HomeAboutActivitiesMapsPhotosPublicationsNews
 
Home >> Deforestation

Tag: Deforestation

Wood and wood products from tropical countries to Europe and the United States Wood and wood products from tropical countries to Europe and the United States
EU imports 133–385 million cubic meters RWE of wood products. The US imports about 72 million. About 59 per cent of the imports to the EU and the US are paper and pulp. The wood used to produce paper and pulp is often mostly or partly declared falsely as plantation wood.
19 Jun 2014 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID Arendal
3
Illegal Logging and log laundering Illegal Logging and log laundering
Mixing of legal with illegal wood, including in pulp, chips and paper is the far most common way to hide the imports of illegally procured timber.
19 Jun 2014 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID Arendal
3
Illegal logging methods Illegal logging methods
The illegal trade in flora, such as illegal logging, has been estimate to represent a value of 30-100 billion USD annually. An estimated 50-90% of the wood in some tropical countries is suspected to come from illegal sources. Many of these illegal operations involve bribes to forest officials (in some instances noted as USD 20-50,000).
19 Jun 2014 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID Arendal
3
Illegal logging and the Congo conflict Illegal logging and the Congo conflict
Illegal logging directly fuels many conflicts, as timber is a resource available for conflict profiteers or to finance arms sales. Without public order, militants, guerrillas or military units impose taxes on logging companies or charcoal producers, issue false export permits and control border points. They frequently demand the removal of all vehicle checkpoints and public patrolling of resource-rich areas as part of the peace conditions followi...
19 Jun 2014 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID Arendal
3
Forests and conflicts Forests and conflicts
Around the world, conflicts and wars are taking a toll on forests and on the communities that rely on them for their livelihood. Dense forests can serve as hideouts for insurgent groups or can be a vital source of revenue for warring parties to sustain conflict.
19 Jun 2014 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID Arendal
3
The illegal charcoal trade controlled by Al Shabaab The illegal charcoal trade controlled by Al Shabaab
Al Shabaab’s main income appears to be from charcoal, and taxing of other commodities, as well as possibly ex-pat finance. At a single roadblock they have been able to make up to USD 8–18 million per year for taxing passing charcoal traffic in Badhaadhe District, Lower Juba Region. Al Shabaab retains about one third of the income, which alone constitutes about USD 38–56 million. The overall size of the illicit charcoal export from Somalia has b...
19 Jun 2014 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID Arendal
4
Brazilian Amazone: Law enforcement operations cause 76% reduction in deforestation Brazilian Amazone: Law enforcement operations cause 76% reduction in deforestation
Brazil managed to reduce deforestation in the country primarily through a targeted and strict enforcement effort using satellite images to detect recent logging, followed by direct action by SWAT teams and investigators also of companies and networks, dropping deforestation by 64-78%.
19 Jun 2014 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID Arendal
3
Change in proportion of land area covered by forests in Zimbabwe Change in proportion of land area covered by forests in Zimbabwe
An initial impact of land reform was deforestation as forests were cleared to accommodate larger numbers of farmers, but the impact is yet to be quantified. Figure 4.52 shows that the proportion of land area covered by forests dropped by eight per cent per decade in the period from 1990 to 2010, according to FAO estimates.
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
2
Wood production in Zimbabwe Wood production in Zimbabwe
Between 2000 and 2005, Zimbabwe had the sixth highest rate of deforestation in Africa, averaging 3 130 sq km per year (FAO 2005), with increasing uncontrolled bush and forest fires. Agriculture is responsible for an estimated 700 sq km (roughly one quarter) of this annual loss, while heavy dependence on wood for fuel and commercial logging account for the rest.
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
3
Change in proportion of land area covered by forests in Zambia Change in proportion of land area covered by forests in Zambia
The proportion of land area covered by forests has dropped more than six per cent since 1990, leaving two-thirds of the land under forests as shown in this figure.
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
3
Fuelwood production in Zambia Fuelwood production in Zambia
The consumption of fuelwood is expected to increase by 35 per cent between 2000 and 2020 (FAO 2003) and had already reached a level of 8.8 million cu m per year by 2009 (Figure 4.44). Much of the fuelwood is converted to charcoal for use in urban households or rural industries. Eighty per cent of the population continues to use solid fuels, although this is down from 86 per cent in 1990 (Government of Zambia 2008). Alternative methods need to ...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
3
Deforestation in Zambezi Basin Countries Deforestation in Zambezi Basin Countries
There is a growing body of evidence that the rate and extent of deforestation contribute to climate change in the Basin (SARDC and HBS 2010). The major causes of deforestation in the Basin are agricultural expansion, fuelwood collection, harvesting of non-timber forest products, commercial harvesting of natural/ indigenous timber species and forest fires. These are some of the issues that must be addressed in order to stem the destruction of for...
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
3
Wood exports from Congo Basin Wood exports from Congo Basin
China is probably the largest importer of wood products of illegal origin. Other primary importers of illegal logs or wood products are Japan, the EU, and the US.
27 Sep 2012 - by GRID-Arendal
5
Soy Expansion in the Brazilian Amazon frontier Soy Expansion in the Brazilian Amazon frontier
Often, small-scale farmers settle the areas along logging roads in order to burn secondary or cleared forest for crop production. These farmers are eventually pushed or bought-out by large-scale cattle ranchers or soy prodcution owners.
27 Sep 2012 - by GRID-Arendal
3
Plantation in Indonesia: a new frontier in black wood laundering? Plantation in Indonesia: a new frontier in black wood laundering?
Much of the logging in Indonesia, takes place in association with the establishment of palm oil or other plantations. As the forest is cleared for plantations, it is common practic to cut beyond the plantation area, or to get a permit for a larger area than initially planted.
27 Sep 2012 - by GRID-Arendal
2
Illegal Logging and Log Laundering Illegal Logging and Log Laundering
A key element in illegal logging schemes is the laundering of the illegal timber and other wood products. This is the primary way that illegal logs are transported, processed and exported or manufactured, thereby bypassing the majority of certification schemes and efforts to avoid illegal imports.
27 Sep 2012 - by GRID-Arendal
4
By-passing flow of investment to illegal logging By-passing flow of investment to illegal logging
The Norwegian sovereign wealth fund is an example of a governance mechanism employed in an attempt to limit investment in companies involved in illegal logging.
27 Sep 2012 - by GRID-Arendal
3
Black wood dependency Black wood dependency
China is probably the largest importer of wood products with illegal origin. Other primary importers of illegal logs or wood products are Japan, the EU and the US.
27 Sep 2012 - by GRID-Arendal
6
Illegal Logging and the Congo Conflict Illegal Logging and the Congo Conflict
Illegal logging directly fuels many conflicts as timber is a resource available for conflict profiteers or to finance arms sales. Without public order, militants, guerillas or military units impose taxes on logging companies or charcoal producers, issue false export permits and control border points. They frequently demand the removal of all vehicle check points and public patrolling of resource-rich areas as part of the peace conditions followin...
27 Sep 2012 - by GRID-Arendal
3
Illegal charcoal trade Illegal charcoal trade
Many protected areas are home to an abundance of rare wood species in high demand for panels, floors and furniture. They may also hold some of the last remaining concentrations of high density wood for charcoal.
27 Sep 2012 - by GRID-Arendal
3
      1 2 3 4 | Next