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Varying contribution to climate change Varying contribution to climate change
Share of transport-related greenhouse gas emissions generated by rail, sea, air and road.
04 Jun 2008 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Arctic, topography and bathymetry Arctic, topography and bathymetry
(See http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/arctic-topography-and-bathymetry1 for an updated version of this map) The Arctic is extremely diverse in terms of landscapes, varying from pack and drift ice to rugged shores, flat coastal plains, rolling hills and mountains surpassing 6000 metres above sea level (Denali, 6,194 m asl, in sub-arctic and boreal Alaska). The region has rivers and lakes, tundra and the largest forests in the world (the Russian Tai...
18 Dec 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Extraction activities and disputed areas in the Barents Sea Extraction activities and disputed areas in the Barents Sea
Norway and the Russian federation are currently disagreeing on the exact definition of their respective zones in the Barents Sea. The cause of the dispute is based on the special status that Svalbard has, as an International territory, under Norwegian stewardship - in some ways similar to Antarctica. The disputed is expected to be solved through bilateral agreements. The Barents Sea is currently a hot area for developing new sites for extraction ...
01 Oct 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Projected changes in Arctic pack ice (sea ice minimum extent) Projected changes in Arctic pack ice (sea ice minimum extent)
The averages of the scenarios in the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA) for the Arctic sea ice extent (the permanent ice) are presented in this map, with the successive decrease in the ice up to 2090. The projections are based on the models of the IPCC Third Assessment Report (IPCC TAR).
18 Dec 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Barents Region, topography and bathymetry Barents Region, topography and bathymetry
The Barents Region is in the Arctic and covers the area of Western Russia and the northern areas of Finland, Sweden and Norway. The Barents Sea has anaverage depth 230 m, bordered by the shelf edge towards the Norwegian Sea in the west, the island of Svalbard (Norway) in the northwest, and the islands of Franz Josef Land and Novaya Zemlya (Russia) in the northeast and east.
01 Jul 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Antarctica, overview Antarctica, overview
Antarctic is the fifth largest continent of the world at 14 million square kilometres and is covered in a permanent continental ice. The ice is distributed in two major ice sheets, the East Antarctic and the West Antarctic, and in addition there are shelf ice, extending over the sea water.
17 Mar 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Disposal Operations in 1997 in Million Metric Tonnes Disposal Operations in 1997 in Million Metric Tonnes
This figure shows the total amounts of hazardous waste disposed of through 16 different methods in 1997 by parties to the Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and Their Disposal. It shows the amounts based on export data and based on import data. List of D-codes (disposal methods) from the full report: 'D1, D2 and D4 (landfill, land treatment); D3 and D12 (underground storage); D5 (specially engineered la...
06 Mar 2006 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Development of fossil fuel resources in the Arctic, 2005 Development of fossil fuel resources in the Arctic, 2005
Barents Sea: The 2004 lifting of an embargo on offshore hydrocarbon exploration in the Norwegian Barents has renewed activity there. Regulation of exploration is animportant political issue. Debate in 2005 focused on environmental protection and establishing areas free of oil development. In Russia five companies were selected as finalists in the joint development of the Shtokman gas field, in the Barents Sea. This field is estimated to hold twic...
13 Feb 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Wetlands in the Baltic Sea drainage basin Wetlands in the Baltic Sea drainage basin
Percentage of wetlands out of total land area (by grid cell) for the Baltic Sea drainage basin. Wetlands acts as buffers in cases such as antropogenic nutrient releases (which leads to eutrophication) and acidification. The ratios have been estimated from various sources, and resembles the situation at approximately 1990.
04 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Land cover - Baltic Sea region Land cover - Baltic Sea region
The Baltic Sea region is covered in primarily forested land and crop land, in the taiga and temperate forest regions. Agricultural land is a main driver for nutrient inputs to the Baltic Sea, and thus eutorphication, and is thus relevant. Forest lands acts as a net buffer for nutrients, unless it is heavily diked and/or fertilised.
04 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Baltic Sea drainage basin Baltic Sea drainage basin
This 'basemap' displays the extent of the drainage basin (the boundary for the water that ends up in the Baltic Sea), and the countries in the region. The drainage basin represents all water that drains into the sea, through rivers and ground water.
04 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Potential impact of sea level rise: Nile Delta Potential impact of sea level rise: Nile Delta
Rising sea level would destroy weak parts of the sand belt, which is essential for the protection of lagoons and the low-lying reclaimed lands in the Nile delta of Egypt (Mediterranean Sea). The impacts would be very serious: One third of Egypt's fish catches are made in the lagoons. Sea level rise would change the water quality and affect most fresh water fish. Valuable agricultural land would be inundated.
17 May 2005 - by Otto Simonett, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Major waste exporters, Major waste receivers Major waste exporters, Major waste receivers
Some countries, for example the Netherlands and Belgium, seem to act as “waste dispatchers”. Their figures suggest that they are the top waste exporters, a fact that reflects neither the waste they produce (given their population) nor their internal processing capacity. Presumably large amounts of hazardous waste are simply passing through Antwerp, Rotterdam and other industrial ports on the North Sea.
15 Dec 2006 - by Emmanuelle Bournay
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Caspian Sea and the world: the stage and the actors Caspian Sea and the world: the stage and the actors
The Caspian Sea region presents a wealth of opportunities in various aspect, including bioresources, transport corridors, and not ecotourism. These new ventures may bring increased prosperity, but they also put pressure on traditional rural communities and the environment.
29 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Human Development Index (HDI) for the Caspian Sea countries Human Development Index (HDI) for the Caspian Sea countries
The characteristic feature in all four post-Soviet countries (Russia, Turkmenistan, Kazakhstan, Azerbaijan) is a relatively high level of education in relation to national income and rather low life expectancy, indicating high levels of poverty and deficient healthcare. In contrast the level for all three indicators in Iran is fairly balanced.
29 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Markets for Caspian oil and gas Markets for Caspian oil and gas
The prospects for rapid oil wealth contrast with fast spreading poverty following the collapse of the Soviet economy. Although massive investment has suddenly been channelled into the area, its effect is still both geographically and socially very limited, with little widespread impact on society.
29 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Biodiversity in the Caspian Sea (Approximate numbers) Biodiversity in the Caspian Sea (Approximate numbers)
The region presents a wealth of opportunities in other areas, including bioresources, transport corridors, and not least ecotourism. These new ventures may bring increased prosperity, but they also put pressure on traditional rural communities and the environment. This graphic presents the number of species in the groups: phytoplankton, zooplankton, zoobenthos, fishes, marine and land mammals and birds.
22 Feb 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Oil exports from inland Eurasia via the Mediterranean Sea, current and projected (2002 and 2010) Oil exports from inland Eurasia via the Mediterranean Sea, current and projected (2002 and 2010)
The Black and Mediterranean Seas are one of the main outlets for transporting fuel resources that have been extracted around the Caspian Sea region and from further inland. Oil is transported in pipelines to the ports on the Black Sea. Forecast project a dramatic increase by 2010, including the opening of a new port in Turkey.
29 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Mine and industrial site in Koshkar-Ata, Kazakhstan Mine and industrial site in Koshkar-Ata, Kazakhstan
Much of the area near Koshkar-Ata Lake in Kazakhstan, just off the shore of the Caspian Sea, has been severely polluted due to mining activities of uranium phosphate. The area is also affected from chemical plants and metallurgic industries. The pollutants are quickly making there way to the Caspian Sea.
29 Nov 2007 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Share of food in total household expenses (Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan) Share of food in total household expenses (Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan)
In all the areas bordering on the Caspian, priority must be given to diversifying activities and investment. Particular attention should be given to sectors such as tourism, agriculture and food production as well as services.
29 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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