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Water poverty index, by country in 2002 Water poverty index, by country in 2002
Freshwater, as a natural resource, represents a fundamental key to sustainable livelihoods - for health, economy and development. The water poverty index (WPI) is an aggregate index, describing the lack of freshwater. The index is calculated based on five components: resources, access, capacity, use, and environment, using indicators describing these.
28 Sep 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Global International Waters Assessment (GIWA) case studies Global International Waters Assessment (GIWA) case studies
The Global International Waters Assessment (GIWA) is an example of a comprehensive strategic assessment designed to identify priorities for remedial and mitigatory actions in international waters. This graphic shows GIWA case studies for the Black Sea, the Amazon, the Great Barrier Reef and the Agulhas Current. Each case study includes an introduction and maps of the region and a discussion of the issues of concern for that region, such as freshw...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Global International Waters Assessment Tools Global International Waters Assessment Tools
Global International Waters Assessment's (GIWA) assessment tools for monitoring the world's water resources, incorporating five major environmental concerns and application of the DPSIR framework (driving forces-pressure-state-impact-response), are now beginning to yield results of practical use for management decisions. This graphic explains the GIWA Assessment Methodology and GIWA's five main environmental concerns, which are: freshwater shorta...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Global capture fisheries and aquaculture production, 1950-1999 Global capture fisheries and aquaculture production, 1950-1999
The global fisheries catch has levelled off, reflecting a growing decline in most major fishing areas. This graphic shows the amount of global aquaculture production and of global capture fishery catches in millions of tonnes per year for 1950 to 1999. The graphic also shows the amounts of global aquaculture production in marine water, freshwater and brackish water, in millions of tonnes, for 1998.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Water withdrawal and consumption Water withdrawal and consumption
Freshwater use is partly based on several socio-economic development factors, including population, physiography, and climatic characteristics. This graphic illustrates freshwater use, in cubic kilometres per year, from 1900 to 2000 for the world's major regions, and projects freshwater use for 2000 to 2025. It also shows how much water was withdrawn and consumed, in cubic kilometres per year, by each continent at the end of the 1990's. Finally, ...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Freshwater withdrawal in agriculture, industry and domestic use Freshwater withdrawal in agriculture, industry and domestic use
The agricultural sector is by far the biggest user of freshwater, primarily for irrigation of arable land. This graphic shows the relative percentages of water use by the agricultural, industrial and domestic sectors in the countries of the world in 2000.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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World's surface water: precipitation, evaporation and runoff World's surface water: precipitation, evaporation and runoff
The world's surface water is affected by different levels of precipitation, evaporation and runoff in different regions. This graphic illustrates the different rates at which these processes affect the major regions of the world, and the resulting uneven distribution of freshwater. It shows the amount of precipitation in cubic kilometres for each region, and the percentage of that amount which evaporates or becomes runoff. The text below the grap...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Renewable freshwater supplies, per river basin Renewable freshwater supplies, per river basin
Freshwater represents a crucial sort for human development, for nature and for ecosystem services. This graphic compares freshwater supplies in cubic metres per capita, per river basin in 1995 with a projection of freshwater supplies for the same areas in 2025. The graphic shows which areas were experiencing water stress, which were experiencing water scarcity and which had sufficient quantities of freshwater in 1995, and shows projections for th...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Fish diversity in freshwater systems Fish diversity in freshwater systems
Although freshwater ecosystems such as rivers, lakes and wetlands occupy less than 2% of the Earth's total land surface, they provide a wide range of habitats for a significant proportion of the world's plant and animal species. This graphic explains which areas of the world have high and low populations of fish species and of endemic fish.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Urban and rural water supply and sanitation Urban and rural water supply and sanitation
The graphic shows the amount of water supply versus sanitation coverage between the world and developing nations in percentage. It shows statistics from 1990 and 2000, as well as comparing rural to urban.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Freshwater availability: groundwater and river flow Freshwater availability: groundwater and river flow
This graphic shows the availability of freshwater through average river flows and groundwater recharge, in cubic metres per capita per year, at the national level in the year 2000. The graphic highlights the countries with the least freshwater resources (Egypt and the United Arab Emirates) and those with the most (Suriname and Iceland).
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Trends in marine and freshwater populations Trends in marine and freshwater populations
The Marine Species Population Index provides an assessment of the average change over time in the populations of 217 species of marine mammals, birds, reptiles, and fish. The index represents the average value of six regional ocean indices. More pronounced declines are seen in the southern oceans, which is attributed to the fact that major losses and degradation of marine ecosystems in the industrialised world took place prior to 1970. Marine sp...
17 May 2005 - by Delphine Digout, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Regional trends in freshwater alkalinity Regional trends in freshwater alkalinity
Alkalinity (as CaCO3) was analysed for all sampling stations available at the continental level. Concentrations remained reasonably steady between the two decades for Africa, Asia, South America and Australasia. Significant increases in alkalinity concentrations were noted for European and North American rivers, which may indicate a shift towards reduced acidic impacts at the continental scale.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Long-term variations in river flow, by continent Long-term variations in river flow, by continent
River runoff is cyclical in nature, with alternating cycles of wet and dry years. Significant deviations from average values differ in duration and magnitude. For example, 1940-44, 1965-68 and 1977-79 are clearly low periods in terms of total runoff from the world's rivers. During these periods, the runoff was estimated at 1 600-2 900 km3 below the average value. By contrast, 1926-27, 1949-52 and 1973-75 saw much greater levels of river runoff (S...
17 May 2005 - by Delphine Digout, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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River runoff by continent, 1921-1985 River runoff by continent, 1921-1985
River runoff represents the accumlated water, from preciptation and meltwater, that feeds into rivers that feeds into seas. The estimated annual figures in this graphic is what volume of water that ends up in the World Ocean. Factors influencing this volume is primarily the area that drains (e.g. area of continent), precipitation and evaporation. Tropical regions typically exhibit greater river runoff volumes. The Amazon carries 15% of all the wa...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Regional trends in biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) Regional trends in biochemical oxygen demand (BOD)
Biochemical oxygen demand is an indicator of the organic pollution of freshwater. Alkalinity (concentration of calcium carbonate or CaCO3) is another indicator of freshwater quality. These graphics compare the concentrations of these two factors, in milligrams per litre, in the major regions of the world for the periods 1976 to 1990 and 1991 to 2000. The accompanying text explains the implications of the changes in BOD and alkalinity during these...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Water consumption - top countries Water consumption - top countries
Freshwater use is partly based on several socio-economic development factors, including population, physiography, and climatic characteristics. This graphic illustrates the world's top 20 water consumers per capita, in cubic metres, which signify which countries are more effective in using the water.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Trends in fisheries - freshwater and marine capture fishery Trends in fisheries - freshwater and marine capture fishery
The harvest of freshwater fish is likely to increase either through capture fisheries or aquaculture (otherwise known as 'fish farming'). This graphic shows inland capture fisheries trends at the national level for 1984 to 1997, and illustrates the ratio between the 1998 catch and the maximum recorded catch in various marine fishing zones around the world.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Lake Chad - decrease in area 1963, 1973, 1987, 1997 and 2001 Lake Chad - decrease in area 1963, 1973, 1987, 1997 and 2001
Straddling the borders of Nigeria, Chad, Niger and Cameroon in West Africa, Lake Chad has been a source of freshwater for irrigation projects in all these countries. This graphic traces the shrinkage of Lake Chad and changes in vegetation from 1963 to 2001. It includes maps of the lake from 1963, 1973, 1987, 1997 and 2001. Climatic changes and high demands for agricultural water are responsible for the lake's shrinkage.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Urban water supply and wastewater on a shallow aquifer Urban water supply and wastewater on a shallow aquifer
This graphic shows the changes in water supply and wastewater disposal that occur through four stages of growth of a settlement: early settlement; the town becomes a city; the city expands and the city expands further. The changes include increased groundwater pollution and changes in pluvial drainage, the water table and wellfields.
17 May 2005 - by Delphine Digout, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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