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Artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM) Artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM)
Mercury residues from mining and industrial processing, as well as mercury in waste, have resulted in a large number of contaminated sites all over the world. Polluted soil can contain as much as 400 grammes of mercury per hectare, as measured at a Venezuelan gold mining site (Garcia-Sanchez et al., 2006). Most mercury contamination sites are concentrated in the industrial areas of North America, Europe and Asia; and in sub-Saharan Africa and Sou...
11 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Regional mercury emissions in 2010 Regional mercury emissions in 2010
Global emissions of mercury to the air in 2010 from human activities were estimated at 1,960 tonnes. Although it is difficult to compare emissions estimates for individual years, total anthropogenic emissions of mercury to the atmosphere appear to have been relatively stable from 1990 to 2010 (UNEP, 2013). There has been a large shift in regional patterns, however. Economic growth has driven an increase in anthropogenic emissions in Southern and ...
11 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Industrial processes: input and output of mercury Industrial processes: input and output of mercury
Socio-economic conditions are often barriers to the adoption of better practices (UNEP, 2012). This figure shows the inputs and outputs of mercury by industries.
11 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Global mercury demand in 2011 Global mercury demand in 2011
In 2011, the largest demands in mercury were artisanal & small-scale gold mining as well as vinyl chloride monomers.
11 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Global mercury consumption in 2005 Global mercury consumption in 2005
Most of the world’s estimated 600,000 tonnes of mercury de- posits are found in a handful of countries, including China, Kyrgyzstan, Mexico, Peru, Russia, Slovenia, Spain and Ukraine (USGS, 2012). Primary mining (where mercury is the target ore, not extracted as a byproduct) is now limited to even fewer countries, with only one (Kyrgyzstan) still exporting. Given present trends, it appears likely that most uses of mercury will continue to decl...
11 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Overview of the Rosia Montana planned mining facilities (Romania) Overview of the Rosia Montana planned mining facilities (Romania)
The Rosia Montana gold and silver mining project in Romania's Apuseni Mountains has been in and out of the environmental headlines in recent years. It is a fascinating case of the new market economy trying to conduct a dirty old industrial activity in a completely new and much cleaner way – at least in Romania.
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Stephane Kluser, Matthias Beilstein, Ieva Rucevska, Cecile Marin, Otto Simonett
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Climate change and natural disaster impacts in the Ferghana Valley Climate change and natural disaster impacts in the Ferghana Valley
Central Asia is a disaster-prone area, exposed to various natural hazards such as floods, droughts, avalanches, rockslide and earthquakes. It is also vulnerable to man-made disasters related to industrial activity and the radioactive and chemical dumps inherited from the Soviet period. Several factors - population density in disaster-prone areas, high overall population growth, poverty, land and water use, failure to comply with building codes an...
16 Mar 2006 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Towns and industrial activities in the Arctic Towns and industrial activities in the Arctic
The Arctic is home to approximately 4 million people, with the share of indigenous and non-indigenous populations varying widely between the Arctic states. Larger settlements are usually located in resource-strategic positions. Rich deposits of natural resources are spurring industrial activity in the region. The Russian Arctic, for example, holds 1.5 of the country’s population, but accounts for 11% of its gross domestic product and 22% of its e...
13 Oct 2010 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Industrial areas and seasonal zones of oxygen depleted waters Industrial areas and seasonal zones of oxygen depleted waters
This graphic illustrates the strong link between areas with high densities of industrial activity and zones of seasonally oxygen-depleted waters. There is a strong link between areas with high densities of industrial activity and zones of seasonal oxygen-depleted waters. In recent years there has been an increasing focus on treating and reducing municipal and industrial waste, and on reducing nitrogen levels in agricultural runoff. However, less...
26 Jan 2009 - by Phillipe Rekacewicz, (Le Monde diplomatique) February 2008
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