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Population density and urban centres in the Mediterranean basin Population density and urban centres in the Mediterranean basin
The total population of the Mediterranean countries grew from 276 million in 1970 to 412 million in 2000 (a 1,35 % increase per year) and to 466 million in 2010. The population is predicted to reach 529 million by 2025. Four countries account for about 60 % of the total population: Turkey (81 million), Egypt (72 million), France (62 million), and Italy (60 million) (Plan Bleu computations based on UNDESA 2011). Overall, more than half the popula...
19 Nov 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Population density in the Hindu Kush Himalaya region (inhabitants per square kilometre) Population density in the Hindu Kush Himalaya region (inhabitants per square kilometre)
The Hindu Kush Himalaya (HKH) region extends 3500 km over all or part of eight countries, ranging from Afghanistan in the west to Myanmar in the east. The total estimated population of the region is 210 million. The 10 river basins, including the Indus, Ganges and Brahmaputra which have their source in the HKH region, provide water to 1.3 billion people, a fifth of the world’s population. Rural to urban migration is one of the most widespread glo...
04 Jan 2012 - by Hugo Ahlenius, Nordpil
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Total population per region, district or oblast Total population per region, district or oblast
Apart from two large urban areas – Baku- Sumgait and Makhachkala-Kaspisk – and the Iranian coast on the southern shore, a very densely populated coastal strip where one agglomeration leads into the next, most of the population living on the shores of the Caspian is rural, with strong religious and family traditions actively maintained. Some cities such as Baku have experienced very rapid urbanisation. In the early 1900s Baku was a city of 248 3...
07 Mar 2012 - by Philippe Rekacewicz (le Monde Diplomatique) and Cecile Marine
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Population density and urban centres Population density and urban centres
Apart from two large urban areas – Baku- Sumgait and Makhachkala-Kaspisk – and the Iranian coast on the southern shore, a very densely populated coastal strip where one agglomeration leads into the next, most of the population living on the shores of the Caspian is rural, with strong religious and family traditions actively maintained. Some cities such as Baku have experienced very rapid urbanisation. In the early 1900s Baku was a city of 248 3...
07 Mar 2012 - by Philippe Rekacewicz (le Monde Diplomatique) and Cecile Marine
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Population growth in Sub-Saharan and Central Africa and Population density projection in Congo Basin Population growth in Sub-Saharan and Central Africa and Population density projection in Congo Basin
As populations are rapidly rising in the Greater Congo Basin, so is the pressure on great ape habitat, and even more, the numbers killed relative to the gorilla populations to supply bushmeat.
01 Feb 2010 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Measures of Poverty: Hunger Density Measures of Poverty: Hunger Density
Population Density of Children Age 0-5 Underweight (per square kilometer). Children are defined as underweight if their weight-for-age z-scores are more than two standard deviations (2 SD) below the median of the NCHS/CDC/WHO International Reference Population.
03 Jan 2008 - by The Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York
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Water resources in Europe Water resources in Europe
On the continental scale, Europe appears to have abundant water resources. However, these resources are unevenly distributed, both between and within countries. Once population density is taken into account, the disequity in the distribution of water resources per inhabitant is striking.
14 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Population density, Central Asia Population density, Central Asia
Shows the population density of the Central Asian region. The Central Asia region mainly consists of the five Central Asian republics - Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz Republic, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan.
11 Feb 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Population density in the Balkans Population density in the Balkans
Fighting may have ended but migration continues. Despite increasingly strict EU policies on immigration, the “western dream” still exerts a powerful force of attraction on the people of the Balkans. In recent years there has been an increase in the number of migrants being forcibly repatriated, under readmission agreements signed by all the west Balkan countries with the EU.
30 Nov 2007 - by UNEP/DEWA/GRID-Europe
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Global poverty-biodiversity map Global poverty-biodiversity map
This map may be used to show areas in which biodiversity is threatened. Areas where high poverty and high population density coincides with high biodiversity may indicate areas in which poor people likely have no other choice than to unsustainably extract resources, in turn threatening biodiversity. The map has been produced from three primary data sources – stunted growth data collected on first level administrative units from FAO (FAO 2004), po...
04 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Coastal issues in the islands of Comoros and Mayotte Coastal issues in the islands of Comoros and Mayotte
With poverty and high population density this group of volcanic islands between Eastern Africa and Madagascar faces challenges in the management of the coastal environment. The islands are fringed by magnificent coral reefs, and the waters houses the rare coelacanth fish. Among the responses there have been initiatives to encourage ecotourism and the support in establishing the 400 km2 Mohéli Marine Park.
23 Feb 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Population density and urban centers in the Caspian Sea region Population density and urban centers in the Caspian Sea region
Apart from two large urban areas – Baku-Sumgait and Makhachkala-Kaspiisk – and the Iranian coast on the southern shore, a very densely populated coastal strip where one agglomeration leads into the next, most of the population living on the shores of the Caspian is rural, with strong religious and family traditions actively maintained.
29 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Population by administrative region, Caspian Sea region Population by administrative region, Caspian Sea region
Several countries and provinces – Iran, Daghestan, Turkmenistan and parts of Azerbaijan – still enjoy very high population growth rates (in excess of 10 per 1,000). Many of the population tends to gravitate towards the Caspian Sea.
29 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Climate change and natural disaster impacts in the Ferghana Valley Climate change and natural disaster impacts in the Ferghana Valley
Central Asia is a disaster-prone area, exposed to various natural hazards such as floods, droughts, avalanches, rockslide and earthquakes. It is also vulnerable to man-made disasters related to industrial activity and the radioactive and chemical dumps inherited from the Soviet period. Several factors - population density in disaster-prone areas, high overall population growth, poverty, land and water use, failure to comply with building codes an...
16 Mar 2006 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Population density in the Ferghana Valley province Population density in the Ferghana Valley province
Given the importance of agriculture for the whole Ferghana basin, natural resources such as land and water have historically been amongst the most important factor in this regions development. The size of the population depending upon these resources is consequently a key political security, and environmental issue. The Ferghana valley is the most populous area in Central Asia. High population densities increase the risk of depletion of natural r...
31 Oct 2006 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Urban, dryland, and polar systems Urban, dryland, and polar systems
Urban systems are built environments with a high human density. For mapping purposes, the MA uses known human settlements with a population of 5,000 or more, with boundaries delineated by observing persistent night-time lights or by inferring areal extent in the cases where such observations are absent.
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Population density in the Southern Caucasus Population density in the Southern Caucasus
Peacefully resolving the overriding political, economic and social concerns of our time requires a multifaceted approach, including mechanisms to address the links between the natural environment and human security. UNDP, UNEP, OSCE and NATO have joined forces in the Environment and Security (ENVSEC) Initiative to offer countries their combined pool of expertise and resources towards that aim. ENVSEC assessment of environment and security linkag...
09 Mar 2006 - by Jean Radvanyi,
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Human relative population density Human relative population density
Only areas with very low human population densities harbour orangutans. In Aceh and North Sumatra, human settlements are still primarily concentrated in the relatively flat coastal zones, particularly along the north and east coasts, and in alluvial areas elsewhere.
13 Sep 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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