HomeAboutActivitiesMapsPhotosPublicationsNews
 
Home >> Habitat

Tag: Habitat

Land cover change in Batang Toru Land cover change in Batang Toru
Migration from the island of Nias to the West Batang Toru forests over the last two decades has been largely spontaneous. These settlers have opened up primary forests for agriculture and hunt many species of local wildlife, including orangutans. Currently at least eight Nias communities have been established inside the protected forest in the Batang Toru area, leading to the loss of more than 2,200 ha of orangutan forest habitat in specifically ...
13 Sep 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
2
Timber concessions Timber concessions
Some timber concessions overlap orangutan habitat in a number of key locations. If left to recover after logging, orangutans will gradually return to former concessions. But if the land is converted to monoculture plantations this will no longer be possible.
13 Sep 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Forest status Forest status
Most Sumatran orangutan habitat is protected by Indonesian law. The government has created a very comprehensive system of functional forest categories, and institutions responsible for managing its forests. Some areas remain highly threatened, however, including the Batang Toru Forest (production forest), and the Tripa Swamp Forest (not part of the formal forest estate).
01 Mar 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Plantation concessions Plantation concessions
Oil palm plantations depend on the microclimate conditions generated by nearby forests, and the rivers emanating from orangutan habitat. Not all plantations concessions on the map have been cleared and planted yet. The majority of concessions are oil palm, but the map also contains rubber and other plantation crops. The establishment of many of these plantations has resulted in significant losses in orangutan habitat, since they have been created...
13 Sep 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Sites Sites
Sumatran orangutan habitat is restricted to the westernmost tip of Indonesia. Boxes indicate the case study areas Tripa and Batang Toru. The case of Sumatran orangutan serves as a useful example to illustrate how the fate of one of our nearest relatives is closely tied to ours.
13 Sep 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Forest loss from 1985-2007 for Sumatra Forest loss from 1985-2007 for Sumatra
If only the most important orangutan habitat is examined – i.e. forest below 1,000 m – for the 1985-2007 period, the rate of loss was even higher, at 28% and 49% for Aceh and North Sumatra respectively. When only the most species-rich forests (below 500 m) are considered, forest loss between 1985 and 2007 was 36% for Aceh and 61% for North Sumatra. For the carbon-rich peat swamp forests the loss was 33% for Aceh and 78% for North Sumatra.
13 Sep 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Land use values Land use values
The area where orangutans occur can be separated into two main habitat types: forest on peat-lands (Tripa) and forests on mineral soils (Batang Toru), and the results are presented for these types separately. Values for carbon were calculated according to Butler et al. 2009 model using a discount rate of 6.5% and voluntary market prices (mean USD 13.33t/CO2, range USD 9.43-17, forest carbon report). Under the fixed scenario the carbon price remai...
13 Sep 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Conservation areas and the Leuser Ecosystem Conservation areas and the Leuser Ecosystem
Approximately 50% of Sumatran orangutan habitat is inside conservation areas directly managed by the Ministry of Forestry, and 78% lies within the boundaries of the vast Leuser Ecosystem Conservation Area.
13 Sep 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Water catchments Water catchments
Orangutan habitat overlaps the catchments of 44 major rivers in Sumatra, each of which reaches the coast and discharges into the sea. Thus it is very important to guarantee proper functioning of ecosystem services related to water.
13 Sep 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Land not suitable for major agriculture crops Land not suitable for major agriculture crops
An estimated 88% of Sumatran orangutan habitat is on land classified by Indonesian Government studies (RePPProT) as completely unsuitable for cultivation of major crops such as oil palm, rubber, robusta coffee or cocoa. Only 1.3% of orangutan habitat is deemed ideal for one or more of these crops, while 10.7% could be suitable with significant inputs, such as fertilizer and irrigation.
13 Sep 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Administration Administration
Sumatran orangutan habitat overlaps 2 Provinces and 21 Districts, presenting many challenges for integrated development policies. 78% of the species’ present range lies within Aceh, and the remaining 22% in North Sumatra. A total of 13 districts in Aceh, and eight in North Sumatra, contain forests where wild Sumatran orangutans still occur.
13 Sep 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Mining exploration Mining exploration
The mining industry is a potential threat to Sumatran orangutan habitat in a number of important areas, both directly by its own activities and indirectly by road access. It includes a major gold mine near the town of Batang and iron ore mining in the Alas valley, and planned development of coal mining in the hill forests inland of the Tripa swamps.
13 Sep 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Elevation Elevation
The Bukit Barisan mountain range that runs down the full length of Sumatra reach altitudes of over 3,000 meters above sea level (m asl), with the highest peaks being Gunung Kerinci in West Sumatra (3,800 m asl) and Gunung Leuser (3,404 m asl) in Aceh. Sumatran orangutan habitat is primarily in lowland areas. The highest densities are found below 500 m asl, but individuals can still be encountered on occasion as high as 2,000 m asl.
13 Sep 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Migration of grassland birds in America Migration of grassland birds in America
The grasslands of Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay in southern South America represent important habitat to numerous migratory and resident bird species. These birds play vital roles in the ecosystem by dispersing seeds and controlling insect populations. Some species, such as the Buff-breasted Sandpiper (Tryngites subruficollis), migrate some 20,000 km from their breeding grounds along the Arctic coast to their non-breeding rang...
15 Nov 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
5
Previous | 1 2 3 4