Tag: Food

Arctic sea ice food web - schematic illustration
Sea ice represents a unique ecosystem in the Arctic, providing habitat to specialized iceassociated species that include microorganisms, fish, birds, and marine mammals. Individual species use sea ice in different ways d...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
Trends in local meat-and fish in NWT
The harvest of natural resources is a key feature of traditional lifestyles and economies throughout the Arctic, and a continuing reliance on it as a mainstay of indigenous existence in the north is evident. According t...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
Wild food harvests in Alaska by area, 1990s
The harvest of natural resources is a key feature of traditional lifestyles and economies throughout the Arctic, and a continuing reliance on it as a mainstay of indigenous existence in the north is evident. In Alaska, w...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
Distribution and current trend of polar bear subpopulations throughout the circumpolar Arctic
Polar bears occur in 19 relatively discrete subpopulations with an estimated worldwide abundance of 20,000– 25,000 animals. Our knowledge of the status and trend of each subpopulation varies due to availability, reliabil...
01 May 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Sturgeons distribution in the Black Sea
Illustration in a set of graphics prepared for a pilot assessment report on the Black Sea drainage basin, for the UNEP Global Impact on Waters Assessment (GIWA). All data and information were prepared in close collaborat...
07 Nov 2010 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Turbot distribution in the Black Sea
Illustration in a set of graphics prepared for a pilot assessment report on the Black Sea drainage basin, for the UNEP Global Impact on Waters Assessment (GIWA). All data and information were prepared in close collaborat...
07 Nov 2010 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Comb-jelly (Mnemiopsis leidyi) spreading through the Caspian Sea (invasive species)
The comb jelly (Mnemiopsis leidyi) is well adapted to the habitat (salinity, temperature, and food range) and reproduces faster than endemic species. As it eats the same food as them, it has had a drastic effect on their...
21 May 2010 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Orangutan distribution on Borneo (Indonesia, Malaysia)
The distribution of Orangutan on Borneo is rapidly decreasing, as mankind is reducing the available habitat for the apes. The loss of forest, through logging, clearing and burning, means reduced opportunities for hiding ...
21 May 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Polar bear sub-populations and pollution
There are thought to be between 20,000 and 25,000 bears in the world, which occur in19 relatively discrete sub-populations, some of which are shared between nations. Topping the food chain in the Arctic, the polar bear i...
13 Oct 2010 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Deteriorated forest hotspots
Despite showing signs of slowing at the global level, the present pace of deforestation continues to be a source of serious concern for Latin America and the Caribbean. While the region’s forests represent one of the mos...
22 Nov 2010 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Climate change impacts that could affect attainment of the Millennium Development Goals
Sustainability in the Latin American and Caribbean countries may be affected by climate change impacts. Costs associated with climate change can intensify budget constraints as countries attempt to reduce poverty and wor...
22 Nov 2010 - by Nieves López Izquierdo, Associate Consultant UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Index of biodiversity potential in Central America
Biodiversity is vitally important to human well-being as it provides ecosystem services on which humans depend. For many species that are sensitive to even small variations in climate, their primary threat is climate cha...
22 Nov 2010 - by Nieves López Izquierdo, Associate Consultant UNEP/GRID-Arendal
PCBs in the blood of Arctic residents
Many POPs (persistent organic pollutants) and heavy metals from emissions further south are accumulated in Arctic food chains and ultimately in indigenous peoples. While fear of these compounds sometimes has resulted in ...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Coastal Arctic food web (drift ice)
The coastal Arctic food web is closely related to drift ice conditions and seasonal use of shorelines by both terrestrial and sea mammals. Numerous species depend upon each other and the transport of food to and from the...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Mercury levels in indigenous women
Many POPs (persistent organic pollutants) and heavy metals from emissions further south are accumulated in Arctic food chains and ultimately in indigenous peoples. While fear of these compounds sometimes has resulted in ...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Pathways of contaminants to the Arctic
Many POPs (persistent organic pollutants), heavy metals and other contaminants from emissions further south are accumulated in Arctic food chains and ultimately in indigenous peoples. This process is often referred to as...
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Orangutan distribution on Borneo (Indonesia, Malaysia)
The distribution of Orangutan on Borneo is rapidly decreasing, as mankind is reducing the available habitat for the apes. The loss of forest, through logging, clearing and burning, means reduced opportunities for hiding ...
22 Jan 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Fishing yield
Three-quarters of the world’s fish stocks are currently exploited to the maximum extent, if not in excess (FAO, 2000). This exploitation has had the following impacts: - A growing variety of fishery products are being e...
26 Jan 2009 - by Phillippe Rekacewicz, February 2006
Freshwater use by sector at the beginning of the 2000s
The agricultural sector is by far the biggest user of freshwater. Analysis indicates that: - In the United States, agriculture accounts for some 49% of total freshwater use, with 80% of this volume being used for irriga...
26 Jan 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz (Le Monde diplomatique)
The disappearance of the Aral Sea
The demise of the Aral Sea in central Asia was caused primarily by the diversion of the inflowing Amu Dar’ya and Syr Dar’ya rivers to provide irrigation water for local croplands. These diversions dramatically reduced th...
26 Jan 2009 - by GRIDA
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