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Environmental trends Nordic countries 3 Environmental trends Nordic countries 3
This illustration shows positive and negative developments in areas such as household waste per capita, urban environment Quality, biodiversity and number of private and commercial cars, see the other illustrations in this collection for more information.
13 Feb 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Household survey sites in Sekhukhuneland Household survey sites in Sekhukhuneland
Household survey sites in Sekhukhuneland
07 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Toilets needed to meet the MDG sanitation target by 2015 Toilets needed to meet the MDG sanitation target by 2015
Ensure environmental sustainability goal (goal 7) among the Millennium Development Goals address sanitation, through the target: Halve, by 2015, the proportion of people without sustainable access to safe drinking water and sanitation (target 10). The indicator in this graphic display the current status on one of the indicators for this target as an estimation on the number of toilets per household that needs to be constructed from now (2005) up ...
20 Sep 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Forest Cover in Relation to Poverty Madagascar Forest Cover in Relation to Poverty Madagascar
Even though forests are often very important to households, there is surprisingly little knowledge on the actual level of household forest income and the role of such income in maintaining livelihoods. The evidence regarding the role of forests in allowing households to move out of poverty is scant and mixed; there are examples indicating that income from forests allows households to accumulate assets and escape poverty. However, by wa...
20 Jun 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz assisted by Cecile Marin, Agnes Stienne, Guilio Frigieri, Riccardo Pravettoni, Laura Margueritte and Marion Lecoquierre.
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Export waste as reported by Australia, in tonnes, 2001 Export waste as reported by Australia, in tonnes, 2001
Australia is not a big player in the waste trade, but a good percentage of its exports are shipped all the way to Europe. In 2000 Australia reported the export of 16 689 tonnes of waste (all classifi ed as hazardous) to New Zealand, Belgium, Great Britain, France and Austria. More than half the waste consisted of used lead acid batteries, which were moved across the Tasman Sea to New Zealand. Most of the rest of the waste (described as lead dro...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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What is in a Swiss rubbish bag? (household waste) What is in a Swiss rubbish bag? (household waste)
The amount and composition of municipal waste depends on a variety of factors. It is related to our living standard but wealth does not explain everything. It is also correlated with levels of urbanization, energy choices, waste management strategies and the “good” or “bad” habits of consumers. Although our garbage bins represent only a small part of the total waste generated, it is an important part: the one in which everyone can take action. Th...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Export of waste as reported by Germany, in tonnes, 2001 Export of waste as reported by Germany, in tonnes, 2001
In 2000 Germany reported sending more than threehundred thousand tonnes of waste to 14 countries. All countries appeared to receive a broad combination of hazardous waste apart from China, which received nearly 50 tonnes of household waste. In year 2000, Germany was amongst the top importers, bringing in over 1 million tonnes of waste from 38 countries. Most of the waste came from the Netherlands, Italy, Luxemburg and Belgium and contained a comb...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Import of waste as reported by Australia, in tonnes, 2001 Import of waste as reported by Australia, in tonnes, 2001
In 2000 Australia imported 1600 tonnes of waste from New Zealand, Norway, French Antarctic and South Africa. This included mostly copper and lead compounds from New Zealand, selenium from Norway and household waste from the French Antarctic base.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Import waste as reported by Germany, in tonnes, 2001 Import waste as reported by Germany, in tonnes, 2001
In 2000 Germany reported sending 317 528 tonnes of waste to 14 countries. All countries appeared to receive a broad combination of hazardous waste apart from China, which received nearly 50 tonnes of household waste. During 2000 Germany was amongst the top importers, bringing in over 1 million tonnes of waste from 38 countries. Major flows were from the Netherlands, Italy, Luxemburg and Belgium.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Different sources of danger and their impacts to the environment Different sources of danger and their impacts to the environment
Contaminated groundwater can adversely affect animals, plants and humans if it is removed from the ground by manmade or natural processes. Depending on the geology of the area, groundwater may rise to the surface through springs or seeps, fl ow laterally into nearby rivers, streams, or ponds, or sink deeper into the earth. In many parts of the world, groundwater is pumped out of the ground to be used for drinking, bathing, other household uses, a...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Global CFC production Global CFC production
Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), along with other chlorine- and bromine-containing compounds, have been implicated in the accelerated depletion of ozone in the Earth's stratosphere. CFCs were developed in the early 1930s and are used in a variety of industrial, commercial, and household applications.
28 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Sehukhuneland household surveys Sehukhuneland household surveys
For SEI
28 Sep 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Water towers of Asia - glaciers, water and population in the greater Himalayas-Hindu Kush-Tien Shan-Tibet region Water towers of Asia - glaciers, water and population in the greater Himalayas-Hindu Kush-Tien Shan-Tibet region
The Himalayas–Hindu Kush, Kunlun Shan, Pamir and Tien Shan mountain ranges function as water towers, providing water to people through much of Asia. The glacier-fed rivers originating from the Himalaya mountain ranges surrounding the Tibetan Plateau comprise the largest river run-off from any single location in the world. While the mountains are homes to some 170 million people, the rivers that drain these mountains influence the lives of about 4...
01 Jun 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Turn it off! Turn it off!
Household appliances with a standby mode and CO2 emissions from standby mode. Displayed in million tonnes per year for various countries all around the world.
04 Jun 2008 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Household Waste, Heftingsdalen Household Waste, Heftingsdalen
In 2005 household waste output was up by 10 000 tonnes on 2000, rising from 15 000 to 25 000 tonnes for almost the same population. Nor does this include 20 000 tonnes of business waste (construction, light industry and service sector). In all Heftingsdalen processes about 45 000 tonnes of waste, making an average of 720 kilograms per person per year.
15 Dec 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz
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Japanese household waste composition Japanese household waste composition
One person’s dustbin is not the same as another’s. Depending on which continent you live on, on your life style, financial resources, and so on, your trash will be different. This shows two cases from Japan.
15 Dec 2006 - by Claudia Heberlein, Emmanuelle Bournay
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Global household expenditure Global household expenditure
Several trends characterise modern consumer goods. Our appetite for them continues to grow, with product ranges growing too. Meanwhile the average lifespan of many products is shortening. 80% of what we make is thrown away within six months of production. Each product contains more components and they are usually more difficult to biodegrade than before. All of which complicates the way products are processed once they become waste.
15 Dec 2006 - by Emmanuelle Bournay
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Share of packaging waste in total household waste (OECD) Share of packaging waste in total household waste (OECD)
Once a product is manufactured and ready to be sold, it must be distributed. To protect it from dirt and shocks, to make it easier to store, but also to make it look appealing, a whole science has developed to design the most suitable wrappings. The variety of products demands a huge diversity of packaging and a wide range of materials: cardboard boxes, glass jars, plastic bags, plastic film, aluminium wrappers and expanded polystyrene, to...
15 Dec 2006 - by Emmanuelle Bournay
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Share of food in total household expenses (Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan) Share of food in total household expenses (Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan)
In all the areas bordering on the Caspian, priority must be given to diversifying activities and investment. Particular attention should be given to sectors such as tourism, agriculture and food production as well as services.
29 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Potential environmental hazards in the Caspian Sea Region Potential environmental hazards in the Caspian Sea Region
Oil slicks glittering on the surface of the sea and thousands of hectares of soil penetrated by oil leaking from abandoned wells are just part of the pollution that people living around the Caspian Sea must endure. In addition there are various industries, particularly chemicals and mining, large-scale irrigated farming and untreated household waste. Combined with the effects of the oil, all these forms of pollution have a serious impact on the w...
29 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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