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Tag: Climatic change

Changing Caspian Changing Caspian
At present, most scientists seem to agree that climate change plays a significant role in sea level fluctuations in the Caspian Sea, since temperature increases and changes in precipitation directly impact the overall water balance – termed total inflow and evaporation (Panin 2006).
17 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Selected impacts of climate change in the Caspian basin Selected impacts of climate change in the Caspian basin
The Caspian Sea, though a land-locked water basin not directly affected by global sea level rise, is being similarly impacted by climate change. The Caspian Basin plays an important role in atmospheric processes, regional water balance and also influences microclimates. Climatic phenomena in the Caspian Sea region are linked to the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), with fluctuations in atmospheric air pressure affecting temperatures, moisture and...
17 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Wood exports from Congo Basin Wood exports from Congo Basin
China is probably the largest importer of wood products of illegal origin. Other primary importers of illegal logs or wood products are Japan, the EU, and the US.
27 Sep 2012 - by GRID-Arendal
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Annual Value of Illegal Logging Annual Value of Illegal Logging
The official value of the global wood trade has been estimated at around US $327 billion dollars (FAO, 2007; UNEP 2009). If illegal logging consists of as much as 10-30 per cent of the total logging worldwide, with some estimates as highg as 20-50 per cent when the laundering of illegal wood is included, then the value of it is at least US $30-100 billion (NCB-Rome 2008; INTERPOL/World Bank 2009).
27 Sep 2012 - by GRID-Arendal
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The health of our forests The health of our forests
The importance of the world's forests to global efforts to reduce carbon emissions cannot be underestimated. While living forests are vital to reducing carbon levels in our atmosphere, deforestation accounts for an estimated 17 per cent of global carbon emissions - around 1.5 times greater than those from all the world's air, road, rail and shipping traffic combined.
27 Sep 2012 - by GRID-Arendal
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Climate change in Mongolia Climate change in Mongolia
Herders from both the East and the West Taiga are concerned about the environmental changes that are taking place in their homeland. They report that snow seems to take longer to melt during springtime. Summers seem shorter and hotter, making it more challenging for the reindeer that prefer cooler temperatures. Patches of snow and ice that used to last through summer are now disappearing in mid-July. The rivers have less water and the ...
24 Mar 2012 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID-Arendal
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Selected impacts of climate change in the Caspian basin Selected impacts of climate change in the Caspian basin
Several severe droughts have affected various parts of the region in recent years. They seem to confirm scientific models, which, in addition to higher mean temperatures, generally predict more extreme weather events. Droughts affect both crop production and the health of livestock. But the availability of freshwater, on which many sectors of the economy – and human well-being – depend, is also linked to more remote climatic processes. I...
07 Mar 2012 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID-Arendal
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Climate change: processes, characteristics and threats Climate change: processes, characteristics and threats
Most people have heard about climate change, they might even express a real concern about it, but how many would actually consider it a threat? Because the changes can be slow and sometimes difficult to identify within the normal variation of climatic conditions, many of us think they will not affect our lives. However, some parts of the world are already being severely affected by climatic change – both the people and the environment. And unfort...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Primary threats to the marine environment Primary threats to the marine environment
Each of the big five stressors (not in order of magnitude), 1) Climate change; 2) Pollution (mainly coastal), 3) Fragmentation and habitat loss (from e.g. dredging/trawling, use of explosives in fishing on coral reefs etc.), 4) Invasive species infestations, and 5) Over-harvest from fisheries may individually or combined result in severe impacts on the biological production of the worlds oceans and the services they provide to billions of people ...
01 Nov 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Selected impacts of climate change in the Caspian Sea region Selected impacts of climate change in the Caspian Sea region
As the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere increases, the temperature in the European part of the Caspian Sea region will continue to rise, at least at first. Some researchers have recently expressed fears that the warm Gulf Stream current in the Atlantic Ocean may slow down due to the changes in the Artic environment and oceanic circulation.
01 Oct 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Climate change and malaria, scenario for 2050 Climate change and malaria, scenario for 2050
With climate conditions changing in the future, due to increased concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, conditions for pests also change. The primary Malaria agent, the falciparum malaria parasite, will be able to spread into new areas, as displayed in this map, by 2050 using the Hadley CM2 high scenario. Other areas, not displayed in the map, will be uninhabitable by the parasite, and thus free of the pest.
01 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Shift in climatic zones, Arctic scenario Shift in climatic zones, Arctic scenario
The scenarios from the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA) project that temperatures will increase dramatically in the Arctic, more than in many other parts of the world. This leads to effects, such as the decrease of area (e.g. tundra) under continous permafrost, the northward move of the tree line and the decrease of Arctic Sea Ice. The synthesis is based on several different models and ensables and this map depicts the situation at the end...
01 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Monthly average sea ice extent globally and in both hemispheres Monthly average sea ice extent globally and in both hemispheres
In the Arctic, winter sea ice extends over an area of approximately 15 million km2 at its peak in March and up to 7 million km2 in September, at the end of the summer melt season. Corresponding numbers for the Southern Ocean around the Antarctic continent are approximately 3 million km2 in February during the Antarctic summer and 18 million km2 at the height of winter in September. In regions with seasonal sea ice, the ice cover achieves a thickn...
01 Oct 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Monthly average sea ice extent globally and in both hemispheres (radial) Monthly average sea ice extent globally and in both hemispheres (radial)
In the Arctic, winter sea ice extends over an area of approximately 15 million km2 at its peak in March and up to 7 million km2 in September, at the end of the summer melt season. Corresponding numbers for the Southern Ocean around the Antarctic continent are approximately 3 million km2 in February during the Antarctic summer and 18 million km2 at the height of winter in September. In regions with seasonal sea ice, the ice cover achieves a thickn...
01 Oct 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Permafrost loss in peatlands of northern Quebec, 1957-2003 Permafrost loss in peatlands of northern Quebec, 1957-2003
Over recent years, the southern limit of permafrost in northern peatlands has retreated by 39 km on average and by as much as 200 km in some parts of the Canadian Arctic. Although regional warming by 1.32°C has accelerated permafrost thaw in northern Manitoba, Canada, these changes are not exclusively linked to temperature rise. The loss of permafrost in Quebec has been attributed to the insulating effect of increased snowfall since the late 1950...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
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Gender (im)balance in the delegation of parties (COP) on climate change Gender (im)balance in the delegation of parties (COP) on climate change
Critical importance is the under-representation of women in policy and decision-making institutions, in dialogue on adaptation to climate change, in the governance of natural resources and in other important livelihood dimensions. Numerous position papers on climate change recognise and argue the importance of integrating gender issues and increasing women’s participation in climate change negotiations and processes (IUCN – The International Uni...
01 Nov 2011 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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