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Pressures on the South African coast Pressures on the South African coast
Population growth puts pressure on coastal ecosystems. Increased population means growing demand for land for housing and infrastructure, increased use of living resources for food, and more use of available freshwater resources. The negative environmental impacts of the shipping industry also harm the coastal ecosystem. Impacts from shipping include oil spills and the discharge of ballast water and waste into the sea, which affect the quality of...
21 Jun 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Biodiversity threats Biodiversity threats
South Africa is recognised as the third most megadiverse country in the world. The abundance of biodiversity found within its borders covers an estimated ten per cent of the world’s plant species, seven per cent of all bird, six per cent of all mammal, and five per cent of all reptile species found on the planet. Due to various causes ranging from unsustainable land use and farming practices, to invasion by alien species and climate change, So...
21 Jun 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Wildfires in South Africa Wildfires in South Africa
Wildfires mostly affect rural settlements, but to an increasing degree also urban areas, which have developed in fire-prone areas. The impact of wildfires in natural vegetation on the poorest groups of the population cannot be overstated. Many informal settlements are located in the transition zone between densely settled land and land carrying high fuel loads. If not properly managed such areas pose a high risk of wildfires, which may inflict se...
01 Mar 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Timber concessions Timber concessions
Some timber concessions overlap orangutan habitat in a number of key locations. If left to recover after logging, orangutans will gradually return to former concessions. But if the land is converted to monoculture plantations this will no longer be possible.
13 Sep 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Plantation concessions Plantation concessions
Oil palm plantations depend on the microclimate conditions generated by nearby forests, and the rivers emanating from orangutan habitat. Not all plantations concessions on the map have been cleared and planted yet. The majority of concessions are oil palm, but the map also contains rubber and other plantation crops. The establishment of many of these plantations has resulted in significant losses in orangutan habitat, since they have been created...
13 Sep 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Above-ground carbon-stock density changes Above-ground carbon-stock density changes
In Batang Toru, land use changes and deforestation led to an overall loss of around 10 tonnes of carbon per hectare between 1994 and 2009. Due to its exploitation for the cultivation of oil palm, the peat area of Tripa had to face a much more important decrease of 66 tonnes of carbon per hectare in the time period 1990-2009. In terms of CO2 emissions, it corresponds to an overall emission per year of 634,903 tCO2.
13 Sep 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Land not suitable for major agriculture crops Land not suitable for major agriculture crops
An estimated 88% of Sumatran orangutan habitat is on land classified by Indonesian Government studies (RePPProT) as completely unsuitable for cultivation of major crops such as oil palm, rubber, robusta coffee or cocoa. Only 1.3% of orangutan habitat is deemed ideal for one or more of these crops, while 10.7% could be suitable with significant inputs, such as fertilizer and irrigation.
13 Sep 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Migratory species – running on land Migratory species – running on land
Acknowledging ecological networks and how their disruption may have an impact populations of migratory species is essential for the survival of these species and for fostering international collaboration. This is an overview of selected migratory ranges for ungulates.
15 Nov 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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