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Projected trends in regional municipal waste generation Projected trends in regional municipal waste generation
Municipal waste is everything collected and treated by municipalities. Only part of it is comes from households, the rest is generated by small businesses, commercial and other municipal activities. So it is produced from both consumption and production processes. Like all waste, municipal waste is on the rise and it is growing faster than the population, a natural result of our increasing consumption rate and the shortening of product life-spans...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Packaging production and recycling: selected European countries Packaging production and recycling: selected European countries
Recycling activities are economically important. Collection, sorting and reprocessing represent job opportunities (especially in the paper recycling sector). They also lower energy and municipal waste disposal costs. Recycling and reprocessing are growth industries, which also support some downstream sectors like the steel industry.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Percentage of the population served by municipal waste services Percentage of the population served by municipal waste services
Waste collection is a basic public service performed for everyone in OECD countries. Everyone? Well, a closer look reveals that this is not the case for a significant number of people. If these developed countries can’t collect all their waste, imagine the situation in many developing countries, where resources are much scarcer and access is sometimes problematic. This graphic presents the situation in selected OECD countries, highlighting a numb...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Municipal solid waste composition: for 7 OECD countries and 7 Asian cities Municipal solid waste composition: for 7 OECD countries and 7 Asian cities
In most countries in the world, organic materials and paper are the main contributors to municipal waste. In developing countries, large cities generate most of the municipal waste. Data are rarely available for rural areas, but factors like the type of energy source used for cooking and heating and seasonal differences play a part in the composition of waste (for example in rural communities in Mongolia there is a large difference between the vo...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Municipal solid waste generation for selected large cities in Asia Municipal solid waste generation for selected large cities in Asia
Municipal waste is everything collected and treated by municipalities. Only part of it is comes from households, the rest is generated by small businesses, commercial and other municipal activities. So it is produced from both consumption and production processes. Like all waste, municipal waste is on the rise and it is growing faster than the population, a natural result of our increasing consumption rate and the shortening of product life-spans...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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What is in a Swiss rubbish bag? (household waste) What is in a Swiss rubbish bag? (household waste)
The amount and composition of municipal waste depends on a variety of factors. It is related to our living standard but wealth does not explain everything. It is also correlated with levels of urbanization, energy choices, waste management strategies and the “good” or “bad” habits of consumers. Although our garbage bins represent only a small part of the total waste generated, it is an important part: the one in which everyone can take action. Th...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Hong Kong municipal waste composition Hong Kong municipal waste composition
As 1.3 billion Chinese thunder into the great pleasures of consumption, municipal waste is certainly a major environmental concern. This graph shows the amount of waste from 1991 to 2003 in Hong Kong.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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The richer we get, the more we discard - human consumption, waste and living standards The richer we get, the more we discard - human consumption, waste and living standards
According to various scenarios, the economic development (presented in this graphic as Gross Domestic Product, GDP) will most likely continue for the next decades – but at a slower pace for those countries that can afford advanced waste management strategies. As 1.3 billion Chinese thunder into the great pleasures of consumption, municipal waste is certainly a major environmental concern.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Changing percentages of selected municipal wastes Changing percentages of selected municipal wastes
Municipal waste is everything collected and treated by municipalities. Only part of it is comes from households, the rest is generated by small businesses, commercial and other municipal activities. A typical trend: as countries get richer, the organic share decreases whereas the paper and plastic ones increase.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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What is e-waste? What is e-waste?
A growing share of municipal waste contains electronic or electric products. E-waste is one of the fastest growing waste streams and makes up approximately 4 per cent of municipal waste in the European Union. In the US, between 14 and 20 million PC’s become obsolete every year. The picture is similar all over the world and e-waste is increasing steadily.
15 Dec 2006 - by Claudia Heberlein
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Waste scavengers of Buenos Aires Waste scavengers of Buenos Aires
In Buenos Aires informal waste collectors recover 9 to 17 per cent of municipal waste, representing an estimated saving for the municipality of US$30 000 to US$70 000 a day or US$3.5 to US$7 per collector. Scavenger households earn an average of US$58.4 a week. Despite their role in the economy, the working conditions of Buenos Aires cartoneros and their counterparts in other cities in the developing world are very poor, working mainly at ni...
15 Dec 2006 - by Stéphane Kluser
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Nitrate levels: concentrations at river mouths Nitrate levels: concentrations at river mouths
Nutrients are essential to life. In aquatic systems, nitrogen and phosphorus are the two nutrients that most commonly control the growth of aquatic plants, algae and bacteria. Nitrogen and phosphorus are considered to be the primary drivers of eutrophication of aquatic ecosystems, where increased nutrient concentrations lead to increased primary productivity. Some systems are naturally eutrophic, whereas others have become eutrophic as a result o...
26 Jan 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz
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