HomeAboutActivitiesMapsPhotosPublicationsNews
 
Home >> Stratosphere

Tag: Stratosphere

Global CFC production Global CFC production
Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), along with other chlorine- and bromine-containing compounds, have been implicated in the accelerated depletion of ozone in the Earth's stratosphere. CFCs were developed in the early 1930s and are used in a variety of industrial, commercial, and household applications.
28 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Number of extra skin cancer cases related to UV radiation Number of extra skin cancer cases related to UV radiation
The most widely recognised damage occurs to the skin. The direct effects are sun burn, chronic skin damage (photo-aging) and an increased risk of developing various types of skin cancer. Models predict that a 10 per cent decrease in the ozone in the stratosphere could cause an additional 300,000 non-melanoma and 4,500 (more dangerous) melanoma skin cancers worldwide annually.
29 Nov 2007 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
The “Hole”: a result of special weather conditions over the pole repeated every spring The “Hole”: a result of special weather conditions over the pole repeated every spring
The Antarctic continent is circled by a strong wind in the stratosphere which flows around Antarctica and isolates air over Antarctica from air in the midlatitudes. The region poleward of this jet stream is called the Antarctic polar vortex. The air inside the Antarctic polar vortex is much colder than midlatitude air.” “When temperatures drop below -78°C, thin clouds form of ice, nitric acid, and sulphuric acid mixtures. Chemical reactions on th...
29 Nov 2007 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Ozone hole size 1980–2006 Ozone hole size 1980–2006
The extent of ozone depletion for any given period depends on complex interaction between chemical and climatic factors such as temperature and wind. The unusually high levels of depletion in 1988, 1993 and 2002 were due to early warming of the polar stratosphere caused by air disturbances originating in mid-latitudes, rather than by major changes in the amount of reactive chlorine and bromine in the Antarctic stratosphere.
01 Oct 2007 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
2
The Antarctic hole The Antarctic hole
Despite progress achieved under the Montreal Protocol, the ozone “hole” over the Antarctic was larger than ever in September 2006. This was due to particularly cold temperatures in the stratosphere, but also to the chemical stability of ozone-depleting substances – it takes about 40 years for them to break down.
29 Nov 2007 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
The Antarctic hole The Antarctic hole
Despite progress achieved under the Montreal Protocol, the ozone “hole” over the Antarctic was larger than ever in September 2006. This was due to particularly cold temperatures in the stratosphere, but also to the chemical stability of ozone-depleting substances – it takes about 40 years for them to break down.
31 Jul 2008 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Arctic Ozone Depletion and Stratospheric Temperature Arctic Ozone Depletion and Stratospheric Temperature
Changes in ozone amounts are closely linked to temperature, with colder temperatures resulting in more polar stratospheric clouds and lower ozone levels. Atmospheric motions drive the year-to-year temperature changes.The Arctic stratosphere has cooled slightly since 1979, but scientists are currently unsure of the cause.
02 Nov 2009 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Ozone Hole Size Ozone Hole Size
The extent of ozone depletion for any given period depends on complex interaction between chemical and climatic factors such as temperature and wind. The unusually high levels of depletion in 1988, 1993 and 2002 were due to early warming of the polar stratosphere caused by air disturbances originating in mid-latitudes, rather than by major changes in the amount of reactive chlorine and bromine in the Antarctic stratosphere.
02 Nov 2009 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Chemical Ozone Destruction Process in the Stratosphere Chemical Ozone Destruction Process in the Stratosphere
No data
02 Nov 2009 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
The 'Hole': A Result of Specil Weather Conditions over the Pole Repeated Every Spring The 'Hole': A Result of Specil Weather Conditions over the Pole Repeated Every Spring
The Antarctic continent is circled by a strong wind in the stratosphere which flows around Antarctica and isolates air over Antarctica from air in the midlatitudes.
02 Nov 2009 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3