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Tourism in SIDS Tourism in SIDS
Tourism is a vital sector of the economies of most SIDS. For more than half of the SIDS, it is their largest source of foreign exchange. The social, economic and environmental well-being of many SIDS is tied to this sector (UNDESA 2010). Tourism receipts represent more than 30% of their total exports; in comparison, the average for the world is just over 5% (World Bank 2011).
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Small-scale fishery, large employment Small-scale fishery, large employment
Many small-scale operators are self-employed and engaged in both subsistence and commercial activities (FAO 2011). Aggregate capture fisheries play a major role in many national economies.
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Low Elevation Coastal Zones and CO2 Emisions Low Elevation Coastal Zones and CO2 Emisions
SIDS face a number of challenges in pursuit of energy security and poverty reduction, including high and rising oil prices, inadequate policies and regulations, insufficient promotion and investment in renewable energy and energy efficiency; lack of financing and technology transfer.
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Ecological footprint and the wealth of SIDS Ecological footprint and the wealth of SIDS
Small island developing states (SIDS) are a group of countries that “share similar sustainable development challenges, including small population, limited resources, susceptibility to natural disasters, vulnerability to external shocks and excessive dependence on international trade. Their growth and development is often further stymied by high transportation and communication costs, disproportionately expensive public administration and infras...
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Waste management hierarchy Waste management hierarchy
Greening the waste sector refers to a shift from less-preferred waste treatment and disposal methods such as incineration (without energy recovery) and different forms of landfilling towards the “three Rs”: Reduce, Reuse and Recycle. The strategy is to move upstream in the waste management hierarchy based on the internationally recognised approach of Integrated Solid Waste Management (ISWM)(UNEP 2011).
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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SIDS freshwater availability SIDS freshwater availability
SIDS, though surrounded by water, grapple with limited potable water supplies, poor potable water quality, sanitisation and inefficient distribution systems. The connectivity of the different components of the water cycle is also important, as shortages along one point affect another. Significant pressure is placed on existing freshwater systems in SIDS by urbanisation, unsustainable agricultural practices, the demands of tourism, mining and ...
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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A great socio economic diversity for Small Island Developing States A great socio economic diversity for Small Island Developing States
Small island developing states (SIDS) are a group of countries that “share similar sustainable development challenges, including small population, limited resources, susceptibility to natural disasters, vulnerability to external shocks and excessive dependence on international trade. Their growth and development is often further stymied by high transportation and communication costs, disproportionately expensive public administration and infras...
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Pacific regional waste composition Pacific regional waste composition
Waste management in SIDS, as in other developing countries, is a growing problem because of population growth, urbanisation, changing consumption patterns and the large numbers of tourists. Most of the waste collected is disposed of via sanitary landfilling, as opposed to recycling. This form of disposal represents missed economic opportunities and creates future challenges for SIDS due to the limited availability of land, potential contaminatio...
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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