HomeAboutActivitiesMapsPhotosPublicationsNews
 
Home >> Radioactivity

Tag: Radioactivity

Annual world nuclear reactor construction / Spent fuel generation Annual world nuclear reactor construction / Spent fuel generation
Both the volume and the level of radioactivity have to be considered – a large volume of waste with a low-level of radioactivity presents less danger than a smaller amount of waste with a high-level of radioactivity. For example, spent fuel (elements that have been removed from a reactor after use) makes up less than 1% of the volume of radioactive waste, but contains almost 95% of the total radioactivity.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Environment in Central Asia [Russian] Environment in Central Asia [Russian]
There are 25 billion tonnes of waste just from mining and metal production in Central Asia. The most effected areas are highlighted based on a variety of different types of environmental damage such as desertification and wind erosion. In Russian.
14 Feb 2006 - by I. Atamuradova, V. Yemelin, P. Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Environment in Central Asia Environment in Central Asia
There are 25 billion tonnes of waste just from mining and metal production in Central Asia. The most effected areas are highlighted based on a variety of different types of environmental damage such as desertification and wind erosion.
14 Feb 2006 - by I. Atamuradova, V. Yemelin, P. Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Environmental threats in the Barents Region Environmental threats in the Barents Region
The Barents region is in the Arctic and covers the area of Western Russia and the northern areas of Finland, Sweden and Norway. This map indicates the political boundaries and economic areas in the region. More importantly it shows where environmental dangers are located and the level of grazing on pastoral lands. (Please note that the The Barents Euro-Arctic Council has expanded the membership since 1998)
04 Oct 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Global atmospheric and underground nuclear explosions since 1945 Global atmospheric and underground nuclear explosions since 1945
Nuclear explosions - especially the atmospheric tests in the Arctic and from US, UK and Chinese tests at other sites in the world - are the primary source of radioactive contamination in the Arctic. Releases from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants in Europe are the second largest source of Arctic radioactivity, while the Chernobyl reactor accicent is the third.
21 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4