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Major mineral fuel resources in Europe, Caucasus and Central Asia Major mineral fuel resources in Europe, Caucasus and Central Asia
Mineral fuels for electricity and heat generation take primarily two forms: fossil fuels in the form of oil, natural gas and coal, and uranimum ore for nuclear power. Oil and gas are distributed in different belts, primarily in the North Sea, Caucasus and Northern Russia. Coal in different forms is still an important fuel resource and resources are distributed over the region. Uranium resources are primarily in Ukraine and Central Asia.
20 Jul 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Hydropower potential (theoretical possitibility for electricity generation) Hydropower potential (theoretical possitibility for electricity generation)
xHydropower, generating electricity through turbines, represents a clean and renewable energy source, but not without problems. Dams and reservoirs disrupt the natural flow, and may increase siltation and evaporation, in addition to severe impacts for wildlife, for instance migrating fish. The gross theoretical capability, presented in this map, represents a calculation based on the topography and precipitation in the countries, and is the amount...
20 Jul 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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BSR efficiency in central transformation and transmission BSR efficiency in central transformation and transmission
Graphics from the year 2000 Baltic 21 biannual indicator-based status report on sustainable development in the Baltic Sea Region (Baltic 21 Series No 1/2000 ) BSR efficiency in central transformation and transmission has remained constant from 1990 to 1997.
10 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Gross consumption of electricity in 1996 and prognoses until 2005 Gross consumption of electricity in 1996 and prognoses until 2005
The graphic shows gross consumption of electricity in 1996 and prognoses until 2005. The projections to 2005 shows an increase from both 1996 and 2000 in the consumption of electricity in all the nordic countries.
13 Feb 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Electricity consumption by category in the Nordic countries in 1996 Electricity consumption by category in the Nordic countries in 1996
The graphic shows electricity consumption by category in the Nordic countries in 1996. Developed countries, and Nordic nations in particular, have the highes energy consumption per capita in the world. Over the last decade developed countries have attempted to reduce the over-all energy demand.This includes attempts to increase energy efficiency in households and industrial processes.
13 Feb 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Electricity generation by sources in the Nordic countries in 1996 Electricity generation by sources in the Nordic countries in 1996
The graph shows the electricity generation by sources in the Nordic countries in 1996. Nordic countries have a highly developed energy marked, particularly in renewables, partly due to a high number of scientist working in reasearch per head of population and large budgets for development and research.
13 Feb 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Exchanges of electricity in the Nordic countries in 1996 Exchanges of electricity in the Nordic countries in 1996
The graphic shows exchanges of electricity in the Nordic countries in 1996. The Nordic countries have a long tradition of cross-border cooperation in providing an efficient and reliable power supply. The main reason for these exchanges has been that each of these countries has a different mix of power generation facilities. In the later years, from around 1997, the coopreation has changed from being an oligopoly structure with dominant state-owne...
13 Feb 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Exchange of electricity in the Nordic countries, 1996 Exchange of electricity in the Nordic countries, 1996
The graph shows exchanges of electricity in the Nordic countries in TWh. The Nordic countries have a long tradition of cross-border cooperation in providing an efficient and reliable power supply. The main reason for these exchanges has been that each of these countries has a different mix of power generation facilities. In the later years, from around 1997, the cooperation has changed from being an oligopoly structure with dominant state-owned e...
13 Feb 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Electricity consumption in Baltic region countries in 1995. in TWh Electricity consumption in Baltic region countries in 1995. in TWh
The graphic shows electricity consumption in Baltic region countries in 1995 in TWh. Russia and Germany are the biggest consumers of electricity overall, however it is worth noticing that Nordic nations by far have the highes energy consumption per capita.
13 Feb 2006 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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CO2 emissions in 1990 and 2000 Latin America and selected countries CO2 emissions in 1990 and 2000 Latin America and selected countries
A comparison of the total level of CO2 emissions from Latin America compared to selected countries. Emissions from Latin America and Caribbean increased more than the world average between 1990 and 2000. The increase inthis region was more than 35% while the total increase in the world's emission (excluding land use change) was almost 13%. In South America the increase came mainly from industry and transport, where emissions increased by more t...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Sources of electricity in Latin America and the Caribbean Sources of electricity in Latin America and the Caribbean
Shows the amount of power that is used in the three main regions from fossil fuels, hydropower and other sources. While Central America and the Caribbean have a very carbon intense electricity production, even more intense than North America and Europe, South America has the lowest carbon intense electricity production . Between 1990 and 1999, emissions from electricity and heat production in fthe Caribbean and Central America increased by more...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Regional differences in CO2 emissions Latin America and the Caribbean Regional differences in CO2 emissions Latin America and the Caribbean
Compares the total amounts of CO2 emissions from the three main regions within Latin America and the Caribbean. CO2 emissions in the region vary considerably. The highest emissions come from South America, while the lowest and relatively more stable emissions come from the Caribbean. Between 1990 and 2000, CO2 emissions from South America increased by more than 40%, mainly because of increased emissions from transportation, industry and electri...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Top 10 CO2 emitting countries in 2000; Latin America and the Caribbean Top 10 CO2 emitting countries in 2000; Latin America and the Caribbean
Brazil is the world’s second largest emitter of carbon dioxide (CO2) from land use change. Only Indonesia emits more. In 2000 CO2 emissions from land use change in Brazil represented 18% of the world’s total emissions. The per capita emissions from land use change in Brazil are 6 times higher than the world average. Most of the land use change emissions in Brazil are caused by the massive logging of its rainforest. The per capita emissions of C...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Industrial sites in Kosovo Industrial sites in Kosovo
In Kosovo mining itself promises to create 35 000 jobs. A large part of this plan is associated with the exploitation of lignite (a type of coal), which is supposed to be used exclusively for electricity generation. On the basis of existing demand for electricity in Kosovo, the known deposits would produce sufficient energy for about 1 000 years.
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Stephane Kluser, Matthias Beilstein, Ieva Rucevska, Cecile Marin, Otto Simonett
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Energy consumption in the countries of the Balkans, 1990-2004 Energy consumption in the countries of the Balkans, 1990-2004
The region's political and economic instability has discouraged any substantial investment in the energy sector. Except for some places such as Kosovo, the Balkans have no fossil fuel deposits, which are significant power source on a global scale. The Balkan countries are neither big energy producers nor consumers, so the region can rely on renewable energy to cater for tomorrow’s growing electricity demand.
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Stephane Kluser, Matthias Beilstein, Ieva Rucevska, Cecile Marin, Otto Simonett
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Share of renewable sources, out of energy consumption in the Balkans, 2005 Share of renewable sources, out of energy consumption in the Balkans, 2005
Further development of hydroelectric power will depend on several factors, perhaps the most important being market deregulation. Specific measures are needed to encourage hydroelectric power. One specific measure would be to support new investment in production facilities, this being the best way of meeting environmental challenges and improving the stability of supply.
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Stephane Kluser, Matthias Beilstein, Ieva Rucevska, Cecile Marin, Otto Simonett
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Existing and estimated hydropower capacity in the Balkans, 2006 Existing and estimated hydropower capacity in the Balkans, 2006
Hydroelectric power covers a significant share of electricity consumption in the region (43 percent in 2004). Hydroelectric power dropped noticeably due to lower rainfall in 2002 and 2003, but the increase in overall electricity consumption nevertheless seems likely to continue driving demand upwards.
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Stephane Kluser, Matthias Beilstein, Ieva Rucevska, Cecile Marin, Otto Simonett
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Introducing the main renewable energies Introducing the main renewable energies
Applications: Electricity production, Industrial process, Heating or cooling buildings, Warmer water and Transport.
04 Jun 2008 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Nuclear waste generation Nuclear waste generation
More than three-quarters of nuclear reactors currently in service are more than 20 years old. After an average service life of 30 years it takes 20 more years to dismantle them. The spent fuel figures for 2002 are national projections. Quantities fluctuated strongly in the United Kingdom, partly due to variations in electricity output from nuclear power. Decommissioning of several older power stations explains the peaks.
15 Dec 2006 - by Emmanuelle Bournay
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Energy consumption in Central Asia [Russian] Energy consumption in Central Asia [Russian]
Industry in Central Asia consumes two hundred to three hundred more energy than in Western Europe. The levels of productivity based on consumption of electricity and gross domestic product is noticeably lower in Central Asia with Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan being the worst at energy consumption. In Russian.
14 Feb 2006 - by I. Atamuradova, V. Yemelin, P. Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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