecos...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Share of food in total household expenses (Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan) Share of food in total household expenses (Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan)
In all the areas bordering on the Caspian, priority must be given to diversifying activities and investment. Particular attention should be given to sectors such as tourism, agriculture and food production as well as services.
29 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Caribbean casualties due to hurricanes Caribbean casualties due to hurricanes
From Trinidad to Tallahassee, Florida, tropical storms have ravaged the Caribbean basin, exacting a multibillion-dollar toll on housing, schools, hospitals, roads and sewage systems. Most of the casualties were in Haiti. But almost no community escaped unscathed. In Grenada, half of the population is now homeless, the famed nutmeg groves flattened, the power plants wrecked. The tourism industry that was the island’s lifeblood could take years to ...
01 Feb 2006 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Economic impacts of Gorilla tourism in Uganda Economic impacts of Gorilla tourism in Uganda
Gorilla tourism in Uganda is primarily taking place in the Mgabinga Gorilla National Park and Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, and represents one of the main destinations for wildlife tourism in the country. Estimations of the national and community level economic impacts in Uganda, based on a full capacity of 8760 tourists per year and expenditures of USD 874 were calculated to present the direct impacts, the indirect (secondary support activi...
02 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Trends in Antarctic tourism Trends in Antarctic tourism
Antarctic annual sea-ice extent is projected to decrease by 25 per cent by 2100, and this will bring easier access to the Antarctic continent by ship. This is likely to affect not only research, which is a main activity in a continent designated as a “natural reserve devoted to peace and science”, but also commercial activities, such as tourism. Tourism activities are expanding tremendously with the number of shipborne tourists increasing by 430 ...
01 Nov 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Northern Sea Route and the Northwest Passage compared with currently used shipping routes Northern Sea Route and the Northwest Passage compared with currently used shipping routes
Climate models project that summer sea ice in the Arctic Basin will retreat further and further away from most Arctic landmasses, opening new shipping routes and extending the navigation season in the Northern Sea Route by between two and four months. Previously frozen areas in the Arctic may therefore become seasonally or permanently navigable, increasing the prospects for marine transport through the Arctic and providing greater access to Arcti...
01 Oct 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Ratio of existing ski areas in the Alps with natural snow-reliability under current conditions and warmer conditions Ratio of existing ski areas in the Alps with natural snow-reliability under current conditions and warmer conditions
Winter tourism is a significant part of the economy of Alpine countries and the most important source of income in many regions. In Austria, winter tourism revenue makes up 4.5 per cent of GNP and half of the total income from tourism. Much of winter tourism is based around the ski industry, which is dependent on reliable snow conditions. Although snow fall is expected to increase at high elevations, it is winter temperatures that largely determi...
01 Jun 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Money talks for turtles - conservation and economy Money talks for turtles - conservation and economy
Marine turtles have been used for eggs, meat, shell, oil, leather or other products for 7000 years. Modern times have introduced another way for society to profit from these species - to generate economic income as a tourism attraction. Sound turtle management relies on local communities, which – as economic incentive - should receive a fair share of the revenues. In many cases, the bulk of the revenues from the local level end up elsewhere, eve...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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