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CO2 emissions from consumption and flaring of fossil fuels CO2 emissions from consumption and flaring of fossil fuels
A line graph showing the progress of CO2 emissions created from consumption and flaring of fossil fuels from 1980 to 2002. Indicates that Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union is the only region to have a reduction. Emissions are not usually monitored directly, but are generally estimated using models. Some emissions can be calculated with only limited accuracy. Emissions from energy and industrial processes are the most reliable (using energy ...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Human impact - Asian continent Human impact - Asian continent
Continental Asia is a hotspot for both biodiversity, wilderness abut also home to a majority of the World's population. The GLOBIO analysis shows that this region has seen quite significant human impacts, but with remaining wilderness in areas that has so far not been very attractive for human development - the Himalayas, the Tibetan highlands, and the Arctic regions of Russia.
04 Oct 2005 - by Torstein Olsen and Einar Lieng, Statens Kartverk (for UNEP/GRID-Arendal)
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Human impact - West Asia Human impact - West Asia
Vast areas of the West Asia region are sparsely populated, and are showing low fragmentation, but these are the unproductive desert areas, which naturally have quite low biodiversity (although there might be rare species there).
04 Oct 2005 - by Torstein Olsen and Einar Lieng, Statens Kartverk (for UNEP/GRID-Arendal)
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Human impact - Southeast Asia and Australia Human impact - Southeast Asia and Australia
The region, with Australia, New Guinea and Indonesia have unique flora and fauna with high biodiversity and many areas that has seen little human impact. Population pressures, especially in Indonesia, are starting to threaten these unique habitats, with species such as Orangutan.
04 Oct 2005 - by Torstein Olsen and Einar Lieng, Statens Kartverk (for UNEP/GRID-Arendal)
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Nenets Autonomous Okrug, reference map Nenets Autonomous Okrug, reference map
Nenets Autonomous Okrug is an administrative region in Arctic Northwest Russia, covering some 176000 sq km of tundra and marshland. The capital city of the region is Narian-Mar. Off the coast are parts of the Arctic ocean know as Barents and Kara seas, and the long island in the north west is Novaya Zemlya.
07 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Arctic map, political Arctic map, political
The Arctic is extremely diverse in terms of landscapes, varying from pack and drift ice to rugged shores, flat coastal plains, rolling hills and mountains surpassing 6000 metres above sea level (Denali, 6,194 m asl, in sub-arctic and boreal Alaska). The region has rivers and lakes, tundra and the largest forests in the world (the Russian Taiga). This is a simple grayscale political map.
07 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Development of fossil fuel resources in the Arctic, 2005 Development of fossil fuel resources in the Arctic, 2005
Barents Sea: The 2004 lifting of an embargo on offshore hydrocarbon exploration in the Norwegian Barents has renewed activity there. Regulation of exploration is animportant political issue. Debate in 2005 focused on environmental protection and establishing areas free of oil development. In Russia five companies were selected as finalists in the joint development of the Shtokman gas field, in the Barents Sea. This field is estimated to hold twic...
07 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Arctic, topography and bathymetry (topographic map) Arctic, topography and bathymetry (topographic map)
The Arctic represents the northermost area of the World, the Arctic Ocean and the land areas that surrounds it. The region is characterized but cold temperatures, and ice and snow. The summers are short, but with long periods of daylight (midnight sun). The winters are long and cold and with periods with no sun (polar night). The Arctic Ocean is one basin that is mostly covered by sea ice, and is connected to the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. The ...
01 Oct 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Baltic Sea drainage basin Baltic Sea drainage basin
This 'basemap' displays the extent of the drainage basin (the boundary for the water that ends up in the Baltic Sea), and the countries in the region. The drainage basin represents all water that drains into the sea, through rivers and ground water.
07 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Human impact - Asian continent Human impact - Asian continent
Continental Asia is a hotspot for both biodiversity, wilderness abut also home to a majority of the World's population. The GLOBIO analysis shows that this region has seen quite significant human impacts, but with remaining wilderness in areas that has so far not been very attractive for human development - the Himalayas, the Tibetan highlands, and the Arctic regions of Russia.
26 Jan 2006 - by Torstein Olsen and Einar Lieng, Statens Kartverk (for UNEP/GRID-Arendal)
5
Human impact - West Asia Human impact - West Asia
Vast areas of the West Asia region are sparsely populated, and are showing low fragmentation, but these are the unproductive desert areas, which naturally have quite low biodiversity (although there might be rare species there).
26 Jan 2006 - by Torstein Olsen and Einar Lieng, Statens Kartverk (for UNEP/GRID-Arendal)
3
Human impact - Southeast Asia and Australia Human impact - Southeast Asia and Australia
The region, with Australia, New Guinea and Indonesia have unique flora and fauna with high biodiversity and many areas that has seen little human impact. Population pressures, especially in Indonesia, are starting to threaten these unique habitats, with species such as Orangutan.
26 Jan 2006 - by Torstein Olsen and Einar Lieng, Statens Kartverk (for UNEP/GRID-Arendal)
3
Human impact: Barents region 2002 Human impact: Barents region 2002
The greater region around the Barents Sea, with parts of Norway, Finland, Sweden and Russia, represents one of the most populated areas of the Arctic. The development of roads and other infrastructure fragments the fragile tundra and taiga and reduces the value of the habitats for larger mammals, such as reindeer, wolverines and bears.
01 Nov 2002 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Human impact: Barents region 2032 (sustainability first scenario) Human impact: Barents region 2032 (sustainability first scenario)
The greater region around the Barents Sea, with parts of Norway, Finland, Sweden and Russia, represents one of the most populated areas of the Arctic. The development of roads and other infrastructure fragments the fragile tundra and taiga and reduces the value of the habitats for larger mammals, such as reindeer, wolverines and bears. This illustrate the projected growth, according to the GEO-3 'sustainability first' scenario.
01 Nov 2002 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Human impact: Barents region 2032 (policy first scenario) Human impact: Barents region 2032 (policy first scenario)
The greater region around the Barents Sea, with parts of Norway, Finland, Sweden and Russia, represents one of the most populated areas of the Arctic. The development of roads and other infrastructure fragments the fragile tundra and taiga and reduces the value of the habitats for larger mammals, such as reindeer, wolverines and bears. This illustrate the projected growth, according to the GEO-3 'policy first' scenario.
01 Nov 2002 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Impact of human activities on reindeer habitat - Barents region Impact of human activities on reindeer habitat - Barents region
The impact of infrastructure development on reindeer potentially threatens the cultural traditions of the Barents region indigenous people and their chosen way of life. The probability of impact on wildlife, vegetation and ecosystems is related to distance to different types of infrastructure. The distance zones of impact are lowest in forest and highest in open tundra. The extent of the zones are based upon several hundred field studies from int...
26 Jan 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Julien Rouaud, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Human impact: Barents region 2032 (markets first scenario) Human impact: Barents region 2032 (markets first scenario)
The greater region around the Barents Sea, with parts of Norway, Finland, Sweden and Russia, represents one of the most populated areas of the Arctic. The development of roads and other infrastructure fragments the fragile tundra and taiga and reduces the value of the habitats for larger mammals, such as reindeer, wolverines and bears. This illustrate the projected growth, according to the GEO-3 'markets first' scenario.
01 Nov 2002 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Human impact: Barents region 2032 (security first scenario) Human impact: Barents region 2032 (security first scenario)
The greater region around the Barents Sea, with parts of Norway, Finland, Sweden and Russia, represents one of the most populated areas of the Arctic. The development of roads and other infrastructure fragments the fragile tundra and taiga and reduces the value of the habitats for larger mammals, such as reindeer, wolverines and bears. This illustrate the projected growth, according to the GEO-3 'security first' scenario.
01 Nov 2002 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Nile Delta: Potential Impact of Sea Level Rise Nile Delta: Potential Impact of Sea Level Rise
The potential impacts of sea level rise on the Nile Delta are expected to include a decline in water quality that would affect freshwater fish, the flooding of agricultural land and damage to infrastructure. This graphic shows the Nile Delta region as it is today (2002), the area as it would appear with a 0.5 m sea level rise, and the area as it would appear with a 1.0 m sea level rise.
12 Feb 2006 - by Otto Simonett, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Nutrition in Central Asia [Russian] Nutrition in Central Asia [Russian]
In the year 2000 the Aral Sea region did not have properly balanced nutitional elements in food production and the supply was lower than demand. For the year 2020 the demand is predicted to grow and without preventing major climate change there may be a crisis in the area. In Russian.
14 Feb 2006 - by I. Atamuradova, V. Yemelin, P. Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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