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Major environmental crimes Major environmental crimes
The economic scale of environmental crime is substantial - especially on illegal logging and fisheries - and probably just as large as or well exceed global ODA (Official Development Assistance) of around USD 135 billion.
19 Jun 2014 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID Arendal
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Environmental crime network Environmental crime network
The opportunities ecosystems provide for future development are threatened by serious and increasingly sophisticated transnational organized environmental crime. This includes illegal logging, poaching and trafficking of a wide range of animals, illegal fisheries, illegal mining and dumping of toxic waste. It is a rapidly rising threat to the environment, to revenues from natural resources, to state security and to sustainable development. Combin...
19 Jun 2014 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID Arendal
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Sturgeon catch in the Caspian Sea and caviar imports Sturgeon catch in the Caspian Sea and caviar imports
The sturgeon – sought for its caviar – has declined dramatically in what is now a heavily illegal trade. To reduce the illicit trade in any wildlife, responses must include front line protection, customs control, investigation and prosecution of networks and targeted consumer awareness programmes as well as general awareness to the local populations on the threats posed to their local economy, food security and sustainability.
19 Jun 2014 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID Arendal
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Fish catch in the Mediterranean Sea sub-regions Fish catch in the Mediterranean Sea sub-regions
Fishing is an important issue for the Mediterranean. Although it puts only a relatively small quantity of produce on the market compared with the demand, it is a significant source of employment and an important component of the Mediterranean cultural identity. It accounts for 420.000 jobs, 280.000 of which are fishermen, and the average prices of landed produce are much higher than world prices.
19 Nov 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Total sturgeon catch in the Caspian Total sturgeon catch in the Caspian
Six sturgeon species are found in the Caspian Sea and its drainage basin: Russian sturgeon (Acipenser gueldenstaedtii), Persian sturgeon (A. persicus), Stellate sturgeon (A. stellatus), Ship sturgeon (A. nudiventris), Sterlet (Acipenser ruthenus) and Beluga (Huso huso). The bulk of the world’s remaining stock of wild sturgeon resources is found in the Caspian, which also accounted in the past for between 80 and 90 per cent of total world caviar ...
17 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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The importance of fish for selected SIDS The importance of fish for selected SIDS
Globally, 180 million people are engaged in fisheries and aquaculture activities, which sustain over 0.5 billion people, while small scale fisheries employ close to 110 million people (FAO 2010). Many small-scale operators are self-employed and engaged in both subsistence and commercial activities (FAO 2011). Aggregate capture fisheries play a major role in many national economies, especially in the Pacific SIDS, where capture fisheries can con...
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Small-scale fishery, large employment Small-scale fishery, large employment
Many small-scale operators are self-employed and engaged in both subsistence and commercial activities (FAO 2011). Aggregate capture fisheries play a major role in many national economies.
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Fisheries under threat in the Black Sea Fisheries under threat in the Black Sea
Illustration in a set of graphics prepared for a pilot assessment report on the Black Sea drainage basin, for the UNEP Global Impact on Waters Assessment (GIWA). All data and information were prepared in close collaboration with the GIWA Black Sea team and the GIWA secretariat. The graphics were not used in this form in the final report on the Black Sea, published in 2005.
07 Nov 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Total fish catch in the Black Sea over the last 30 years Total fish catch in the Black Sea over the last 30 years
Illustration in a set of graphics prepared for a pilot assessment report on the Black Sea drainage basin, for the UNEP Global Impact on Waters Assessment (GIWA). All data and information were prepared in close collaboration with the GIWA Black Sea team and the GIWA secretariat. The graphics were never not used in this form in the final report on the Black Sea, published in 2005.
07 Nov 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Primary threats to the marine environment Primary threats to the marine environment
Each of the big five stressors (not in order of magnitude), 1) Climate change; 2) Pollution (mainly coastal), 3) Fragmentation and habitat loss (from e.g. dredging/trawling, use of explosives in fishing on coral reefs etc.), 4) Invasive species infestations, and 5) Over-harvest from fisheries may individually or combined result in severe impacts on the biological production of the worlds oceans and the services they provide to billions of people ...
01 Nov 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Global capture fisheries and aquaculture production, 1950-1999 Global capture fisheries and aquaculture production, 1950-1999
The global fisheries catch has levelled off, reflecting a growing decline in most major fishing areas. This graphic shows the amount of global aquaculture production and of global capture fishery catches in millions of tonnes per year for 1950 to 1999. The graphic also shows the amounts of global aquaculture production in marine water, freshwater and brackish water, in millions of tonnes, for 1998.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Trends in marine and freshwater populations Trends in marine and freshwater populations
The Marine Species Population Index provides an assessment of the average change over time in the populations of 217 species of marine mammals, birds, reptiles, and fish. The index represents the average value of six regional ocean indices. More pronounced declines are seen in the southern oceans, which is attributed to the fact that major losses and degradation of marine ecosystems in the industrialised world took place prior to 1970. Marine sp...
17 May 2005 - by Delphine Digout, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Trends in fisheries - freshwater and marine capture fishery Trends in fisheries - freshwater and marine capture fishery
The harvest of freshwater fish is likely to increase either through capture fisheries or aquaculture (otherwise known as 'fish farming'). This graphic shows inland capture fisheries trends at the national level for 1984 to 1997, and illustrates the ratio between the 1998 catch and the maximum recorded catch in various marine fishing zones around the world.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Fish catch and production Fish catch and production
Fishing activities have various negative impacts on marine ecosystems. The greatest cause for concern is the rapid depletion of fish population due to extensive commercial fishing. In 2002 72% of the world’s marine fish stocks were being harvested faster than they can reproduce. Bycatch – the harvest of fish or shellfish other than the species for which the fishing gear was set – accounts for a quarter of the total catch (27m tonnes in 2003) an...
01 Feb 2006 - by Stéphane Kluser
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Marine, coastal, and island systems Marine, coastal, and island systems
Marine systems are the world’s oceans. For mapping purposes, the map shows ocean areas where the depth is greater than 50 meters. Global fishery catches from marine systems peaked in the late 1980s and are now declining despite increasing fishing effort.
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Current marine shipping uses in the Arctic Current marine shipping uses in the Arctic
Biological invasions are known from around the globe but are relatively less known or studied in the Arctic. This secondary migration of invasives complicates ecological interactions as naturally occurring species from areas adjacent to the Arctic are also expanding their ranges northward. Another study found that the rate of marine invasion is increasing; that most reported invasions are by crustaceans and molluscs; and, importantly, that most i...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
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Distribution and spawning areas of four fish species Distribution and spawning areas of four fish species
Distribution and spawning areas of arctic cod, polar cod, herring and capelin in the Barents Sea region. The Barents region is in the Arctic and covers the area of Western Russia and the northern areas of Finland, Sweden and Norway.
21 May 2010 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Arctic char species complex, distribution map Arctic char species complex, distribution map
The Arctic char species complex, sensu stricto, represent a key component of the marine and freshwater ecosystems of the north. Chars are stressed by factors such as fisheries, climate change and pollutants. We are possibly altering char biodiversity without documenting it and understanding its relevance. Concerted pan-Arctic biodiversity assessments, sustained research, and coordinated monitoring of chars are required to outline the scope of div...
01 Nov 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Distribution and spawning areas of four fish species Distribution and spawning areas of four fish species
Distribution and spawning areas of arctic cod, polar cod, herring and capelin in the Barents Sea region. The Barents region is in the Arctic and covers the area of Western Russia and the northern areas of Finland, Sweden and Norway.
04 Oct 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Fishing yield Fishing yield
Three-quarters of the world’s fish stocks are currently exploited to the maximum extent, if not in excess (FAO, 2000). This exploitation has had the following impacts: - A growing variety of fishery products are being exploited. Commercial fishermen are targeting progressively smaller species at lower levels of the food chain because the main predator species are being depleted. - Most of the world’s main fishing areas are close to full exploit...
26 Jan 2009 - by Phillippe Rekacewicz, February 2006
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