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Global Ocean Acidification Global Ocean Acidification
As carbon concentrations in the atmosphere increase, so do concentrations in the ocean, with resultant acidification as a natural chemical process.
06 Oct 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Threat of bad bugs Threat of bad bugs
Locust invasions are a major threat to the agriculture, pasture, food security and social stability of rural populations occupying a very large area from Western Africa to Northern India. Large amounts of chemicals are being used to check this plague, at considerable risk to the environment and public health. As a hazard locusts depend on the wind and rain to travel.
03 Oct 2006 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Natural and industrial disasters Natural and industrial disasters
Some places are more prone to disaster than others. But that does it take to turn a cyclone into a disaster in one place and just a climatic event somewhere else? The main reasons are obvious enough. Economically deprived people living in shacks are more likely to suffer from any calamity. Rich countries may have more to lose financially, but they also have more resources for anticipating hazards. There are many ways of determining vulnerability,...
01 Feb 2006 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Radioactive, chemical and biological hazards in Central Asia Radioactive, chemical and biological hazards in Central Asia
The Soviet development model for Central Asia was based on building large-scale irrigation schemes enabling the region to become a major cotton producer and expanding the mining and processing industry. Industrial operations in the region paid little attention to the environment and public health, resulting in the accumulation of pollutants in the local environment. Today, not only active industrial facilities constitute a threat to environment, ...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Acidification due to climate change - impacts for oceans and coral reefs Acidification due to climate change - impacts for oceans and coral reefs
As carbon concentrations in the atmosphere increase from land use changes and emissions from fossil fuels - so do concentrations in the ocean, with resultant acidification as a natural chemical process. The skeletons of coldwater coral reefs may dissolve, perhaps already within a few decades. The impacts will be greatest at high latitudes. This will have an impact on all marine organisms with calcerous shells and body parts, in addition to coral ...
01 Feb 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Transboundary Movement of Hazardous Wastes and Other Wastes from Non-OECD Countries to OECD Countries in 1997 Transboundary Movement of Hazardous Wastes and Other Wastes from Non-OECD Countries to OECD Countries in 1997
This graphic shows the total transboundary movement in 1997 of hazardous wastes and other wastes from non-OECD to OECD countries that were reporting parties in 1997 to the Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and Their Disposal. The graphic shows the total amounts of hazardous wastes and other wastes transferred, in millions of metric tonnes, based on export data from non-OECD countries, and based on impo...
06 Mar 2006 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Disposal Operations in 1997 in Million Metric Tonnes Disposal Operations in 1997 in Million Metric Tonnes
This figure shows the total amounts of hazardous waste disposed of through 16 different methods in 1997 by parties to the Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and Their Disposal. It shows the amounts based on export data and based on import data. List of D-codes (disposal methods) from the full report: 'D1, D2 and D4 (landfill, land treatment); D3 and D12 (underground storage); D5 (specially engineered la...
06 Mar 2006 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Transboundary Movement of Hazardous Wastes and Other Wastes Among all Reporting Parties in 1997 Transboundary Movement of Hazardous Wastes and Other Wastes Among all Reporting Parties in 1997
This graphic shows the total transboundary movement in 1997 of hazardous wastes and other wastes among all reporting parties to the Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and Their Disposal. The graphic shows the total amounts of hazardous wastes and other wastes transferred, in millions of metric tonnes, based on export data, and based on import data. The amounts are shown according to Y categories, which ...
06 Mar 2006 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Mining waste emissions to land and water in Australia Mining waste emissions to land and water in Australia
PRTRs (Pollutant Release and Transfer Registers) are databases of chemical releases to air, land and water from factories or other sources. Targeting a broad public audience, they support our right to information on toxic waste and air pollution. The Australian National Pollutant Inventory (NPI), for instance, not only provides the public with free access to data on its website but also helps facilities estimate and report emissions.
01 Oct 2006 - by Emmanuelle Bournay
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Barren Lands Barren Lands
Deforestation is well known for aggravating erosion. Bare soil has no protection against heavy rain, washing away immediately. On hillsides, it readily turns into mudslides leaving people very little time to seek refuge and cutting deep ravines into the earth. And where deforested land was turned into cultivated fields, the soil is likely to be overused and exploited through intensive use of fertiliser.
01 Feb 2006 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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No shelter - refugees, sanitation and slums No shelter - refugees, sanitation and slums
In the face of any calamity we instinctively take refuge under a roof. This is little use against a chemical or nuclear accident, but for many there is no other resort. The number of people currently living in shanty towns is rising in all the big cities of the developing world, where urban growth is generally uncontrolled. The map shows how small the proportion of city dwellers with improved access to sanitation in many places is, giving an ide...
01 Feb 2006 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Industrial hot spots Tisza river basin Industrial hot spots Tisza river basin
On 30 January 2000 a tailings dam at the Aurul Mine in Romania overflowed and released 100,000 cubic metres of effluent containing cyanide into the Tisza River. By the time the overflow was detected, the alarm raised and emergency measures taken to staunch the flow, heavily contaminated wastewater had reached the Danube River and was on its way to Hungary and beyond. Traces of cyanide, albeit at a very low level, were still detected in the rive...
01 Feb 2006 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Environment and Security priority areas in the Ferghana Valley Environment and Security priority areas in the Ferghana Valley
The graphic shows an outline of the areas within the Ferghana Valley which are subjects to disputes over water resources and borders, disputes between private and collective farmers, deforestation and overuse of pasture. The map also show areas of industrial pollution and chemical risks caused by badly maintained radioactive dumps, tailing containments and several working industrial facilities.
16 Mar 2006 - by Viktor Novikov and Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Climate change and natural disaster impacts in the Ferghana Valley Climate change and natural disaster impacts in the Ferghana Valley
Central Asia is a disaster-prone area, exposed to various natural hazards such as floods, droughts, avalanches, rockslide and earthquakes. It is also vulnerable to man-made disasters related to industrial activity and the radioactive and chemical dumps inherited from the Soviet period. Several factors - population density in disaster-prone areas, high overall population growth, poverty, land and water use, failure to comply with building codes an...
16 Mar 2006 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Radioactive, chemical and biological hazards in Central Asia Radioactive, chemical and biological hazards in Central Asia
The Soviet development model for Central Asia was based on building large-scale irrigation schemes enabling the region to become a major cotton producer and expanding the mining and processing industry. Industrial operations in the region paid little attention to the environment and public health, resulting in the accumulation of pollutants in the local environment. Today, not only active industrial facilities constitute a threat to environment, ...
16 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Industrial pollution and waste hotspots in the Ferghana Valley Industrial pollution and waste hotspots in the Ferghana Valley
Mercury mining, uranium mining, chemical and textile industries, oil facilities and processing plants which contribute to the contamination of the soil with highly toxic heavy metals are recognized as environmental challenges in the region. Even though past spills and contaminations have caused tensions between the different countries of the region, officials do not consistently regard environmental pollution by existing facilities as a security ...
16 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Barents Sea vulnerability index Barents Sea vulnerability index
Areas that are vulnerable to pollution from oil and chemical spills where identified using a multiple index in a geographical analysis. Factors, including shoreline sensitivity, corals, benthic conditions, sea birds, marine mammals, fish and fisheries and other sea resources where taken into account and weighed for their importance.
06 Dec 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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The Antarctic hole The Antarctic hole
Despite progress achieved under the Montreal Protocol, the ozone “hole” over the Antarctic was larger than ever in September 2006. This was due to particularly cold temperatures in the stratosphere, but also to the chemical stability of ozone-depleting substances – it takes about 40 years for them to break down.
29 Nov 2007 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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The Antarctic hole The Antarctic hole
Despite progress achieved under the Montreal Protocol, the ozone “hole” over the Antarctic was larger than ever in September 2006. This was due to particularly cold temperatures in the stratosphere, but also to the chemical stability of ozone-depleting substances – it takes about 40 years for them to break down.
31 Jul 2008 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Energy cost of various construction materials Energy cost of various construction materials
CO2 emissions are not directly deducible from energy costs. Concrete for instance is a very CO2-intensive material due to the emissions from chemical processes involved in its production, despite the relatively low energy costs per cubic metre.
05 Jan 2009 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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