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Transportation network in the Caucasus ecoregion Transportation network in the Caucasus ecoregion
Transportation routes through mountain regions have always been of vital importance not just for mountain dwellers but also for traders between regions. In the Caucasus, transport routes are of immense importance as they connect Asia and Europe and facilitate the transportation of crucial industrial inputs from one continent to the other. Increase in freight transportation occurred between the 1970s and 1980s and regained momentum in the late 199...
29 Jan 2008 - by Manana Kurtubadze
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West Stara Planina Mountains West Stara Planina Mountains
In 2006, the Stara Planina Euroregion was established to foster trans-boundary cooperation between border municipalities in Serbia and Bulgaria, and assist governments with planning, and implementing cooperation and regional development policies.
08 Feb 2008 - by UNEP/DEWA/GRID-Europe
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Charcoal illegal trade Charcoal illegal trade
As valuable timber becomes rare outside of parks, militias enter parks and illegally cut and produce charcoal inside parks – even the best protected park of the Virungas housing large shares of the Worlds remaining mountain gorilla popula- tion. Rangers here destroyed over a thousand kilns for charcoal inside the park in 2009.
01 Mar 2010 - by Riccaro Pravettoni
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Compensation for sheep losses in Norway Compensation for sheep losses in Norway
Minimizing conflicts with livestock husbandry is the most important challenge for the conservation of wolverines. In Fennoscandia, few areas exist within the wolverines’ range where there is no conflict potential with sheep and/or domestic reindeer. For example in Norway, the practice is to leave sheep unattended on mountain pastures to graze during summer. Higher stock numbers and the loss of herding and livestock guarding traditions have increa...
01 Nov 2010 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Sea level rise caused by the melting of mountain and subpolar glaciers Sea level rise caused by the melting of mountain and subpolar glaciers
Another process that results in rising sea levels is the addition of water mass from land ice. Melting glaciers and ice caps, as well as the vast ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica, raise sea-levels if their water mass enters the ocean as melted water or icebergs (Pritchard et al. 2009, Steig et al. 2009, Velicogna 2009). Furthermore, it is estimated that melting of tropical glaciers (most of them are considered small) could cause an increas...
22 Nov 2010 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Rapid decline of the San Quintin glacier, Northern Patagonia Rapid decline of the San Quintin glacier, Northern Patagonia
Glaciers grow and retreat at intervals depending on changes in local climate, and local variations in temperature and precipitation play a particularly important role in this. Retreating and diminishing mountain glaciers all over the world, except in the Antarctica, indicate a general trend of global warming. In addition to its rapid decrease in size, the San Quintín glacier located in North Patagonia, Chile, has also been exhibiting cracks and f...
22 Nov 2010 - by Viktor Novikov, Zoï Environment
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Belarus, Moldova and Ukraine: forest cover Belarus, Moldova and Ukraine: forest cover
There is not a lot of forest coverage in the area. Most of the region consists of plain and lowland, wooded as in Belarus and northern Ukraine, or open steppe as elsewhere. Forests are concentrated in the relatively small mountain regions on the edges of Eastern Europe: in the Carpathians and Crimea.
01 Nov 2007 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Glacier cumulative mass balance Glacier cumulative mass balance
Compilation of available data (Fig. 1) shows that most mountain glaciers are losing mass, and that the overall rate of mass loss has increased in the last decade. For the last decade the highest mass loss per unit area has been observed in the European Alps, Patagonia, Alaska, and north-western USA/south-western Canada (Kaser et al., 2006, Lemke et al., 2007, Arendt et al., 2009).
06 Dec 2010 - by Riccardo Pravettoni
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Glacier recession and expansion in Hindu Kush-Himalayas and Central Asia Glacier recession and expansion in Hindu Kush-Himalayas and Central Asia
Averaged over their entire areas, within the period 1960– 2003 glaciers in Patagonia and Alaska have thinned by ap- proximately 35 m and 25 m, respectively, whereas high mountain glaciers in Asia have thinned by over 10 m. Data for Patagonia and Alaska are computed from glacier surface elevations for dozens of glaciers. In many other high moun- tain environments such as the Himalayas and the high Andes, where data are limited due to bo...
06 Dec 2010 - by Riccardo Pravettoni
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Elevation Elevation
The Bukit Barisan mountain range that runs down the full length of Sumatra reach altitudes of over 3,000 meters above sea level (m asl), with the highest peaks being Gunung Kerinci in West Sumatra (3,800 m asl) and Gunung Leuser (3,404 m asl) in Aceh. Sumatran orangutan habitat is primarily in lowland areas. The highest densities are found below 500 m asl, but individuals can still be encountered on occasion as high as 2,000 m asl.
13 Sep 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Snow Leopard range in Asia Snow Leopard range in Asia
The Snow Leopard inhabits the alpine and sub-alpine regions of Asia’s most spectacular mountain ranges. Occupying nearly 2 million km2, the snow leopard’s range extends across 12 range states from Russia and Mongolia to Nepal and Bhutan. Unfortunately this magnificent predator had to be listed as Endangered by the World Conservation Union (IUCN). As few as 3,500–7,000 cats may remain in the wild and the population is thought to be dwindling acr...
15 Nov 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Gender division of labour in agriculture and household activities - Nepal and India Gender division of labour in agriculture and household activities - Nepal and India
In Nepal, the gender division of labour is highly skewed, especially when agricultural, pastoral and wage labour is combined with household, community and casual labour, and when high rates of men’s out-migration to urban cities, towns and cross-border destinations in the region and beyond, are considered. Recent comparative research on the ‘feminisation’ of agriculture and natural resource management, undertaken by ICIMOD and supported by I...
05 Dec 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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