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Tag: Greenhouse gas

SLCP Climate Benefit - Avoided Global Warming
Rapid implementation of SLCP mitigation measures, together with measures to reduce CO2 emissions, would greatly improve the chances of keeping the Earth´s temperature increase to less than 2˚C relative to pre-industrial ...
20 Jun 2014 - by GRID-Arendal
SLCP Control Measures
16 cost effective control measures involving technologies and practices that already exist and could significantly reduce SLCP emissions. If implemented globally, these measures could reduce global methane emissions by 4...
20 Jun 2014 - by GRID-Arendal
Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs)
HFCs are man-made fluorinated greenhouse gases rapidly building up in the atmosphere. They are used as replacements for ozone-depleting substances (ODS) in air conditioning, refrigeration, foam-blowing, fire retardants, ...
19 Jun 2014 - by GRID-Arendal
Tropospheric Ozone (O3)
Tropospheric Ozone (O3) is a major air and climate pollutant. It causes warming and is a highly reactive oxidant, harmful to crop production and human health. O3 is known as a `secondary´ pollutant because it is not emit...
19 Jun 2014 - by GRID-Arendal
Methane (CH4)
Approximately 60% of methane is emitted from human activities. Methane is one of the most significant drivers of climate change, as well as the main precursor of tropospheric ozone, a powerful greenhouse gas and air poll...
20 Jun 2014 - by GRID-Arendal
Black Carbon (BC) and Co-pollutants from Incomplete Combustion
Black carbon (or soot) particles are formed from the incomplete combustion of biomass and fossil fuels. It is a powerful climate forcer and dangerous air pollutant. BC and co pollutants make up the majority of PM2.5 air ...
20 Jun 2014 - by GRID-Arendal
The SLCP Opportunity - Benefits of Control Measures
A number of available mitigation options have been identified that if rapidly implemented have the potential to deliver rapid multiple benefits for human well-being by improving air quality and reducing near term global ...
19 Jun 2014 - by GRID-Arendal
The SLCP Challenge
SLCPs are responsible for a substantial fraction of near term climate change, with a particularly large impact on sensitive regions of the world, and have significant detrimental health, agricultural and environmental im...
19 Jun 2014 - by GRID-Arendal
Climate feedbacks - the connectivity of the positive ice/snow albedo feedback, terrestrial snow and vegetation feedbacks and the negative cloud/radiation feedback
Feedback refers to the modification of a process by changes resulting from the process itself. Positive feedbacks accelerate the process, while negative feedbacks slow it down. Part of the uncertainty around future clima...
01 Jun 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Projections to 2020 of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions
The graphic shows emissions of anthropogenic greenhouse gases from 1990 to 1995, with projections to 2020. The main greenhouse gases are CO2, CH4, N2O, HFCs, PFCs and SF6. GLobal warming is largely believed to be the re...
06 Nov 2006 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Kyoto protocol, cost of implementation
The Kyoto Protocol is only a first step towards combating climate change. Drastic reductions of greenhouse gas emissions are required to avoid the most threatening consequences of global warming. Concerns are raised that...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Mitigating climate change: cost in 2050 (out of GDP)
Global average GDP might be reduced by 1–4% if we reduce the emissions of CO2 so that we stabilize the concentration in the atmosphere at 450 ppmv. In 2003 the concentration was 375 ppmv. If we stabilise at higher concen...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Energy consumption, economic development and CO2 emissions; selected Latin America countries
As a rule of thumb, economic growth is closely related to growth in energy consumption because the more energy is used, the higher the economic growth. However, it is possible to decouple energy consumption and economic...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
CH4 emissions in 2000; Latin America and selected countries
Since pre-industrial times, the atmospheric concentration of methane (CH4) has increased by 150%. Methane is a greenhouse gas that has a global warming potential that is 23 times stronger than CO2. (IPCC 2001) In 2000 t...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Change in precipitation for scenarios A2 and B2; Tropical America
When global surface temperatures increase, changes in precipitation and atmospheric moisture are very likely to increase: the hydrological cycle will be more active, and the atmosphere will increase its water holding cap...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
CO2 emissions in the world and in Latin America and the Caribbean
A comparison between the amount of CO2 emissions of the world and latin America and the Caribbean. Since pre-industrial times, the atmospheric concentration of greenhouse gases has grown significantly. The present level...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Tropical hydropower dams as greenhouse sources
Large tropical hydropower reservoirs in Latin America may have a potential adverse impact on the climatic system through releasing greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Submerging large areas of land and tropical vegetat...
17 May 2005 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
CO2 emissions per person in Latin America and the Caribbean compared to the world and OECD average emissions
Emissions of greenhouse gases are on the increase around the world, contributing to man-made global warming and climate change. This graphic displays greenhouse gas emissions per capita in Latin America and the Caribbean...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
N2O emissions in 2000; Latin America and selected countries
Since pre-industrial times, the atmospheric concentration of nitrous oxide (N2O) has increased by 16%. Nitrous oxide is a greenhouse gas that has a global warming potential that is 296 times stronger than CO2. In 2000 t...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Sea level rise due to the melting of mountain and subpolar glaciers
Oceans change as a result of the impact of climatic variability on glaciers and ice caps that further contributes to fluctuation sin sea leve. Observational and modelling studies of glaciers and ice caps indicate an ave...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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