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Oil pollution in Azerbaijan Oil pollution in Azerbaijan
There are hundreds of abandoned oil wells in Azerbaijan, and thousands in Kazakhstan, many of which have been submerged by the rising sea. There are reports of big leaks into the water, killing waterfowl and fish. Thousands of hectares of soil on Azerbaijan’s Apsheron peninsula are unsuitable for agricultural use.
29 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Illegal trade of caviar, 2000-2005 Illegal trade of caviar, 2000-2005
It is not clear to what extent the temporary ban on caviar exports has boosted well established illegal domestic and international trafficking, obviously not accounted for in the official figures. The illegal trade in caviar threatens the sturgeon populations around the Caspian Sea.
29 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Population by administrative region, Caspian Sea region Population by administrative region, Caspian Sea region
Several countries and provinces – Iran, Daghestan, Turkmenistan and parts of Azerbaijan – still enjoy very high population growth rates (in excess of 10 per 1,000). Many of the population tends to gravitate towards the Caspian Sea.
29 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Potential environmental hazards in the Caspian Sea Region Potential environmental hazards in the Caspian Sea Region
Oil slicks glittering on the surface of the sea and thousands of hectares of soil penetrated by oil leaking from abandoned wells are just part of the pollution that people living around the Caspian Sea must endure. In addition there are various industries, particularly chemicals and mining, large-scale irrigated farming and untreated household waste. Combined with the effects of the oil, all these forms of pollution have a serious impact on the w...
29 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Infant mortality in the Caspian Sea region Infant mortality in the Caspian Sea region
Even if over the last two decades, or perhaps longer, the fertility rate has dropped significantly, the authorities nevertheless have to cope with all the health, education and employment problems associated with a rapidly rising, youthful population. Infant mortality is still a serious issue in the region and an important indicator on the overall status of the health care system.
29 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Oil spill off the coast of Apsheron peninsula Oil spill off the coast of Apsheron peninsula
Thousands of hectares of soil on Azerbaijan’s Apsheron peninsula are unsuitable for agricultural use due to oil spills. The largest of these oil spills happened in May 1996. Oil extraction is happening off shore, in the Caspian Sea, and the oil is transported by pipelines.
29 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Total trade in sturgeon caviar, 1999-2003 Total trade in sturgeon caviar, 1999-2003
The caviar trade reportedly fell by about 70% between 1999 and 2003 but there is still every reason to monitor development of the sturgeon population and keep it on the list of endangered species. However it is not clear to what extent the temporary ban on caviar exports has boosted well established illegal domestic and international trafficking, obviously not accounted for in the official figures.
29 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Sea level change: estimations and predictions Sea level change: estimations and predictions
This resource includes four graphics that explain sea level change, an expected consequence of climate change. The first graphic, 'Relative Sea Level Over the Past 300 Years', shows the changes in sea level rise, in metres, that have occurred between 1700 and 2000 at three different locations: Amsterdam, Brest and Swinoujscie (in Poland). The second graphic, 'Causes of Sea Level Change: Simulated Global Mean Sea Level Changes 1900-2100' and the t...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Arctic map, political Arctic map, political
The Arctic is extremely diverse in terms of landscapes, varying from pack and drift ice to rugged shores, flat coastal plains, rolling hills and mountains surpassing 6000 metres above sea level (Denali, 6,194 m asl, in sub-arctic and boreal Alaska). The region has rivers and lakes, tundra and the largest forests in the world (the Russian Taiga). This is a simple grayscale political map.
07 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Development of fossil fuel resources in the Arctic, 2005 Development of fossil fuel resources in the Arctic, 2005
Barents Sea: The 2004 lifting of an embargo on offshore hydrocarbon exploration in the Norwegian Barents has renewed activity there. Regulation of exploration is animportant political issue. Debate in 2005 focused on environmental protection and establishing areas free of oil development. In Russia five companies were selected as finalists in the joint development of the Shtokman gas field, in the Barents Sea. This field is estimated to hold twic...
07 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Baltic Sea drainage basin Baltic Sea drainage basin
This 'basemap' displays the extent of the drainage basin (the boundary for the water that ends up in the Baltic Sea), and the countries in the region. The drainage basin represents all water that drains into the sea, through rivers and ground water.
07 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Human impact: Barents region 2002 Human impact: Barents region 2002
The greater region around the Barents Sea, with parts of Norway, Finland, Sweden and Russia, represents one of the most populated areas of the Arctic. The development of roads and other infrastructure fragments the fragile tundra and taiga and reduces the value of the habitats for larger mammals, such as reindeer, wolverines and bears.
01 Nov 2002 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Human impact: Barents region 2032 (sustainability first scenario) Human impact: Barents region 2032 (sustainability first scenario)
The greater region around the Barents Sea, with parts of Norway, Finland, Sweden and Russia, represents one of the most populated areas of the Arctic. The development of roads and other infrastructure fragments the fragile tundra and taiga and reduces the value of the habitats for larger mammals, such as reindeer, wolverines and bears. This illustrate the projected growth, according to the GEO-3 'sustainability first' scenario.
01 Nov 2002 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Human impact: Barents region 2032 (policy first scenario) Human impact: Barents region 2032 (policy first scenario)
The greater region around the Barents Sea, with parts of Norway, Finland, Sweden and Russia, represents one of the most populated areas of the Arctic. The development of roads and other infrastructure fragments the fragile tundra and taiga and reduces the value of the habitats for larger mammals, such as reindeer, wolverines and bears. This illustrate the projected growth, according to the GEO-3 'policy first' scenario.
01 Nov 2002 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Human impact: Barents region 2032 (markets first scenario) Human impact: Barents region 2032 (markets first scenario)
The greater region around the Barents Sea, with parts of Norway, Finland, Sweden and Russia, represents one of the most populated areas of the Arctic. The development of roads and other infrastructure fragments the fragile tundra and taiga and reduces the value of the habitats for larger mammals, such as reindeer, wolverines and bears. This illustrate the projected growth, according to the GEO-3 'markets first' scenario.
01 Nov 2002 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Human impact: Barents region 2032 (security first scenario) Human impact: Barents region 2032 (security first scenario)
The greater region around the Barents Sea, with parts of Norway, Finland, Sweden and Russia, represents one of the most populated areas of the Arctic. The development of roads and other infrastructure fragments the fragile tundra and taiga and reduces the value of the habitats for larger mammals, such as reindeer, wolverines and bears. This illustrate the projected growth, according to the GEO-3 'security first' scenario.
01 Nov 2002 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Industrial hot spots Tisza river basin Industrial hot spots Tisza river basin
On 30 January 2000 a tailings dam at the Aurul Mine in Romania overflowed and released 100,000 cubic metres of effluent containing cyanide into the Tisza River. By the time the overflow was detected, the alarm raised and emergency measures taken to staunch the flow, heavily contaminated wastewater had reached the Danube River and was on its way to Hungary and beyond. Traces of cyanide, albeit at a very low level, were still detected in the rive...
01 Feb 2006 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Water management in Central Asia: state and impact Water management in Central Asia: state and impact
The graphic shows the effects of the shrinking of the Aral sea, and related issues, on both population migration, and environmental impacts in other areas. It also shows other water problems that could lead to tensions and conflicts.
11 Feb 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Daugava/Zapadnaya Dvina and Nemunas/Neman river basins Daugava/Zapadnaya Dvina and Nemunas/Neman river basins
Overview over the transboundary Daugava/Zapadnaya Dvina and Nemunas/Neman river basins in North Eastern Europe. These basins span the countries of Russia, Latvia, Lithuania, Belarus and Poland, and the rivers drain to the Baltic Sea. This map was prepared for the DatabasiN project, which will coordinate spatial information for transboundary river basin management.
01 Jul 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Nile Delta: Potential Impact of Sea Level Rise Nile Delta: Potential Impact of Sea Level Rise
The potential impacts of sea level rise on the Nile Delta are expected to include a decline in water quality that would affect freshwater fish, the flooding of agricultural land and damage to infrastructure. This graphic shows the Nile Delta region as it is today (2002), the area as it would appear with a 0.5 m sea level rise, and the area as it would appear with a 1.0 m sea level rise.
12 Feb 2006 - by Otto Simonett, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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