HomeAboutActivitiesMapsPhotosPublicationsNews
 
Home >> Consumption

Tag: Consumption

Existing and estimated hydropower capacity in the Balkans, 2006 Existing and estimated hydropower capacity in the Balkans, 2006
Hydroelectric power covers a significant share of electricity consumption in the region (43 percent in 2004). Hydroelectric power dropped noticeably due to lower rainfall in 2002 and 2003, but the increase in overall electricity consumption nevertheless seems likely to continue driving demand upwards.
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Stephane Kluser, Matthias Beilstein, Ieva Rucevska, Cecile Marin, Otto Simonett
3
Global Wood Consumption Global Wood Consumption
No data
20 Jun 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz assisted by Cecile Marin, Agnes Stienne, Guilio Frigieri, Riccardo Pravettoni, Laura Margueritte and Marion Lecoquierre.
4
Woodfuel Consumption Trends and Outlook Woodfuel Consumption Trends and Outlook
No data
20 Jun 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz assisted by Cecile Marin, Agnes Stienne, Guilio Frigieri, Riccardo Pravettoni, Laura Margueritte and Marion Lecoquierre.
3
Solid Biomass Consumption Including Woodfuel Solid Biomass Consumption Including Woodfuel
Fuelwood and charcoal from forests have long provided energy for heating, cooking and industry. Almost 90 per cent of the wood harvested in Africa, and 40 per cent in Asia and the Pacific, is used for fuel (FAO 2006a). Wood pellets, typically produced in North America and Europe from sawdust and other timber by-products, are increasingly used in stoves, boilers and power stations (Peksa-Blanchard et al. 2007)
20 Jun 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz assisted by Cecile Marin, Agnes Stienne, Guilio Frigieri, Riccardo Pravettoni, Laura Margueritte and Marion Lecoquierre.
4
Landfilling and incinerating still leading in Europe Landfilling and incinerating still leading in Europe
As the garbage pile gets higher and the environmental conscience sharpens, it is now recognized that producing waste at this rate is no longer acceptable. Now is the time for “integrated waste management” and its motto – “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle” (the famous 3 Rs) – a practice that most developing countries started to apply long before it was even formulated. As waste disposal strategies evolve, the consumption rates in the developed world are que...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Mobile phones per 1000 people Mobile phones per 1000 people
The Basel Convention has before it an amendment which would ban the export of hazardous waste for disposal to developing countries. Some countries (for example those in the European Union) have already implemented this proposed amendment. In addition countries like China have banned the importation of e-waste, although significant volumes are still entering the country illegally.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Total waste generation in 2001, selected countries Total waste generation in 2001, selected countries
On a global scale, calculating the amount of waste being generated presents a problem. There are a number of issues, including a lack of reporting by many countries and inconsistencies in the way countries report (definitions and surveying methods employed by countries vary considerably). The Basel Convention has estimated the amount of hazardous and other waste generated for 2000 and 2001 at 318 and 338 millions tonnes respectively. These figure...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
5
Different approaches and overlapping definitions to waste Different approaches and overlapping definitions to waste
Waste is generated in all sorts of ways. Its composition and volume largely depend on consumption patterns and the industrial and economic structures in place. Air quality, water and soil contamination, space consumption and odors all affect our quality of life. Waste is a complex, subjective and sometimes controversial issue. There are many ways to define, describe and count it depending on how you look at it. Citizens, technicians, businessmen,...
14 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
2
Raw material consumption in United States and Western Europe (Steel, aluminium, plastics and cement) Raw material consumption in United States and Western Europe (Steel, aluminium, plastics and cement)
The global consumption of key raw materials is rising fast. Over the 20-year period ending in 1994, the world population increased by 40% – in that same period, the world consumption of cement increased by 77%, and plastics by just under 200%… Among raw materials used for construction, only crude steel registered a growth rate that was significantly lower (only 3% from 1974 to 1994) than the rate of population increase. (University of Minnesota, ...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Number of personal computers Number of personal computers
It is estimated that there are over a billion personal computers in the world at present. In developed countries these have an average life span of only 2 years. In the United States alone there are over 300 million obsolete computers. (US National Safety Council).
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Mining effects on rainfall drainage Mining effects on rainfall drainage
The Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) is the number one environmental problem facing the mining industry. AMD occurs when sulphide-bearing minerals in rock are exposed to air and water, changing the sulphide to sulphuric acid. It can devastate aquatic habitats, is difficult to treat with existing technology, and once started, can continue for centuries (Roman mine sites in Great Britain continue to generate acid drainage 2000 years after mining ceased)....
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
5
Raw material consumption, global trends and US share Raw material consumption, global trends and US share
A small minority of rich countries are responsible for a large part of the raw material consumption. All together the developed countries comprise only 22% of the world population, but they consume more than 60% of the industrial raw materials.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Waste and car production Waste and car production
The life cycle approach gives a more complete picture of the waste and energy associated with a product. Our daily choices determine the amount of waste we produce. As consumers, our relationship to a product happens only during a short phase of its existence. This chart reflects the waste material during car production, as well as the distribution of material in a typical car.
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Information and communication technology expenditures Information and communication technology expenditures
The high tech boom has brought with it a new type of waste – electronic waste, a category that barely existed 20 years ago. Now e-waste represents the biggest and fastest growing manufacturing waste. The black and white TV turned to colour, the basic mobile phone needed a camera, personal organizer and music, and who wants last year's computer when it can't handle the latest software? As we continually update and invent new products the life of t...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Waste generation scheme Waste generation scheme
The graphic gives a general illustration of a waste generation & management scheme. Using car production as a example, the associated text includes references as follows: Raw Materials: Mining of minerals: copper, iron, lead, zinc, and aluminum (generating waste in the neighborhood of the mines), etc. Production: During the final assembly: paints, coatings, lubricants and fluids (generating excess materials – a specific type of waste) Distributi...
14 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Projected trends in regional municipal waste generation Projected trends in regional municipal waste generation
Municipal waste is everything collected and treated by municipalities. Only part of it is comes from households, the rest is generated by small businesses, commercial and other municipal activities. So it is produced from both consumption and production processes. Like all waste, municipal waste is on the rise and it is growing faster than the population, a natural result of our increasing consumption rate and the shortening of product life-spans...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Packaging production and recycling: selected European countries Packaging production and recycling: selected European countries
Recycling activities are economically important. Collection, sorting and reprocessing represent job opportunities (especially in the paper recycling sector). They also lower energy and municipal waste disposal costs. Recycling and reprocessing are growth industries, which also support some downstream sectors like the steel industry.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
5
Ability of countries to support their citizens from their own environment Ability of countries to support their citizens from their own environment
The Ecological Footprint measures the amount of productive land area needed to support a nation’s consumption and waste. This indicator shows that in many countries, as well as for the planet as a whole, the demand for natural resources, or the 'ecological capacity', exceeds the amount available. Countries that are not able to support their national consumption with their own natural resources are running at an 'ecological deficit'. Therefore the...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Personal computers per 1000 people Personal computers per 1000 people
It is estimated that there are over a billion personal computers in the world at present. In developed countries these have an average life span of only 2 years. In the United States alone there are over 300 million obsolete computers. (US National Safety Council).
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Trends in transboundary movement of waste among Parties to the Basel Convention Trends in transboundary movement of waste among Parties to the Basel Convention
The amount of waste on the move is increasing rapidly. Reports to the Basel Convention on the control of transboundary movements of hazardous wastes and their disposal suggest that between 1993 and 2001 the amount of waste crisscrossing the globe increased from 2 million tonnes to more than 8.5 million tonnes. What is this material that is being traded between countries, where is it from and where is it going? Unfortunately data on waste movement...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Previous | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Next