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Tag: River

The Mekong and Salween river basins
Like the Salween and Yangtze rivers, the Mekong river arises in the Three Rivers Source Area high in the Tibetan plateau in Qinghai, China. The Sanjaingyuan National Nature Reserve was established to protect the headwate...
09 Dec 2015 - by Kaya Asdal
Contribution of snow and glacier melt to river flow: Selected upper river basins of the HICAP study, average 1998–2007
Precipitation falls as either snow or rain, depending on the temperature, which is closely linked to elevation. Snow can be stored as long-term (perennial) snow or become ice and contribute to the growth of glaciers. Sno...
09 Dec 2015 - by Kaya Asdal
Future contribution of snow and glacier melt to river flow: Projected total flow and average discharge by 2041–2050, RCP 8.5 dry-warm case
Depending on the stream flow composition (glacial melt, snow melt, rainfall, baseflow), different rivers within each of the basins will respond differently to climate change. Currently, the peak discharges within the upp...
09 Dec 2015 - by Kaya Asdal
Changes in discharge for selected rivers in the HKH region
Shifts in the seasonality of flows can have major implications for regional food security, especially when the timing of peak flows and growing seasons do not coincide. However, this study suggests that significant seaso...
09 Dec 2015 - by Kaya Asdal
The Indus river basin
The Indus is the 12th largest river in the world and has its source at Lake Ngangla Rinco on the Tibetan plateau. The river basin contains seven of the world’s highest peaks in addition to Everest, including K2 (8,600 m)...
09 Dec 2015 - by Kaya Asdal
The Ganges river basin
The Ganges is one of the three main river basins in the Hindu Kush Himalayas. Its source is high in the Himalayan mountains where the Bhagirathi river flows out of the Gangotri Glacier in India’s Uttarakhand state. It ta...
09 Dec 2015 - by Kaya Asdal
The Brahmaputra river basin
Starting from an elevation of 5,300 m, the Brahmaputra river flows across southern Tibet, passing through the Himalayas, descending onto the Assam plain, and finally emptying into the Bay of Bengal. The river undergoes a...
09 Dec 2015 - by Kaya Asdal
Water use: The case of the Brahmaputra river basin
The population of South Asia has tripled over the last 60 years and now accounts for around a quarter of the world’s population, with China alone accounting for around one-fifth.29 An estimated 210 million people living ...
09 Dec 2015 - by Kaya Asdal
Fragmentation pf the Volga river over the last 60 years
The construction of several dams along spawning rivers (mainly the Volga River) significantly altered water flows and destroyed about 90 per cent of the sturgeon’s spawning grounds (UNEP/GRID-Arendal 2006).
17 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
Freshwater availability per capita in Zambezi River Basin countries
The water flow in the Zambezi river is estimated at 3 600 cu m per second. This represents about 87 mm/year of equivalent rainfall and less than 10 per cent of the average rainfall in the basin (Shela 2000). The average...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
Urban Population in Zambezi River Basin States
Zambezi River Basin countries share similar settlement patterns characterized by both low and high densities. While the basin is largely rural, urbanization rates are high. In Botswana and Angola, urban population consti...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
Zambezi River runoff
A major impact of the construction of the Kariba and Cahora Bassa dams from 1950–1970 was the reduction in the Zambezi River runoff. Before the dam construction, the Zambezi River was torrential with high flows during t...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
Population distribution in the Zambezi River Basin
Population distribution is uneven in the basin, with large areas uninhabited and reserved for wildlife. In 1998, the average population density in the basin was 24 people per sq km, and this increased to 28.75 people per...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
Popoulation density increasing, per capita land area shrinking in Zambezi River Basin
The population of the Zambezi River Basin grew from 31.7 million in 1998 to 38.4 million in 2005, before reaching 40 million in 2008. It is projected that by 2025 the population will reach 51 million (Chenje 2000; SADC a...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
Forest cover in Zambezi basin countries
Zambezi River Basin countries have been losing forests over the decades, and this loss continues unabated. Rates of forest loss per year in the last 20 years have been significant with Tanzania, Zimbabwe and Mozambique r...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
Zambezi River Basin flood areas
Over the last two decades, the Zambezi River Basin has experienced extreme floods and droughts (SARDC and HBS 2010). Most of the flooding in the basin is associated with active cyclones that develop in the Indian Ocean. ...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
Threatened Species in the Zambezi River Basin countries
Despite the abundance of wildlife resources in the basin, there are pressures that threaten the existence of this resource. Species that have become extinct in the basin in recent times include the blue wildebeest in Mal...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
Zambezi River Basin wetlands
Wetlands cover a large area of the Zambezi River Basin. For example, in Zambia the Kafue Flats, Lukanga swamps, Barotse flood plains, Nyambomba swamps, Cuando, Busanga,Luangwa and Luena flats cover an area greater than 2...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
Zambezi River Basin vegetation
Land cover and land use have great impacts on water resources, as they affect how precipitation translates into runoff, infiltration, evaporation, and the quality of the water (Hirji et al. 2002). Almost 75 per cent of ...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
Zambezi River Basin average temperature
The temperature across the river basin varies according to elevation and, to a much lesser extent, latitude. Mean monthly temperatures for the coldest month, July, vary from below 13°C for higher elevation areas in the s...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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