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Population growth in Sub-Saharan and Central Africa Population growth in Sub-Saharan and Central Africa
Current population projections by UN’s Population Division suggest an increase from ca. 0.9 billion today to 2.1 billion people by 2050 in Sub-Saharan Africa. The UN further estimates the urbanization in Sub-Saharan Africa, currently at 38 percent, to increase to 56.5 percent in 2050. Among the many environmental effects of this increase in populations, as well as urbanization, is the impact on the continents forests as the relative use of charco...
19 Jun 2014 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID Arendal
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Proportion of urban dwellers living in slum conditions in Zimbabwe Proportion of urban dwellers living in slum conditions in Zimbabwe
Zimbabwe has the lowest proportional slum population among the Zambezi Basin states at just 3.4 per cent, down from 4 per cent in 1990. The portion of national population living in urban areas was 36.4 per cent in 2006, about four million people, with a projected urban annual growth rate of 2.8 per cent to 2015.
21 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Proportion of urban dwellers living in slum conditions in Zambia Proportion of urban dwellers living in slum conditions in Zambia
Africa is the fastest urbanizing region in the world and Zambia was the third most highly urbanized country in southern Africa in 1990 after South Africa and Botswana (UN-HABITAT 2010). Zambia has continued to experience high levels of rural to urban migration, as citizens seek to benefit from urban-based employment opportunities and infrastructure, thus putting pressure on urban amenities and expanding unplanned settlements. Almost three-quarte...
21 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Proportion of urban dwellers living in slum conditions in Tanzania Proportion of urban dwellers living in slum conditions in Tanzania
The population living in unplanned peri-urban settlements has been decreasing as a proportion of total urban population, while the urban population has also been increasing. Therefore the numbers have been increasing while the proportion has gone down. Both impact on the extent of slum areas. About 70 per cent of urban residents in most cities in Tanzania live in unplanned settlements, slums or squatter areas. A special programme to upgrade t...
21 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Proportion of urban dwellers living in slum conditions Proportion of urban dwellers living in slum conditions
One-third of the urban population of Namibia lives in slum conditions, a situation that has remained almost static since 1990, reducing by less than one per cent.
21 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Proportion of urban dwellers living in slum conditions in Mozambique Proportion of urban dwellers living in slum conditions in Mozambique
The 15-year conflict from 1977-1992, and drought in some regions, caused significant migration to coastal and urban areas, which have continued to grow by more than four per cent per year although the war ended 20 years ago. Many people from rural areas joined other family members in the cities, thus expanding the overcrowded peri-urban areas. This trend is slowly being reversed through the development of amenities in rural areas as well as pr...
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Urban dwellers living in slum conditions in Malawi Urban dwellers living in slum conditions in Malawi
The slum population as a proportion of total urban population in Malawi has been reduced by almost 30 per cent since 1990, from 94.6 per cent to 66.4 per cent, and is projected to reach 64.57 per cent by 2015, according to UN Habitat (2010.
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Proportion of urban dwellers living in slum conditions in Botswana Proportion of urban dwellers living in slum conditions in Botswana
The number of people living in slum conditions as a proportion of urban residents is high, according to UNEP (2008), and slowly increasing, as shown in the figure.
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Population growth and urbanization in Botswana Population growth and urbanization in Botswana
The proportion of people living in urban areas is expected to increase from 57 per cent in 2005 to more than 70 per cent in 2030 (Government of Botswana 2009).
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Urbanisation on the Caspian shores Urbanisation on the Caspian shores
The population dynamics of the Caspian littoral states (US Census Bureau 2010) in 1992 – 2007 vary: while the overall population of Kazakhstan and Russia has declined by 7.6 and 4.8 per cent respectively, the population of Azerbaijan grew by 8.2 per cent, of Iran by 16.0 per cent and of Turkmenistan by 19.8 per cent. However, the total Caspian coastal population (including only administrative units contiguous to the Caspian Sea) gradually inc...
17 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Urban Population in Zambezi River Basin States Urban Population in Zambezi River Basin States
Zambezi River Basin countries share similar settlement patterns characterized by both low and high densities. While the basin is largely rural, urbanization rates are high. In Botswana and Angola, urban population constitute more than 60 per cent (SADC and SARDC 2008), and is projected to exceed 80 per cent by 2050 (UNHABITAT 2010). At just more than 25 per cent (UN-HABITAT 2010), Malawi is the least urbanized country in the basin, and yet the mo...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Human population growth rates, 1990–2000, and per capita Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and biological productivity in 2000 in ecological systems Human population growth rates, 1990–2000, and per capita Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and biological productivity in 2000 in ecological systems
Millennium Assessment systems with the lowest net primary productivity and lowest GDP tended to have the highest population growth rates between 1990 and 2000. Urban, inland water, and marine systems are not included due to the somewhat arbitrary nature of determining net primary productivity of the system (urban) or population growth and GDP (freshwater and marine) for them.
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Freshwater stress Freshwater stress
Today, the great pressure on water resources is rising human populations, particularly growing concentrations in urban areas. This diagram shows the impact of expected population growth on water usage by 2025, based on the UN mid-range population projection. It uses the current rate of water use per person without taking into account possible increases in water use due to economic growth or improvements in water use efficiency. The regions most v...
07 Nov 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Population growth projections in the Black Sea region until 2030 Population growth projections in the Black Sea region until 2030
Illustration in a set of graphics prepared for a pilot assessment report on the Black Sea drainage basin, for the UNEP Global Impact on Waters Assessment (GIWA). All data and information were prepared in close collaboration with the GIWA Black Sea team and the GIWA secretariat. The graphics were never not used in this form in the final report on the Black Sea, published in 2005.
07 Nov 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Coral reefs at risk from human activities Coral reefs at risk from human activities
Population growth and technology: operating together these two factors account for the major causes of coral reef decline - excessive domestic and agricultural waste pouring into ocean waters, poor land-use practices that increase sedimentation of rivers and then of reefs, and over-exploitation of reef resources, often in combination with practices such as harvesting with dynamite and poison, all degrade reefs.
28 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Trends in natural disasters Trends in natural disasters
With growing population and infrastructures the world’s exposure to natural hazards is inevitably increasing. This is particularly true as the strongest population growth is located in coastal areas (with greater exposure to floods, cyclones and tidal waves). To make matters worse any land remaining available for urban growth is generally risk-prone, for instance flood plains or steep slopes subject to landslides. The statistics in this graphic r...
29 Nov 2007 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Trends and projections in rural and urban population in developing regions and high-income countries Trends and projections in rural and urban population in developing regions and high-income countries
Shows the population growth rate of both rural and urban areas from around the world from 1960 and predicting total for 2025 using World Bank projections. The level of people living in cities are constantly increasing, according to the trends.
14 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Population and growth, projections and historic data Population and growth, projections and historic data
The population has rapidly increased in Africa, to reach approximately 905 million inhabitants by 2005. The rate of the annual growth is levelling out after seeing a peak around 1990. Out of the sub-regions, the population is fairly evenly distributed, as indicated in the pie-chart, with Central Africa trailing behind the others, and the Western Indian Ocean islands with the smallest share out of the total population.
02 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Population density and urban centers in the Caspian Sea region Population density and urban centers in the Caspian Sea region
Apart from two large urban areas – Baku-Sumgait and Makhachkala-Kaspiisk – and the Iranian coast on the southern shore, a very densely populated coastal strip where one agglomeration leads into the next, most of the population living on the shores of the Caspian is rural, with strong religious and family traditions actively maintained.
29 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Population by administrative region, Caspian Sea region Population by administrative region, Caspian Sea region
Several countries and provinces – Iran, Daghestan, Turkmenistan and parts of Azerbaijan – still enjoy very high population growth rates (in excess of 10 per 1,000). Many of the population tends to gravitate towards the Caspian Sea.
29 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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