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Mercury and human health Mercury and human health
Mercury can enter the food chain either from agricultural prod- ucts or from seafood. It was widely used in agriculture, and at least 459 people are known to have died in Iraq after grain treated with a fungicide containing mercury was imported in 1971 and used to make flour (Greenwood, 1985). Those who showed the greatest effects were the children of women who had eaten contaminated bread during pregnancy. Human groups at risk include the mil...
11 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Global mercury consumption in 2005 Global mercury consumption in 2005
Most of the world’s estimated 600,000 tonnes of mercury de- posits are found in a handful of countries, including China, Kyrgyzstan, Mexico, Peru, Russia, Slovenia, Spain and Ukraine (USGS, 2012). Primary mining (where mercury is the target ore, not extracted as a byproduct) is now limited to even fewer countries, with only one (Kyrgyzstan) still exporting. Given present trends, it appears likely that most uses of mercury will continue to decl...
11 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Mercury in food and products Mercury in food and products
Even now, mercury is commonplace in daily life. Electrical and electronic devices, switches (including thermostats) and relays, measuring and control equipment, energy- efficient fluorescent light bulbs, batteries, mascara, skin- lightening creams and other cosmetics which contain mercury, dental fillings and a host of other consumables are used across the globe. Food products obtained from fish, terrestrial mammals and other products such as ric...
11 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Net national savings in 2001 adjusted for investments in human capital, natural resource depletion, and damage caused by pollution compared with standard net national savings measurements Net national savings in 2001 adjusted for investments in human capital, natural resource depletion, and damage caused by pollution compared with standard net national savings measurements
Positive values for national savings (expressed as a percent of gross national income) reflect a gain in wealth for a nation. Standard measures do not incorporate investments in human capital (in standard national accounting, these expenditures are treated as consumption), depletion of a variety of natural resources, or pollution damages.
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Consumption of Nitrogen fertilizers in EU 15 Consumption of Nitrogen fertilizers in EU 15
The graph shows Consumption of Nitrogen fertilizers in EU 15 from 1970 to 1992. The main source of nitrogen in soils is from organic matter. Nitrogen also comes from sources such as factories. A common concern with these forms of inorganic nitrogen is the incremental amount of nitrates they add to the nitrogen cycle, which may threaten groundwater, inland waters and fisheries.
14 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Consumption of pesticides (active ingredients) Consumption of pesticides (active ingredients)
The graphic shows consumption of pesticide (active ingredients) from 1980 to 2010. Pesticides are natural chemicals or altered versions of natural chemicals used in agriculture to control various sorts of pests such as different types of insects, rodents, weed and fungi.
14 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Consumption of ozone depleting substances Consumption of ozone depleting substances
Graphics from the year 2000 Baltic 21 biannual indicator-based status report on sustainable development in the Baltic Sea Region (Baltic 21 Series No 1/2000). This graphic shows the consumption of the ozone depleting substances Halons and CFCs.
10 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Industrial CO2 emissions Industrial CO2 emissions
Graphics from the year 2000 Baltic 21 biannual indicator-based status report on sustainable development in the Baltic Sea Region (Baltic 21 Series No 1/2000). The graphic shows industrial emissions of CO2, which includes Mineral products, chemical industry, metal production, Other production, Production of Halocarbons, Sulphur Hexafluoride and consumption of Sulphur Hexafluoride and Halocarbons.
10 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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BSR industrial energy consumption, renewable and non-renewable BSR industrial energy consumption, renewable and non-renewable
Graphics from the year 2000 Baltic 21 biannual indicator-based status report on sustainable development in the Baltic Sea Region (Baltic 21 Series No 1/2000). The graphic shows that the total industrial energy consumption has declined. However, it also shows that the proportion of the total energy consumption that is renewable has remained unchanged from 1990 1997.
10 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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BSR relative natural gas consumption BSR relative natural gas consumption
Graphics from the year 2000 Baltic 21 biannual indicator-based status report on sustainable development in the Baltic Sea Region (Baltic 21 Series No 1/2000). BSR relative natural gas consumption has remained constant from 1990 to 1997.
10 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Gross consumption of electricity in 1996 and prognoses until 2005 Gross consumption of electricity in 1996 and prognoses until 2005
The graphic shows gross consumption of electricity in 1996 and prognoses until 2005. The projections to 2005 shows an increase from both 1996 and 2000 in the consumption of electricity in all the nordic countries.
13 Feb 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Fertilizer consumption in the Nordic countries, 1980-1996 Fertilizer consumption in the Nordic countries, 1980-1996
The graph shows the consumption of fertilizers in the Nordic countries form 1980 to 1996 with projections to 2006. The fertilizers included are phosphate, Potash and Nitrogen which are the three most important nutrients for crop growth.
13 Feb 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Electricity consumption by category in the Nordic countries in 1996 Electricity consumption by category in the Nordic countries in 1996
The graphic shows electricity consumption by category in the Nordic countries in 1996. Developed countries, and Nordic nations in particular, have the highes energy consumption per capita in the world. Over the last decade developed countries have attempted to reduce the over-all energy demand.This includes attempts to increase energy efficiency in households and industrial processes.
13 Feb 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Electricity consumption in kWh per capita Electricity consumption in kWh per capita
The graph shows the consumption of electricity in kWh per capita. The graph shows that developed countries, and Nordic nations in particular have the highest energy consumption per capita. Please note that this figure is old and outdated
01 Nov 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Electricity consumption in Baltic region countries in 1995. in TWh Electricity consumption in Baltic region countries in 1995. in TWh
The graphic shows electricity consumption in Baltic region countries in 1995 in TWh. Russia and Germany are the biggest consumers of electricity overall, however it is worth noticing that Nordic nations by far have the highes energy consumption per capita.
13 Feb 2006 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Energy consumption, economic development and CO2 emissions; selected Latin America countries Energy consumption, economic development and CO2 emissions; selected Latin America countries
As a rule of thumb, economic growth is closely related to growth in energy consumption because the more energy is used, the higher the economic growth. However, it is possible to decouple energy consumption and economic growth to some extent.. More efficient use of energy may entail economic growth and a reduction in energy use. Energy efficiency may very well be an economic driving force. With an increasing use of sustainable energy sources, th...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Use of renewables and combustible waste for energy production in 2001; Latin America and the Caribbean Use of renewables and combustible waste for energy production in 2001; Latin America and the Caribbean
Approximately 12 % of the world’s energy supply comes from renewable energy sources (biomass, waste and other renewables, excluding hydropower). The average renewable share in Latin America is higher than the world average,. But even if the energy supply from renewables will increase in Latin America, the percentage share of renewables of total energy supply is projected to decrease in the years to come. (World Energy Outlook 2004). Latin Ameri...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Energy consumption in the countries of the Balkans, 1990-2004 Energy consumption in the countries of the Balkans, 1990-2004
The region's political and economic instability has discouraged any substantial investment in the energy sector. Except for some places such as Kosovo, the Balkans have no fossil fuel deposits, which are significant power source on a global scale. The Balkan countries are neither big energy producers nor consumers, so the region can rely on renewable energy to cater for tomorrow’s growing electricity demand.
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Stephane Kluser, Matthias Beilstein, Ieva Rucevska, Cecile Marin, Otto Simonett
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Share of renewable sources, out of energy consumption in the Balkans, 2005 Share of renewable sources, out of energy consumption in the Balkans, 2005
Further development of hydroelectric power will depend on several factors, perhaps the most important being market deregulation. Specific measures are needed to encourage hydroelectric power. One specific measure would be to support new investment in production facilities, this being the best way of meeting environmental challenges and improving the stability of supply.
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Stephane Kluser, Matthias Beilstein, Ieva Rucevska, Cecile Marin, Otto Simonett
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Major oil pipeline projects Major oil pipeline projects
A number of oil pipelines are currently under study or construction in the Balkans: the US registered Albanian-Macedonian-Bulgarian Oil Corporation (AMBO) project will carry oil from the Caspian to the Mediterranean, via Bulgaria, Macedonia and Albania; the Adria Group project will channel Russian oil to the Omisalj terminal on the Croatian coast.
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz
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