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Change in proportion of land area covered by forests in Zimbabwe Change in proportion of land area covered by forests in Zimbabwe
An initial impact of land reform was deforestation as forests were cleared to accommodate larger numbers of farmers, but the impact is yet to be quantified. Figure 4.52 shows that the proportion of land area covered by forests dropped by eight per cent per decade in the period from 1990 to 2010, according to FAO estimates.
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Wood production in Zimbabwe Wood production in Zimbabwe
Between 2000 and 2005, Zimbabwe had the sixth highest rate of deforestation in Africa, averaging 3 130 sq km per year (FAO 2005), with increasing uncontrolled bush and forest fires. Agriculture is responsible for an estimated 700 sq km (roughly one quarter) of this annual loss, while heavy dependence on wood for fuel and commercial logging account for the rest.
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Change in proportion of land area covered by forests in Zambia Change in proportion of land area covered by forests in Zambia
The proportion of land area covered by forests has dropped more than six per cent since 1990, leaving two-thirds of the land under forests as shown in this figure.
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Fuelwood production in Zambia Fuelwood production in Zambia
The consumption of fuelwood is expected to increase by 35 per cent between 2000 and 2020 (FAO 2003) and had already reached a level of 8.8 million cu m per year by 2009 (Figure 4.44). Much of the fuelwood is converted to charcoal for use in urban households or rural industries. Eighty per cent of the population continues to use solid fuels, although this is down from 86 per cent in 1990 (Government of Zambia 2008). Alternative methods need to ...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Deforestation in Zambezi Basin Countries Deforestation in Zambezi Basin Countries
There is a growing body of evidence that the rate and extent of deforestation contribute to climate change in the Basin (SARDC and HBS 2010). The major causes of deforestation in the Basin are agricultural expansion, fuelwood collection, harvesting of non-timber forest products, commercial harvesting of natural/ indigenous timber species and forest fires. These are some of the issues that must be addressed in order to stem the destruction of for...
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Wood exports from Congo Basin Wood exports from Congo Basin
China is probably the largest importer of wood products of illegal origin. Other primary importers of illegal logs or wood products are Japan, the EU, and the US.
27 Sep 2012 - by GRID-Arendal
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Soy Expansion in the Brazilian Amazon frontier Soy Expansion in the Brazilian Amazon frontier
Often, small-scale farmers settle the areas along logging roads in order to burn secondary or cleared forest for crop production. These farmers are eventually pushed or bought-out by large-scale cattle ranchers or soy prodcution owners.
27 Sep 2012 - by GRID-Arendal
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Plantation in Indonesia: a new frontier in black wood laundering? Plantation in Indonesia: a new frontier in black wood laundering?
Much of the logging in Indonesia, takes place in association with the establishment of palm oil or other plantations. As the forest is cleared for plantations, it is common practic to cut beyond the plantation area, or to get a permit for a larger area than initially planted.
27 Sep 2012 - by GRID-Arendal
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Illegal Logging and Log Laundering Illegal Logging and Log Laundering
A key element in illegal logging schemes is the laundering of the illegal timber and other wood products. This is the primary way that illegal logs are transported, processed and exported or manufactured, thereby bypassing the majority of certification schemes and efforts to avoid illegal imports.
27 Sep 2012 - by GRID-Arendal
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By-passing flow of investment to illegal logging By-passing flow of investment to illegal logging
The Norwegian sovereign wealth fund is an example of a governance mechanism employed in an attempt to limit investment in companies involved in illegal logging.
27 Sep 2012 - by GRID-Arendal
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Black wood dependency Black wood dependency
China is probably the largest importer of wood products with illegal origin. Other primary importers of illegal logs or wood products are Japan, the EU and the US.
27 Sep 2012 - by GRID-Arendal
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Illegal Logging and the Congo Conflict Illegal Logging and the Congo Conflict
Illegal logging directly fuels many conflicts as timber is a resource available for conflict profiteers or to finance arms sales. Without public order, militants, guerillas or military units impose taxes on logging companies or charcoal producers, issue false export permits and control border points. They frequently demand the removal of all vehicle check points and public patrolling of resource-rich areas as part of the peace conditions followin...
27 Sep 2012 - by GRID-Arendal
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Illegal charcoal trade Illegal charcoal trade
Many protected areas are home to an abundance of rare wood species in high demand for panels, floors and furniture. They may also hold some of the last remaining concentrations of high density wood for charcoal.
27 Sep 2012 - by GRID-Arendal
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The health of our forests The health of our forests
The importance of the world's forests to global efforts to reduce carbon emissions cannot be underestimated. While living forests are vital to reducing carbon levels in our atmosphere, deforestation accounts for an estimated 17 per cent of global carbon emissions - around 1.5 times greater than those from all the world's air, road, rail and shipping traffic combined.
27 Sep 2012 - by GRID-Arendal
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Illegal logging bottlenecks Illegal logging bottlenecks
Illegal timber has to be aggregated and funnelled by road or river transport to a limited number of destinations domestically or for export, which creates a bottleneck in the illegal trade.
27 Sep 2012 - by GRID-Arendal
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Human use and conversion of tropical forests Human use and conversion of tropical forests
Tropical forests hold the largest terrestrial carbon store and are active carbon sinks. Reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation is a vital component of tackling dangerous climate change. In addition, tackling illegal and ill-managed logging will be an important part of reducing emissions from forestry.
27 May 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Deforestation in the MAB, Guatemala case study Deforestation in the MAB, Guatemala case study
Deforestation in the MAB, Guatemala case study
11 Jul 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Danish emissions of anthropogenic greenhouse gases Danish emissions of anthropogenic greenhouse gases
The graph shows emissions of anthropogenic greenhouse gases in Denmark from 1990- 1995 and projections to 2020 according to second national communication to UNFCCC. Greenhouse gases are largely results of human activities, including industrial processes, fossil fuel combustion, and changes in land use, such as deforestation.
06 Nov 2006 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Climate change vulnerability in Africa Climate change vulnerability in Africa
Multiple stresses make most of Africa highly vulnerable to environmental changes, and climate change is likely to increase this vulnerability. This graphic shows which of the regions of Africa (North Africa, West Africa, Central Africa, East Africa, Southern Africa and the Western Indian Ocean Islands) are most vulnerable to specific impacts of climate change. These impacts include desertification, sea level rise, reduced freshwater availability,...
17 May 2005 - by Delphine Digout, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Deforestation in West Africa: Case Cote-d'Ivoire Deforestation in West Africa: Case Cote-d'Ivoire
The average annual rate of change in total forest area from 1990 to 2000 for the whole of Africa was estimated to be -0.74 %, equivalent to losing more than 5 million ha of forest a year, an area roughly the size of Togo, and the highest rate of any region. (UNEP: GEO [Global Environment Outlook] 3). This graphic shows how deforestation has occurred in Cote d'Ivoire (the Ivory Coast) by comparing the area's forests in 1955 and in 1988. It shows a...
17 May 2005 - by Rekacewicz, Philippe, based on a sketch by Le Monde, Paris; UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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