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ENSO impact on Southern Africa ENSO impact on Southern Africa
El Niño describes 'the warm phase of a naturally occurring sea surface temperature oscillation in the tropical Pacific Ocean', southern oscillation refers to 'a seesaw shift in surface air pressure at Darwin, Australia and the South Pacific Island of Tahiti' amd La Nina refers to the cooling phase of the same temperature oscillation that causes El Nino. This graphic shows how the El Nino phenomenon changed weather conditions in southern Africa in...
17 May 2005 - by Delphine Digout, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Barents Region, topography and bathmetry Barents Region, topography and bathmetry
The Barents region is in the Arctic and covers the area of Western Russia and the northern areas of Finland, Sweden and Norway. The Barents Sea has an average depth 230 m, bordered by the shelf edge towards the Norwegian Sea in the west, the island of Svalbard (Norway) in the northwest, and the islands of Franz Josef Land and Novaya Zemlya (Russia) in the northeast and east. (Please note that the The Barents Euro-Arctic Council has expanded the m...
04 Oct 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Nuclear activities in the Arctic over the last 50 years Nuclear activities in the Arctic over the last 50 years
Numerous nuclear explosions have taken place in the Arctic. One of the largest military nuclear testing facilities is on the island of Novaya Zemlya, where from 1955 through to 1990 the Soviet Union detonated 88 atmospheric, 29 underground, and 3 underwater nuclear devices. Dozens of civilian 'peaceful nuclear explosions' have also occured in the Russian Arctic, where nuclear bombs were used into the late 1980's for seismic studies, mining, and i...
21 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Barents Region, topography and bathymetry Barents Region, topography and bathymetry
The Barents Region is in the Arctic and covers the area of Western Russia and the northern areas of Finland, Sweden and Norway. The Barents Sea has anaverage depth 230 m, bordered by the shelf edge towards the Norwegian Sea in the west, the island of Svalbard (Norway) in the northwest, and the islands of Franz Josef Land and Novaya Zemlya (Russia) in the northeast and east.
01 Jul 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Barents Region, topography and bathymetry Barents Region, topography and bathymetry
The Barents Region is in the Arctic and covers the area of Western Russia and the northern areas of Finland, Sweden and Norway. The Barents Sea has anaverage depth 230 m, bordered by the shelf edge towards the Norwegian Sea in the west, the island of Svalbard (Norway) in the northwest, and the islands of Franz Josef Land and Novaya Zemlya (Russia) in the northeast and east.
18 Aug 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Barents Region, topography and bathymetry Barents Region, topography and bathymetry
The Barents Region is in the Arctic and covers the area of Western Russia and the northern areas of Finland, Sweden and Norway. The Barents Sea has anaverage depth 230 m, bordered by the shelf edge towards the Norwegian Sea in the west, the island of Svalbard (Norway) in the northwest, and the islands of Franz Josef Land and Novaya Zemlya (Russia) in the northeast and east.
01 Jul 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Sea level rise and assessment of the state of the marine environment Sea level rise and assessment of the state of the marine environment
A significant sea level rise is one of the major anticipated consequences of climate change. This will cause some low-lying coastal areas to become completely submerged, while others will increasingly face short-lived high-water levels. These anticipated changes could have a major impact on the lives of coastal populations. The small island developing states (SIDS) will be especially vulnerable to the effects of sea level rise, and to changes in ...
01 Oct 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz
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Benefits of marine and coastal ecosystems to human wellbeing Benefits of marine and coastal ecosystems to human wellbeing
Besides the well-known economic value of fisheries, there are several other activities generating significant revenues in coastal and marine areas. Tourism has become one of the world’s fastest growing industries, providing a significant proportion of the GDPs of many developing countries. Small island states are particularly reliant on coastal and marine tourism. In the Caribbean, for example, the industry accounts for a quarter of the total eco...
26 Jan 2009 - by Phillippe Rekacewicz, February 2006
3
MSV Partners around the World MSV Partners around the World
Partners include policy and research organisations, non-governmental organisations, indigenous people organisations and communities, multinational bodies and governmental supporters in over 20 Arctic and SIDS (Small Island Developing States) states.
03 Feb 2010 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Land cover change in Batang Toru Land cover change in Batang Toru
Migration from the island of Nias to the West Batang Toru forests over the last two decades has been largely spontaneous. These settlers have opened up primary forests for agriculture and hunt many species of local wildlife, including orangutans. Currently at least eight Nias communities have been established inside the protected forest in the Batang Toru area, leading to the loss of more than 2,200 ha of orangutan forest habitat in specifically ...
13 Sep 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Change in forest cover, 1985-2007 Change in forest cover, 1985-2007
Between 1985 and 2007, 49.3% of all forests on the island were lost. In the provinces of Aceh and North Sumatra the figures were 22.7% and 43.4%, respectively. Most forest loss has occurred in the lowlands, the very areas where orangutan density is highest.
13 Sep 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Iron mine threatens Beluga around Baffin Island Iron mine threatens Beluga around Baffin Island
A large iron mine, operated by the Baffinland Iron Mines Corporation, has now been proposed in Baffin Island, with possibly severe impacts on wildlife on the island, such as development across the calving grounds of the caribou, and the establishment of two major ports. A 149 kilometres railway is planned, 100 kilometres of roads, 83 quarries (producing ca. 29,500,000 tons), and in an operation phase with an estimated traffic of 110 trucks per da...
06 May 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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