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Income increases, MACH sites Income increases, MACH sites
From the start, the income in the project sites have increased continously through the community management of the wetland areas. In addition, activities such as micro-credit support to reduce the depenency on the wetlands have created other income sources, such as farming and small businesses.
11 Jul 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Household income by source, Masvingo province, Zimbabwe Household income by source, Masvingo province, Zimbabwe
A study of households (rich and poor) in the Masvingo Province in southeastern Zimbabwe provides a good example of how agricultural income complements wild income and how it compares with other income sources such as wages and remittances. Agricultural income—from crops and home gardens—contributed 30 percent of total household income (cash and subsistence income combined). Livestock rearing—a modified form of agriculture that relies on wild fora...
11 Jul 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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MACH micro-credit in Bangladesh, increase in borrowers and average income MACH micro-credit in Bangladesh, increase in borrowers and average income
MACH micro-credit in Bangladesh, increase in borrowers and average income
11 Jul 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Micro-credit support and income, MACH project Micro-credit support and income, MACH project
To provide alternative livelihoods for poor households, the MACH project has set up a micro-credit scheme to support other enterprises, such as poultry or livestock or skills development. In 2005, there were 4000 households taking advantage of the scheme, and exhibiting significant increases in income, while reducing the dependency on fisheries.
11 Jul 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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The composition and levels of wealth per capita for low-income countries The composition and levels of wealth per capita for low-income countries
In low-income countries, the natural section represents a quarter of the total wealth, this represents the land that is managed either by household, individual or communally, and the potential for generating income. Physical capital, represents a much smaller share as people will have less potential, compared to higher income countries, to acquire equipment, structures and infrastructure.
11 Jul 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Poverty in Guatemala - rural and urban differences, 2000 and 2002 Poverty in Guatemala - rural and urban differences, 2000 and 2002
Guatemala, a country of 13 million inhabitants in Central America with some 30% of the population living in poverty. Despite economic growth, many social problems remain in Guatemala - one of the 10 poorest countries in Latin America. The distribution of income is highly unequal and there are vast differences in poverty and livelihoods between urban and rural areas, as presented in this figure. The classes in this figure represent: the 'extreme p...
11 Jul 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Income from participants in the MACH study, Bangladesh Income from participants in the MACH study, Bangladesh
Income from participants in the MACH study, Bangladesh
11 Jul 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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India, income from crops India, income from crops
India, income from crops, irrigation case study etc
11 Jul 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Gross National Income (GNI): Belarus, Moldova, Ukraine Gross National Income (GNI): Belarus, Moldova, Ukraine
Though expanding, the region’s economies still lag behind most of their neighbours, with Moldova one of the poorest European countries in terms of per capita GDP. All the countries suffered economic decline in the 1990s followed by some recovery over the last five to ten years (see GNI figure).
01 Nov 2007 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Increasing price with volume Increasing price with volume
Rising block tariffs aim to achieve several public policy goals. A low or zero tariff applied to the first block can enhance affordability. For example, Durban, South Africa, provides 25 litres of water a day free of charge - a lifeline to many - with a steep increase above this level. Higher tiers aim at enabling utilities to increase efficiency, by creating disincentives for overuse, and at mobilizing revenues to cover costs. Block tariffs thus...
26 Jan 2009 - by GRID-Arendal
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Cereal productivity in sub-Saharan Africa under a projected Intergovernamental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) scenario Cereal productivity in sub-Saharan Africa under a projected Intergovernamental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) scenario
A majority of the population in sub-Saharan African lives in rural areas, where income and employment depend almost entirely on rain-fed agriculture. This population is today at high risk. Sub-Saharan Africa already has a highly variable and unpredictable climate and is acutely vulnerable to floods and droughts. A third of the people in the region live in drought-prone areas, and floods are a recurrent threat in several countries. With climate ch...
26 Jan 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz
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Poverty and social unrest in South Africa Poverty and social unrest in South Africa
Although the United Nations Development Programme’s (UNDP) Human Development Index ranks South Africa as a middle-income country, the way in which income is distributed across the population is highly skewed. Some 39 per cent of the population, estimated at more than 49 million people, lives on less than R 388 a month. One consequence of poverty and high levels of unemployment is social unrest. A large proportion of South Africa’s poor population...
21 Jun 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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