Tag: Lead

Water management in Central Asia: state and impact
The graphic shows the effects of the shrinking of the Aral sea, and related issues, on both population migration, and environmental impacts in other areas. It also shows other water problems that could lead to tensions a...
11 Feb 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
World ocean thermohaline circulation
The global conveyor belt thermohaline circulation is driven primarily by the formation and sinking of deep water (from around 1500m to the Antarctic bottom water overlying the bottom of the ocean) in the Norwegian Sea. W...
01 Jun 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Example of enhanced water levels produced from river ice, Liard River, Canada
The lower curve shows the correspondence between river flow and water levels under open-water conditions. The much greater maximum water levels possible under ice-jam conditions are illustrated by the upper curve. The t...
01 Jun 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Millennium Ecosystem Assessment conceptual framework
International demand for timber may lead to a regional loss of forest cover, which increases flood magnitude along a local stretch of a river. Similarly, the interactions can take place across different time scales. Acti...
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
World's top seed companies
The top ten seed companies have incomes at over $10 billion USD. Monsanto and Dupont/Pioneer lead the way with over 50% of seed sales in the world. All of the top ten companies are located in the U.S.A, Japan or Europe.
03 Jan 2008 - by IAASTD/Ketill Berger, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Trends in real commodity prices
Agriculture is a fundamental instrument for sustainable development; about 70% of the world’s poor are rural and most are involved in farming. National policy needs to arrive at a balance between a higher prices which ca...
03 Jan 2008 - by IAASTD/Ketill Berger, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Natural resources - minerals
In more than hundred countries around the world, miners dig minerals and metals out of the ground, satisfying a slowly but continuously increasing demand from industrial production, agriculture, construction, high-tech s...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Forest vs. Agriculture – the case of the Mabira forest reserve, Uganda
The Mabira forest reserve, on the shores of Lake Victoria hosts valuable wildlife, serves as a timber resource, provides ecosystem services for the water balance and the rainforests represents a tourist destination. Foll...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Temperature increases in the Antarctic due to climate change, 2090 (NCAR-CCM3, SRES A2 experiment)
Climate change, due to increased concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, has not lead as clear changes in the Antarctic as in the Arctic. Some of the ice shelves of the Antarctic peninsula have split up and...
31 Jul 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Projected temperature increases in the Arctic due to climate change, 2090 (NCAR-CCM3, SRES A2 experiment)
Climate change, due to increased concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, has lead to increased temperatures and large scale changes in the Arctic. The Arctic sea ice is decreasing, permafrost thawing and th...
31 Jul 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Trends in productivity 1981-2003 (greening and land degradation)
Unsustainable practices in irrigation and production may lead to increased salinization of soil, nutrient depletion and erosion. An estimated 950 million ha of salt-affected lands occur in arid and semi-arid regions, ...
02 Feb 2009 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Disappearing lakes - Old Crow Basin, Canada (1951-2001)
The Arctic contains a variety of types of lakes but overall, it is thermokarst lakes and ponds that are the most abundant and productive aquatic ecosystems in the Arctic. They are found extensively in the lowland regions...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
Disappearing Arctic lakes - examples in Siberian lakes, 1973 to 1997
The Arctic contains a variety of types of lakes but overall, it is thermokarst lakes and ponds that are the most abundant and productive aquatic ecosystems in the Arctic. They are found extensively in the lowland regions...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
Marine mammals in the Arctic
Seven species of marine mammals live in the Arctic year-round – the bowhead whale, beluga whale, narwhal, ringed seal, beaded seal, walrus, and polar bear - and many more migrate to the Arctic seasonally. Many marine mam...
13 Oct 2010 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Climate impacts and tropical diseases in Colombia
Shows comparative trend between air temperature in Colombia and levels of malaria and dengue fever. When temperatures increase, especially in combination with more precipitation, vector borne diseases like malaria and d...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Traditional practices, infrastructure and development
Indigneous peoples have lived in Arctic for thousands of years, and continue to depend upon the natural resources of the region today. Their traditional subsistence practices include hunting, trapping, fishing and reinde...
21 Mar 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Fishing yield
Three-quarters of the world’s fish stocks are currently exploited to the maximum extent, if not in excess (FAO, 2000). This exploitation has had the following impacts: - A growing variety of fishery products are being e...
26 Jan 2009 - by Phillippe Rekacewicz, February 2006
The disappearance of the Aral Sea
The demise of the Aral Sea in central Asia was caused primarily by the diversion of the inflowing Amu Dar’ya and Syr Dar’ya rivers to provide irrigation water for local croplands. These diversions dramatically reduced th...
26 Jan 2009 - by GRIDA
Nitrate levels: concentrations at river mouths
Nutrients are essential to life. In aquatic systems, nitrogen and phosphorus are the two nutrients that most commonly control the growth of aquatic plants, algae and bacteria. Nitrogen and phosphorus are considered to be...
26 Jan 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz
Human actions leading to coastal degradation
Physical alteration and the destruction of habitats are now considered one of the most significant threats to coastal areas. Half of the world’s wetlands, and even more of its mangrove forests, have been lost over the pa...
26 Jan 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz (Le Monde diplomatique), February 2006
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