HomeAboutActivitiesMapsPhotosPublicationsNews
 
Home >> Eastern Europe

Tag: Eastern Europe

Items not regulated Items not regulated
The Technical Regulation of the Customs Union establishes common principles and rules for Belarus, Kazakhstan and the Russian Federation. The category ‘On the safety of toys’ contains a list of items not regarded as toys and therefore not regulated. This list is comprised of sports equipment including that used for underwater activities, firearm replicas, imitation jewellery for children, swimming equipment (e.g. inflatable arm floats) and prote...
25 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
5
Concentrations of heavy metals in children's toys Concentrations of heavy metals in children's toys
The study found that of the 569 products tested, 104 (18 per cent) exceeded the limit for lead, 18 (3 per cent) exceeded the limit for mercury, 45 (8 per cent) exceeded the limit for arsenic and 75 products (13 per cent) exceeded the limit for antimony. Seventy-five (13 per cent) of these products contained two or more toxic metals, thereby increasing the likelihood of harmful impacts.
25 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
4
Impact of toxic metals Impact of toxic metals
The toxic substances found in toys in the study can cause a variety of harmful consequences. Lead is a neurotoxin with no safe level of exposure. Even small amounts in children can give rise to learning difficulties, attention deficit disorder, trouble with coordination, anemia, as well as visual, spatial and speech problems. Mercury damages the kidneys and can inflict damage on the nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, hematolo...
25 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
5
Movement of the toys Movement of the toys
Of the 164 products containing a toxic metal, six originated in the EU, contrary to labeling data. The presence of such substances raises questions over the integrity of EU standards and regulations for children’s products. A large proportion of products containing toxic metals also contained the Russian conformity mark which supposedly confirms compliance with existing national safety requirements. This raises concerns among safety advocates i...
25 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
4
Percentage of analysed toys that exceeded the Russian regulatory limit for toxic metal content in soil Percentage of analysed toys that exceeded the Russian regulatory limit for toxic metal content in soil
The study found that of the 569 products tested, 104 (18 per cent) exceeded the limit for lead, 18 (3 per cent) exceeded the limit for mercury, 45 (8 per cent) exceeded the limit for arsenic and 75 products (13 per cent) exceeded the limit for antimony. Seventy-five (13 per cent) of these products contained two or more toxic metals, thereby increasing the likelihood of harmful impacts.
25 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
3
Metal contamination in analysed toys Metal contamination in analysed toys
The study found that of the 569 products tested, 104 (18 per cent) exceeded the limit for lead, 18 (3 per cent) exceeded the limit for mercury, 45 (8 per cent) exceeded the limit for arsenic and 75 products (13 per cent) exceeded the limit for antimony. Seventy-five (13 per cent) of these products contained two or more toxic metals, thereby increasing the likelihood of harmful impacts.
25 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
4
Origin of the toys Origin of the toys
Of the 164 products containing a toxic metal, six originated in the EU, contrary to labeling data. The presence of such substances raises questions over the integrity of EU standards and regulations for children’s products. A large proportion of products containing toxic metals also contained the Russian conformity mark which supposedly confirms compliance with existing national safety requirements. This raises concerns among safety advocates in...
25 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
3
World Toys Market and Population and GDP in 2010 World Toys Market and Population and GDP in 2010
Toys are a big business. Between 2007 and 2010 the global toys market grew by nearly 5 per cent in value terms – from US$78.1 billion to US$83.3 billion. The majority of the toys on the market – many millions of them – are manufactured in China, often under licenses from large Western and Japanese conglomerates. In this study, we also found toys made in Armenia, Belarus, Russia, Ukraine and the European Union (EU).
25 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
3
Ethnic groups in the South Eastern Europe Ethnic groups in the South Eastern Europe
Since the fall of the Iron Curtain, ethnic tension has been a major factor in the development of the political situation in the Balkan Region. The break up of communist Yugoslavia lead to wide spread confict in the 1990-ies and has lead to the formation of new countries.
11 Feb 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
South Eastern Europe to Central Asia: political transition and environmental risks South Eastern Europe to Central Asia: political transition and environmental risks
The graphic maps out the areas that are at risk, or already contaminated from nuclear industry after the break-up of the former Soviet Union. Nuclear power has unresolved problems of waste disposal. Waste remains dangerous for thousands of human generations and can be converted to plutonium, a component of nuclear weapons. The mining of nuclear fuel, containing U-235 and U-238, can pollute groundwater with both heavy metals and traces of radioact...
11 Feb 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
5
Russian Federation Administration (Oblasts) 1997 Russian Federation Administration (Oblasts) 1997
The map shows the administrative regions (oblasts), territories, national districts and republics of Russia. Russia has a total population of well over 143 million people. It has wide natural resources, including major deposits of oil, natural gas, coal, strategic minerals, and timber.It also faces formidable obstacles of climate, terrain, and distance hinder exploitation of natural resources. Major envionmental issues are air pollution from heav...
14 Sep 2006 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
5
Human development - socio-economic indicators in central and east Europe, 2004 Human development - socio-economic indicators in central and east Europe, 2004
Central and Eastern Europe is varied in the levels of development indicators such as, Gross Domestic Product (GDP), Human Development Index (HDI), life expectancy and education. Some of the Balkan states do not have the appropriate information gathered to be included but the ones that do show the area is lagging behind.
06 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Stephane Kluser, Matthias Beilstein, Ieva Rucevska, Cecile Marin, Otto Simonett
2
Population groups in the Balkan region and Eastern Europe Population groups in the Balkan region and Eastern Europe
The wars in former Yugoslavia sped up the process of ethnic homogenization in the west Balkans since modern states started to take form in the 19th century. In Croatia, for instance, the proportion of Serbs in the overall population has dropped from 12 per cent to just 4 per cent in 10 years.
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Le Monde Diplomatique and UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
World coal consumption World coal consumption
The graphic shows the world coal consumption from various regions in comparison to the world totals. It shows trends from 1990 to 1999 and predicts the patterns to 2020. The predictions to 2020 show a decrease in coal consumption in eastern Europe and the former Soviet Ùion. However, it shows a considerable increase in the North America and developing countries, causing the total global consumption to increase.
28 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
CO2 emissions from coal, gas and oil for selected regions CO2 emissions from coal, gas and oil for selected regions
Graph showing the amount (in millions of metric tonnes) of CO2 emissions from coal, gas and oil. Covers the years from 1990-2000 and predicts the trend to 2020. Information on the United States, Western Europe, Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union and Africa is included.
28 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
5
World consumption and prognoses of primary energy World consumption and prognoses of primary energy
Consumption of non-renewable resources ahve been increasing in most of the world except Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union. This graphic shows the world oil, natural gas and coal consumption from various regions in comparison to the world totals. Shows trends from 1990 and predicts the patterns to 2020.
28 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Russian Federation, topographic map Russian Federation, topographic map
Russian Federation is located in Northern Asia (that part west of the Urals is included with Europe), bordering the Arctic Ocean, between Europe and the North Pacific Ocean, comprising of 17,075,200 sq km. It has a population of 143,420,309 (2005). Major environmental concerns are: air pollution from heavy industry, emissions of coal-fired electric plants, and transportation in major cities; industrial, municipal, and agricultural pollution of in...
14 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
South Ossetia - environmental headlines (topographic and political map) South Ossetia - environmental headlines (topographic and political map)
South Ossetia - environmental headlines (topographic and political map. The basemap is complemented with textual information on 'environmental headlines'which are the preliminary results of a desk assessment conducted by GRID-Arendal under the ENVSEC initiative (UNEP; OSCE; NATO; UNDP; UNECE; REC)
31 Oct 2005 - by Matthias Beilstein and Otto Simonett
3
Albania, topographic map with railroad routes Albania, topographic map with railroad routes
Albania is located in Southeastern Europe, bordering the Adriatic Sea and Ionian Sea, between Greece and Serbia and Montenegro comprising of 28,748 sq km. It has an estimated population of 3,563,112 (2005). Major environmental concerns are deforestation; soil erosion; water pollution from industrial and domestic effluents.
06 Nov 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
5
Albania, topographic map Albania, topographic map
Albania is located in Southeastern Europe, bordering the Adriatic Sea and Ionian Sea, between Greece and Serbia and Montenegro comprising of 28,748 sq km. It has an estimated population of 3,563,112 (2005). Major environmental concerns are deforestation; soil erosion; water pollution from industrial and domestic effluents.
06 Nov 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
      1 2 3 | Next