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Tag: Marine mammal

Historical decline of the Caspian seal (Pusa caspica) Historical decline of the Caspian seal (Pusa caspica)
It is unclear how many seals remain in the Caspian Sea. From a population estimated at more than one million in the early years of the twentieth century, population estimates now vary between 110 000 and 350 000. For more than 100 years, hunting of seal pups was carried out in the frozen North Caspian area each winter. In the early twentieth century, nearly 100 000 seals were hunted each year; later a quota was set at 40,000 pups per year, furt...
17 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Estimated potential yearly whale watching revenue Estimated potential yearly whale watching revenue
The value of marine recreational activities was calculated by Cisneros-Montemayor & Sumaila (2010). A database of reported expenditure on marine recreational activities was compiled for 144 coastal countries, with the authors estimating that in 2003, nearly 60 million recreational anglers around the world generated a total of about US$40 billion in expenditure, supporting over 950 000 jobs. Hoyt (2001) estimated that over 13 million people worldw...
16 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Protected Areas in the Arctic Protected Areas in the Arctic
Protected areas have long been viewed as a key element for maintaining and conserving Arctic biodiversity and the functioning landscapes upon which species depend. Arctic protected areas have been established in strategically important and representative areas, helping to maintain crucial ecological features, e.g., caribou migration and calving areas, shorebird and waterfowl staging and nesting sites, seabird colonies, and critical components of ...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
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Protected Areas in the Arctic by IUCN category Protected Areas in the Arctic by IUCN category
Protected areas have long been viewed as a key element for maintaining and conserving Arctic biodiversity and the functioning landscapes upon which species depend. Arctic protected areas have been established in strategically important and representative areas, helping to maintain crucial ecological features, e.g., caribou migration and calving areas, shorebird and waterfowl staging and nesting sites, seabird colonies, and critical components of ...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
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Protected areas and World Heritage sites in the Arctic (CAFF area) Protected areas and World Heritage sites in the Arctic (CAFF area)
Protected areas have long been viewed as a key element for maintaining and conserving Arctic biodiversity and the functioning landscapes upon which species depend. Arctic protected areas have been established in strategically important and representative areas, helping to maintain crucial ecological features, e.g., caribou migration and calving areas, shorebird and waterfowl staging and nesting sites, seabird colonies, and critical components of ...
01 Oct 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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