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Environment in Central Asia [Russian] Environment in Central Asia [Russian]
There are 25 billion tonnes of waste just from mining and metal production in Central Asia. The most effected areas are highlighted based on a variety of different types of environmental damage such as desertification and wind erosion. In Russian.
14 Feb 2006 - by I. Atamuradova, V. Yemelin, P. Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Aral Sea: Chances of Survival [Russian] Aral Sea: Chances of Survival [Russian]
The Aral Sea is shrinking at an alarming rate and the amount of consumption of water in the Aral Sea Basin has greatly affected current conditions. This shows predicted models of water problems in the Aral Sea. In Russian.
14 Feb 2006 - by I. Atamuradova, V. Yemelin, P. Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Water resources and demand in the Aral Sea region [Russian] Water resources and demand in the Aral Sea region [Russian]
The regulation and access to a shared and limited water resource ca be highly influenced by the political geography. The Aral Sea is shrinking at an alarming rate and the amount of consumption of water in the Aral Sea Basin has greatly affected current conditions.
14 Feb 2006 - by I. Atamuradova, V. Yemelin, P. Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Development in Central Asia Development in Central Asia
The predictive models for population growth and Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of the Aral Sea region shows there maybe some stabilization between the two and possibly some positive implications for the region.
14 Feb 2006 - by I. Atamuradova, V. Yemelin, P. Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Cultivated Land in Aral Sea Region [Russian] Cultivated Land in Aral Sea Region [Russian]
Between 1990 and 2000 the area of cultivated land per capita in the Aral Sea region has dramatically reduced. The predictive models to the year 2020 show the increase demand in irrigation of the region. In Russian.
14 Feb 2006 - by I. Atamuradova, V. Yemelin, P. Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Cultivated Land in Aral Sea Region Cultivated Land in Aral Sea Region
Between 1990 and 2000 the area of cultivated land per capita in the Aral Sea region has dramatically reduced. The predictive models to the year 2020 show the increase demand in irrigation of the region.
14 Feb 2006 - by I. Atamuradova, V. Yemelin, P. Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Energy consumption in Central Asia [Russian] Energy consumption in Central Asia [Russian]
Industry in Central Asia consumes two hundred to three hundred more energy than in Western Europe. The levels of productivity based on consumption of electricity and gross domestic product is noticeably lower in Central Asia with Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan being the worst at energy consumption. In Russian.
14 Feb 2006 - by I. Atamuradova, V. Yemelin, P. Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Aral Sea: Chances of Survival Aral Sea: Chances of Survival
The Aral Sea is shrinking at an alarming rate and the amount of consumption of water in the Aral Sea Basin has greatly affected current conditions. This shows predicted models of water problems in the Aral Sea.
14 Feb 2006 - by I. Atamuradova, V. Yemelin, P. Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Biodiveristy in Central Asia [Russian] Biodiveristy in Central Asia [Russian]
Caspian and Balkhash endemic species are under threat of extinction. It is estimated that ten percent of total area needs to be protected in order to sustain development and the countries of the region are seriously behind that benchmark. In Russian.
14 Feb 2006 - by I. Atamuradova, V. Yemelin, P. Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Environment in Central Asia Environment in Central Asia
There are 25 billion tonnes of waste just from mining and metal production in Central Asia. The most effected areas are highlighted based on a variety of different types of environmental damage such as desertification and wind erosion.
14 Feb 2006 - by I. Atamuradova, V. Yemelin, P. Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Energy consumption in Central Asia Energy consumption in Central Asia
Industry in Central Asia consumes two hundred to three hundred more energy than in Western Europe. The levels of productivity based on consumption of electricity and gross domestic product is noticeably lower in Central Asia with Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan being the worst at energy consumption.
14 Feb 2006 - by I. Atamuradova, V. Yemelin, P. Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Health in Central Asia Health in Central Asia
Central Asia has a very high infant mortality rate and many other major health problems. This graphic shows some of the main causes of death as well as infant mortality and life expectancy rates for the region.
14 Feb 2006 - by I. Atamuradova, V. Yemelin, P. Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Central Asia: political transition and environmental risks Central Asia: political transition and environmental risks
The Environment and Security consultations in Ashgabat in 2003 pinpointed the Ferghana valley as an area of significant concern in Central Asia (UNEP, UNDP, OSCE 2003) The graphic shows the priority geographic areas and thematic issues for possible ENVSEC action in this area
16 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Environment and Security priority areas in the Ferghana Valley Environment and Security priority areas in the Ferghana Valley
The graphic shows an outline of the areas within the Ferghana Valley which are subjects to disputes over water resources and borders, disputes between private and collective farmers, deforestation and overuse of pasture. The map also show areas of industrial pollution and chemical risks caused by badly maintained radioactive dumps, tailing containments and several working industrial facilities.
16 Mar 2006 - by Viktor Novikov and Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Radioactive, chemical and biological hazards in Central Asia Radioactive, chemical and biological hazards in Central Asia
The Soviet development model for Central Asia was based on building large-scale irrigation schemes enabling the region to become a major cotton producer and expanding the mining and processing industry. Industrial operations in the region paid little attention to the environment and public health, resulting in the accumulation of pollutants in the local environment. Today, not only active industrial facilities constitute a threat to environment, ...
16 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Metal production in the South Kyrgyz mines of the Ferghana Valley Metal production in the South Kyrgyz mines of the Ferghana Valley
In the soviet period the industrial operations paid little attention to environment or public health, resulting in the accumulation of pollutants in the local environment. Because of their vulnerability to natural hazards, previous history of accidents, and their position along water courses and in the vicinity of towns and cities in transboundary areas, tailing dumps at both active and closed mining enterprises constitute an environmental as wel...
16 Mar 2006 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Environment and Security Initiative : Today`s priorities and future challenges Environment and Security Initiative : Today`s priorities and future challenges
The pilot phase of the initiative in 2003 assessed environmental threats in Central Asia and South –Eastern Europe, two regions where environmental concerns have clear security implications. The Southern Caucasus joined in 2004. Eastern Europe and the Circumpolar Arctic will be included in 2005-2006. In each region work stats by identifying, through consultation with national and regional stakeholders, priority environment and security issues and...
16 Mar 2006 - by Viktor Novikov and Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Trends in regional average surface temperature in the Ferghana Valley area Trends in regional average surface temperature in the Ferghana Valley area
An important factor when looking at the region in terms of environment and security is the impact of climate change in Central Asia in general, and Ferghana Valley in particular. By modifying people’s livelihood, climate change may have an important security dimension in conjunction with other aggravating factors. In the Ferghana valley it is likely that climate change will primarily affect sector related to water and agriculture. Central Asia is...
16 Mar 2006 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Uganda: quantifying the importance of environment and natural resources Uganda: quantifying the importance of environment and natural resources
Estimations calculate that the environment and natural resources sector should contribute USD 791 million to the Uganda GDP, excluding benefits like ecosystem services. In the formal figures, only USD 405 million is recorded, where subsistence use and informal markets are not captured. Over 90% of the employment in the sector is secondary processing and subsistence use. Sustainable natural resource use implies that this sector will continue to pr...
02 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Employment in the travel and tourism industry in Africa Employment in the travel and tourism industry in Africa
About 6.3 million people work in the travel and tourism industry in Africa, where tourism is highly dependent on natural and cultural environment. However, since travel & tourism touches all sectors of the economy, its real impact is even greater.
02 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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