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Arctic, topography and bathymetry Arctic, topography and bathymetry
The Arctic is extremely diverse in terms of landscapes, varying from pack and drift ice to rugged shores, flat coastal plains, rolling hills and mountains surpassing 6000 metres above sea level (Denali, 6,194 m asl, in sub-arctic and boreal Alaska). The region has rivers and lakes, tundra and the largest forests in the world (the Russian Taiga).
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Permafrost distribution in the Arctic Permafrost distribution in the Arctic
Most of the Arctic is covered by ice and snow for more than eight and even up to twelve months a year, but conditions are highly variable, ranging from snow several metres deep each winter to the polar deserts of northern Greenland with only 50- 100 mm of precipitation annually. A large portion of the Arctic is underlain by permafrost. Permafrost, defined as ground that does not thaw for two or more years, can reach a thickness of up to 1000 metr...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Coastal Arctic food web (drift ice) Coastal Arctic food web (drift ice)
The coastal Arctic food web is closely related to drift ice conditions and seasonal use of shorelines by both terrestrial and sea mammals. Numerous species depend upon each other and the transport of food to and from the marine areas to the coast and inland. Indigenous peoples use most of the food chain and traditionally use both environments for hunting, fishing and gathering.
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Projected changes in the Arctic climate, 2090 Projected changes in the Arctic climate, 2090
The averages of the scenarios in the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA) are presented in this figure, for the year 2090, with the surface temperatures over land, the size of the polar ice cap, and the outer limits of permafrost.
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Industrial development in the Arctic Industrial development in the Arctic
Industrial development in the Arctic. The Arctic has been opened up for increased exploration of petroleum, gas and mining activities. The Barents Sea, the Mackenzie Valley in Canada and the Alaskan North Slope, are the areas of chief interest at the moment. Please note that the shipping routes in Northern Canada are not open today for commercial shipping because of sea ice. The Northern Sea Route north of Russia is partly open today.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Satellite observations in Arctic sea ice, 1979 and 2003 Satellite observations in Arctic sea ice, 1979 and 2003
This oblique view of the Arctic polar ice cap in September shows the significant reduction that has happened over a time period just over 20 years, from 1979 to 2003. Future predicitions shows even more drastic reduction of the ice cap, thus opening new area for natural resources extraction and marine transports. Please also see an updated graphic at: http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/arctic-sea-ice-minimum-extent-in-september-1982-2005-and-2007
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Dates of river ice break-up in the Arctic Dates of river ice break-up in the Arctic
Dates of river ice break-up in the Arctic
21 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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How much sea ice will be left in 2050? How much sea ice will be left in 2050?
Climate simulations suggest continued rapid loss of Arctic sea-ice. The observations of indigenous peoples also indicate unprecedented change. The loss of the Arctic sea-ice will have vast impacts on climate, livelihoods and biodiversity.
21 Mar 2006 - by Author: K. Dixon & H. Vahlenkamp, October 1998, December 1999, February 2004; Layout: Petter Sevaldsen (UNEP/GRID-Arendal)
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Unalakleet community in Alaska Unalakleet community in Alaska
Location and Climate: Unalakleet is a small coastal community on Norton Sound, at the mouth of the Unalakleet River, 395 miles northwest of Anchorage, Alaska. Unalakleet has a sub-Arctic climate with considerable influence of the nearby sea when Norton Sound is ice-free, usually from May to October. Winters are cold and dry.
21 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Dates of river ice freeze-up in the Arctic Dates of river ice freeze-up in the Arctic
Presenting the relative dates of river freeze-up in the Arctic and the climatic condititions surrounding that, thus outlining the relative changes in temperature and conditions throughout the circumpolar Arctic.
21 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Projected changes in Arctic pack ice Projected changes in Arctic pack ice
The averages of the scenarios in the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA) for the Arctic pack ice sheet (the permanent ice) are presented in this map, with the successive decrease in the ice up to 2090.
18 Aug 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Arctic, topography and bathymetry Arctic, topography and bathymetry
The Arctic is extremely diverse in terms of landscapes, varying from pack and drift ice to rugged shores, flat coastal plains, rolling hills and mountains surpassing 6000 metres above sea level (Denali, 6,194 m asl, in sub-arctic and boreal Alaska). The region has rivers and lakes, tundra and the largest forests in the world (the Russian Taiga).
18 Aug 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Projected changes in Arctic pack ice Projected changes in Arctic pack ice
The averages of the scenarios in the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA) for the Arctic pack ice sheet (the permanent ice) are presented in this map, with the successive decrease in the ice up to 2090.
01 Jul 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Arctic, topography and bathymetry Arctic, topography and bathymetry
The Arctic is extremely diverse in terms of landscapes, varying from pack and drift ice to rugged shores, flat coastal plains, rolling hills and mountains surpassing 6000 metres above sea level (Denali, 6,194 m asl, in sub-arctic and boreal Alaska). The region has rivers and lakes, tundra and the largest forests in the world (the Russian Taiga).
01 Jul 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Sea level rise and assessment of the state of the marine environment Sea level rise and assessment of the state of the marine environment
A significant sea level rise is one of the major anticipated consequences of climate change. This will cause some low-lying coastal areas to become completely submerged, while others will increasingly face short-lived high-water levels. These anticipated changes could have a major impact on the lives of coastal populations. The small island developing states (SIDS) will be especially vulnerable to the effects of sea level rise, and to changes in ...
01 Oct 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz
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A World of Salt A World of Salt
Global water type by percentage. Estimates of global water resources based on several different calculation methods have produced varied estimates. Shiklomanov in Gleick (1993) estimated that: - The total volume of water on earth is 1.4 billion km3. - The volume of freshwater resources is 35 million km3, or about 2.5% of the total volume. Of these, 24 million km3 or 68.9% is in the form of ice and permanent snow cover in mountainous regions, a...
26 Jan 2009 - by Phillippe Rekacewicz, February 2006
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Freshwater resources: volume by continent Freshwater resources: volume by continent
Glaciers and ice caps cover about 10% of the world’s landmass. These are concentrated in Greenland and Antarctica and contain 70% of the world’s freshwater. Unfortunately, most of these resources are located far from human habitation and are not readily accessible for human use. According to the United States Geological Survey (USGS), 96% of the world’s frozen freshwater is at the South and North Poles, with the remaining 4% spread over 550,000 k...
01 Oct 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz (Le Monde diplomatique)
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Sea Ice Anomaly in Northern Hemisphere Sea Ice Anomaly in Northern Hemisphere
Arctic sea-ice reductions have significant impacts on climate, wildlife and communities. The opening of open water across the Arctic ocean will have unknown consequences in terms of changes in water circulation and redistribution of species from the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. As sea ice coverage declines, albedo diminishes and more radiation is absorbed by the sea water, in a feed-back process that enhances warming and melting sea ice.
06 Oct 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Sea Level Anomalies Sea Level Anomalies
Melting and warming will have consequences on ocean circulation. Additionally melting of inland glaciers and continental ice sheets on Greenland and Antarctica, and the thermal expansion of ocean waters are causing sea level rise.
06 Oct 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Global sea-level rise Global sea-level rise
According to the 2007 IPCC report, global average sea level rise will vary from 18 cm to 59 cm by 2100. The IPCC models did not account for the accelerated melting of ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica. Some of the latest research, however, estimates a global sea level rise of between 0.6 and 1.2 metres by 2100.
01 Oct 2010 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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