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Development of organic matter, phosphorus and nitrate in EU 15 rivers Development of organic matter, phosphorus and nitrate in EU 15 rivers
The graphic shows the development of organic matter, phosphorus and nitrate in EU 15 rivers. Water resources in Europe have been profoundly influenced over the past century by human activities, including the construction of dams and canals, large irrigation and drainage systems, changes of land cover in most watersheds, high inputs of chemicals from industry and agriculture into surface and groundwater, and depletion of aquifers. Some of the most...
14 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Trends in groundwater nitrate concentrations Trends in groundwater nitrate concentrations
The graph shows the development of Nitrate concentration in groundwater from 1980 to 1995 in France, Britain and Denmark combined. Nitrate is a naturally occurring compound and is normal in small amounts, but excess amounts can pollute supplies of groundwater. Nitrate travels through soil contaminated by fertilizers, livestock waste and septic systems, carried by rain or irrigation water into groundwater supplies.
14 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Mean nutrient concentration in the coast of Romania Mean nutrient concentration in the coast of Romania
Illustration in a set of graphics prepared for a pilot assessment report on the Black Sea drainage basin, for the UNEP Global Impact on Waters Assessment (GIWA). All data and information were prepared in close collaboration with the GIWA Black Sea team and the GIWA secretariat. The graphics were never not used in this form in the final report on the Black Sea, published in 2005.
10 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Distribution of pollutant loads in the Black Sea Distribution of pollutant loads in the Black Sea
Illustration in a set of graphics prepared for a pilot assessment report on the Black Sea drainage basin, for the UNEP Global Impact on Waters Assessment (GIWA). All data and information were prepared in close collaboration with the GIWA Black Sea team and the GIWA secretariat. The graphics were not used in this form in the final report on the Black Sea, published in 2005.
01 Oct 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Global fertilizer consumption Global fertilizer consumption
In recent years, there has been concern that the quantity of mineral fertilizers used in agriculture having adverse effects on the environment. Attention has been drawn to the fact that when nutrients are applied to crops they are not all taken up by the plants immediately. There is also concern that some farmers might be applying inappropriate quantities of fertilizer. The main fertilizers having adverse effects on the environment are nitrate, p...
28 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Nitrate in major rivers Nitrate in major rivers
Considering the data for all the rivers at the continental level, there has been little change in nitrate (NO3-N) concentrations between the two decades under comparison. Changes in the median value were not statistically significant. European rivers showed the highest nitrate loads transported to the marine environment. Comparing data from the two decades, North American and European rivers have remained fairly stable, while major river basins i...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Nitrate levels: concentrations at river mouths Nitrate levels: concentrations at river mouths
Nutrients are essential to life. In aquatic systems, nitrogen and phosphorus are the two nutrients that most commonly control the growth of aquatic plants, algae and bacteria. Nitrogen and phosphorus are considered to be the primary drivers of eutrophication of aquatic ecosystems, where increased nutrient concentrations lead to increased primary productivity. Some systems are naturally eutrophic, whereas others have become eutrophic as a result o...
26 Jan 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz
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When the city harms its own water resources When the city harms its own water resources
In areas where surface water is not readily available (located far from areas of need), groundwater is the primary water source. Groundwater aquifers supply an estimated 20% of the global population living in arid and semi-arid regions. Despite their widespread presence, groundwater aquifers in arid areas receive only limited or seasonal recharge, making such aquifers susceptible to rapid depletion. The Northern Sahara Basin Aquifer, for example,...
01 Oct 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz
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