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Rhino, and other wildlife, smuggling routes to and from Nepal Rhino, and other wildlife, smuggling routes to and from Nepal
Rhinos were hunted intensively during the war in Nepal in the early to mid 2000s, with catastrophic effects to habitats such as Bardia National park.
19 Jun 2014 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID Arendal
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The bushmeat chain reaction The bushmeat chain reaction
The illicit bushmeat trade involves a series of underlying socio-economic factors, but leads, with rising population densities, to local depletions of wildlife species, and increasingly inside protected areas.
19 Jun 2014 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID Arendal
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Saiga antelope populations Saiga antelope populations
Saigas have been hunted since prehistoric times and today poaching remains the primary threat to this critically endangered species. Following the collapse of the Soviet Union, Saiga populations crashed by more than 95% within a decade. While a number of Saiga populations are starting to stabalize, three continue to be in a precarious state (North-West Pre-Caspian, Ural and Ustiturt populations).
19 Jun 2014 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID Arendal
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Ratio of protected areas in the Balkans Ratio of protected areas in the Balkans
The Balkans boast an exceptional wealth of biodiversity of flora and fauna. The main threat to species is increasing anthropogenic pressures such as hunting, farming and the collection of medicinal plants. Natural habitats are threatened by unsustainable economic activities in agriculture, illegal logging of forestry, illegal building and serious pollution. This poses several environmental problems such as erosion, a concern for most of the count...
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Stephane Kluser, Matthias Beilstein, Ieva Rucevska, Cecile Marin, Otto Simonett
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Wildlife Smuggling to in and from Nepal Wildlife Smuggling to in and from Nepal
Animals living in the forest are also at risk from poaching and bush-meat hunting. Intelligence gathering, regular mo - n itoring and strict enforcement are effective ways of curtailing both illegal logging and poaching activities in forests. The participation of local communities in these activities can facilitate implementation of laws and regulations and secure sustainability. Customs enforcement also plays a critical role in contro...
20 Jun 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz assisted by Cecile Marin, Agnes Stienne, Guilio Frigieri, Riccardo Pravettoni, Laura Margueritte and Marion Lecoquierre.
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Coastal Arctic food web (drift ice) Coastal Arctic food web (drift ice)
The coastal Arctic food web is closely related to drift ice conditions and seasonal use of shorelines by both terrestrial and sea mammals. Numerous species depend upon each other and the transport of food to and from the marine areas to the coast and inland. Indigenous peoples use most of the food chain and traditionally use both environments for hunting, fishing and gathering.
28 Sep 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Consumption of harvested meat/fish in Inuit Households (Canada) Consumption of harvested meat/fish in Inuit Households (Canada)
The harvest of natural resources is a key feature of traditional lifestyles and economies throughout the Arctic, and a continuing reliance on it as a mainstay of indigenous existence in the north is evident. Environmental change in Arctic regions is a key contributing factor to changing Inuit subsistence patterns. As examples, the Inuit speak of the thinning of the ice which makes hunting more challenging; species they once relied upon are disapp...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
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Trends in local meat-and fish in NWT Trends in local meat-and fish in NWT
The harvest of natural resources is a key feature of traditional lifestyles and economies throughout the Arctic, and a continuing reliance on it as a mainstay of indigenous existence in the north is evident. According to Northwest Territories, Canada (NWT) Labour surveys, about 37–45% of NWT residents went hunting or fishing in 2002. This has changed little since the first survey in 1983, and is high compared to southern Canada. About 40–60% of...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
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Wild food harvests in Alaska by area, 1990s Wild food harvests in Alaska by area, 1990s
The harvest of natural resources is a key feature of traditional lifestyles and economies throughout the Arctic, and a continuing reliance on it as a mainstay of indigenous existence in the north is evident. In Alaska, wild food harvests vary considerably by geographic area. The total harvest has been estimated at about 43.7 million pounds (approximately 19.8 million kg) of wild resources, an average of about 375 pounds (170 kg) per capita. This ...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
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Seal catches in the Arctic Seal catches in the Arctic
Large-scale commercial harvests are restricted to harp and hooded seals, except for the hooded seal population in the Jan Mayen area of the Greenland Sea. Both species faced intense commercial hunting in the 19th and 20th centuries, first for oil, and later mainly for the highly prized pelts of pups.Seal products nowadays also include a significant aphrodisiac trade (particularly for harp seal sex organs), and seal oil has become a popular health...
13 Oct 2010 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Coastal Arctic food web (drift ice) Coastal Arctic food web (drift ice)
The coastal Arctic food web is closely related to drift ice conditions and seasonal use of shorelines by both terrestrial and sea mammals. Numerous species depend upon each other and the transport of food to and from the marine areas to the coast and inland. Indigenous peoples use most of the food chain and traditionally use both environments for hunting, fishing and gathering.
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Economy of the Arctic, by sector Economy of the Arctic, by sector
The largest economies in the Arctic belong to Alaska (US) and Russia, mainly because of mining and petroleum activity. Regions that are still heavily dominated by more traditional subsistence activities, such as hunting and fishing, in Greenland and in Northern Canada, have much lower gross products. Similarly, reindeer herding in Russia and Scandinavia is of substantial importance to the livelihoods and lifestyles of reindeer herders like the Sa...
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Traditional practices, infrastructure and development Traditional practices, infrastructure and development
Indigneous peoples have lived in Arctic for thousands of years, and continue to depend upon the natural resources of the region today. Their traditional subsistence practices include hunting, trapping, fishing and reindeer herding. All of which are conducted in a sustainable manner; that is, in a way that does not lead to long-term or large-scale degredation of the environment. However, the balance they have achieved with the environment through...
21 Mar 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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