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Coastal regions with observations of dense shelf water flushing Coastal regions with observations of dense shelf water flushing
Knowledge and mapping of these processes is still scarce due to uneven research effort. The map shows sites with known dense shelf water cascading phenomena, which often may involve the 'flushing' effect. It is most likely that this phenomenon is also active off the coast of Alaska, Chile, Argentina and West and southern Africa and in parts of the Indian Ocean. Dense shelf water cascading is highly sensitive to increases in temperature, and hence...
01 Feb 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Poverty mapping study area Poverty mapping study area
This map represents the study area for the poverty mapping project for West Africa for generation of reliable statistical and cartographic products to communicate the relationship between rural poverty and land use potential in West Africa, in order to provide information to ensure optimal use of research investment.
04 Oct 2005 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Poverty mapping study area Poverty mapping study area
This map represents the study area for the poverty mapping project for West Africa for generation of reliable statistical and cartographic products to communicate the relationship between rural poverty and land use potential in West Africa, in order to provide information to ensure optimal use of research investment.
07 Oct 2005 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Marine, coastal, and island systems Marine, coastal, and island systems
Marine systems are the world’s oceans. For mapping purposes, the map shows ocean areas where the depth is greater than 50 meters. Global fishery catches from marine systems peaked in the late 1980s and are now declining despite increasing fishing effort.
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Urban, dryland, and polar systems Urban, dryland, and polar systems
Urban systems are built environments with a high human density. For mapping purposes, the MA uses known human settlements with a population of 5,000 or more, with boundaries delineated by observing persistent night-time lights or by inferring areal extent in the cases where such observations are absent.
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Poverty mapping study area Poverty mapping study area
This map represents the study area for the poverty mapping project for West Africa for generation of reliable statistical and cartographic products to communicate the relationship between rural poverty and land use potential in West Africa, in order to provide information to ensure optimal use of research investment.
11 Feb 2008 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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World poverty distribution World poverty distribution
Three-quarters of all poor people still live in rural areas. They are heavily reliant on natural resources for their livelihoods: soil, water, forests and fisheries underpin commercial and subsistence activities and often provide a safety net to the poor in times of crises. These natural resources which are abundant in many developing countries - represent an important asset and potential wealth for poor people and their communities. As many of t...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Places named by inuinnait toponyms in the regions covered by maps at a scale of 1:50,000 Places named by inuinnait toponyms in the regions covered by maps at a scale of 1:50,000
Place names, which are part of the Inuit Oral tradition, are closely related to the stories that also make up Oral tradition. Indeed, many stories are linked to special places, which are mentioned when a story is told. This is illustrated by the mapping of Inuinnnait place names mentioned in the stories of the Oral tradition as it was recorded by Diamond Jenness in 1914-1916, Knud Rasmussen in 1923 and Maurice Métayer (OMI) in 1958.
21 Mar 2006 - by Beatrice Collignon, Sorbonne University
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Seasonal alternation of the Kangiryuarmiut (early 20th century) Seasonal alternation of the Kangiryuarmiut (early 20th century)
Place names, which are part of the Inuit Oral tradition, are closely related to the stories that also make up Oral tradition. Indeed, many stories are linked to special places, which are mentioned when a story is told. This is illustrated by the mapping of Inuinnnait place names mentioned in the stories of the Oral tradition as it was recorded by Diamond Jenness in 1914-1916, Knud Rasmussen in 1923 and Maurice Métayer (OMI) in 1958.
21 Mar 2006 - by Beatrice Collignon, Sorbonne University
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