HomeAboutActivitiesMapsPhotosPublicationsNews
 
Home >> Central Asia

Tag: Central Asia

Metal production in the South Kyrgyz mines of the Ferghana Valley Metal production in the South Kyrgyz mines of the Ferghana Valley
In the soviet period the industrial operations paid little attention to environment or public health, resulting in the accumulation of pollutants in the local environment. Because of their vulnerability to natural hazards, previous history of accidents, and their position along water courses and in the vicinity of towns and cities in transboundary areas, tailing dumps at both active and closed mining enterprises constitute an environmental as wel...
16 Mar 2006 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Walnut forest in the Jalal-Abad province (Kyrgyzstan) Walnut forest in the Jalal-Abad province (Kyrgyzstan)
The walnut forest is remnants of Central Asia Tertiary era subtropical forests. They are located primarily in the northern slopes of the Ferghana and Chatkal ranges of the Tien Shan and on the southern slopes of the Gissar and Darvaz ranges in Tajikistan. The Jalal-Abad walnut forests is currently under risk of man made damage due to wood fuel cutting, cattle grazing and land cultivating. The forest consists of a remarkable combination of walnut...
16 Mar 2006 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
2
Environment and Security Initiative : Today`s priorities and future challenges Environment and Security Initiative : Today`s priorities and future challenges
The pilot phase of the initiative in 2003 assessed environmental threats in Central Asia and South –Eastern Europe, two regions where environmental concerns have clear security implications. The Southern Caucasus joined in 2004. Eastern Europe and the Circumpolar Arctic will be included in 2005-2006. In each region work stats by identifying, through consultation with national and regional stakeholders, priority environment and security issues and...
16 Mar 2006 - by Viktor Novikov and Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Water withdrawal and availability in Aral Sea basin Water withdrawal and availability in Aral Sea basin
Agriculture is a mainstay of Central Asia’s economy. With the economic crisis following independence it has become even more important. Agriculture being almost entirely dependent upon irrigation, access to water is of strategic importance. Two major Tributaries – The Naryn and the Kara-Darya – both originating in Kyrgyzstan, join to form the Syr-Darya, one of the two largest rivers serving the Aral Sea Basin, and the key water resource of the wh...
16 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
5
Topography and hydrography of the Ferghana Valley Topography and hydrography of the Ferghana Valley
To date there are three main groups of issues that are relevant to environmental and security issues in the region. These are access to and quality if natural resources (primarily water and land but also forest and more generally biodiversity resources), existing or potential pollution from industrial facilities, hazardous and radioactive waste sites; and cross-cutting issues such as natural disasters, climate change, public health, environmenta...
03 Oct 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
5
Gross National Income (GNI) kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan Gross National Income (GNI) kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan
The rationale of the common soviet market and economic system has disappeared, forcing Central Asian states to find their own position in the global market without the support of a redistributive economy. Their geographical position landlocked between two economic and political giants, china and Russia, makes their task difficult, especially in poor countries. All three economies are predominantly agricultural. They all rely on primary exports, e...
16 Mar 2006 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Trends in regional average surface temperature in the Ferghana Valley area Trends in regional average surface temperature in the Ferghana Valley area
An important factor when looking at the region in terms of environment and security is the impact of climate change in Central Asia in general, and Ferghana Valley in particular. By modifying people’s livelihood, climate change may have an important security dimension in conjunction with other aggravating factors. In the Ferghana valley it is likely that climate change will primarily affect sector related to water and agriculture. Central Asia is...
16 Mar 2006 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Population distribution in the Ferghana valley Population distribution in the Ferghana valley
Given the importance of agriculture for the whole Ferghana basin, natural resources such as land and water have historically been amongst the most important factor in this regions development. The size of the population depending upon these resources is consequently a key political security, and environmental issue. The Ferghana valley is the most populous area in Central Asia. High population densities increase the risk of depletion of natural r...
16 Mar 2006 - by Dominique del Pietro and Diana Rizzolio
3
Water issues in the Ferghana Valley Water issues in the Ferghana Valley
Water is a basic production resource for agriculture. Competition for scarce water resources has been recognized as a potential source of international conflict. In the case of the Ferghana Valley, despite the very local character of the conflicts, the presence of international borders/or the implication of communities belonging to another ethnic group has loaded the conflict with a transborder and/or ethnic dimension. Earlier studies have shown ...
16 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Industrial pollution and waste hotspots in the Ferghana Valley Industrial pollution and waste hotspots in the Ferghana Valley
Mercury mining, uranium mining, chemical and textile industries, oil facilities and processing plants which contribute to the contamination of the soil with highly toxic heavy metals are recognized as environmental challenges in the region. Even though past spills and contaminations have caused tensions between the different countries of the region, officials do not consistently regard environmental pollution by existing facilities as a security ...
16 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Trends in permafrost temperatures and active-layer thickness, Northern Tien Shan mountains Trends in permafrost temperatures and active-layer thickness, Northern Tien Shan mountains
Mountain permafrost in Central Asia occupies approximately 3.5 million square kilometers and makes up about 15 per cent of the total permafrost area in the Northern Hemisphere. The climatic variations during the 20th century and especially during the last two decades have impacted current permafrost temperatures. In the Tien Shan Mountains, Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, and western Mongolian sector of the Altai Mountains, observations over the last 30 ...
01 Jun 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Shrinking of Fedchenko Glacier in the Pamirs of Tajikistan Shrinking of Fedchenko Glacier in the Pamirs of Tajikistan
Significant loss of glaciers in Central Asia began around the 1930s, and become more dramatic in the second half of the 20th century and continue into the 21st century. Glacier area was reduced in the Tien Shan and in the Pamirs, including its largest Fedchenko Glacier. The debris-covered glacier tongue retreated by more than 1 km since 1933 and lowered by about 50 m since 1980.
01 Jun 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Major mineral fuel resources in Europe, Caucasus and Central Asia Major mineral fuel resources in Europe, Caucasus and Central Asia
Mineral fuels for electricity and heat generation take primarily two forms: fossil fuels in the form of oil, natural gas and coal, and uranimum ore for nuclear power. Oil and gas are distributed in different belts, primarily in the North Sea, Caucasus and Northern Russia. Coal in different forms is still an important fuel resource and resources are distributed over the region. Uranium resources are primarily in Ukraine and Central Asia.
20 Jul 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
5
Landcover - Europe and Central Asia Landcover - Europe and Central Asia
The Western part of the Eurasian continent, has some of the most populated and fertile parts of the World. Central Europe is densely populated, with few remaining fragments of undisturbed habitat, except for the mountain ranges. In the north - Scandinavia and Northern Russia, there is the taiga belt, with vast expanses of confierous forest, and further north, there is tundra and glaciers. Central Asia and Caucasus is a diverse region, with desert...
20 Jul 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Renewable energy production in Europe and Central Asia 2004 (heat production and electricity generation) Renewable energy production in Europe and Central Asia 2004 (heat production and electricity generation)
Hydropower, generation of electricity from dams in rivers, represents the majority of the energy produced, so far, with waste incineration - both from municipal and industrial sources, as a distant second. Other energy sources, such as biomass, windpower and solar power represents a very little share of the renewable energy produced so far. Energy consumption has been increasing in the region, since the 1990s, and with it the emissions of greenho...
20 Jul 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Shrinking of Fedchenko Glacier in the Pamirs of Tajikistan Shrinking of Fedchenko Glacier in the Pamirs of Tajikistan
Significant loss of glaciers in Central Asia began around the 1930s, and become more dramatic in the second half of the 20th century and continue into the 21st century. Glacier area was reduced in the Tien Shan and in the Pamirs, including its largest Fedchenko Glacier. The debris-covered glacier tongue retreated by more than 1 km since 1933 and lowered by about 50 m since 1980.
01 Jun 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Contamination in Central Asia's Ferghana-Osh-Khudjand area Contamination in Central Asia's Ferghana-Osh-Khudjand area
No data
28 Mar 2006 - by Bounford.com and UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Dissolved phosphate levels: concentrations at river mouths Dissolved phosphate levels: concentrations at river mouths
Phosphorus is naturally present in water, primarily as inorganic and organic phosphates. Phosphates can enter aquatic environments in several ways: from the natural weathering of minerals in the drainage basin, from biological decomposition, or as runoff from human activity in urban and agricultural areas. A comparison of the major watersheds between the two decades showed that northern Europe and North America had lower phosphate concentrations...
26 Jan 2009 - by Phillippe Rekacewicz, February 2006
3
The disappearance of the Aral Sea The disappearance of the Aral Sea
The demise of the Aral Sea in central Asia was caused primarily by the diversion of the inflowing Amu Dar’ya and Syr Dar’ya rivers to provide irrigation water for local croplands. These diversions dramatically reduced the river inflows, causing the Aral Sea to shrink by more than 50%, to lose two-thirds of its volume, and to greatly increase its salinity. At the current rate of decline, the Aral Sea has the potential to disappear completely by 20...
26 Jan 2009 - by GRIDA
5
Tigris and Euphrates rivers fragmentation Tigris and Euphrates rivers fragmentation
It has been predicted that access to water will create conflict between countries. In Africa, central Asia, west Asia and the Americas, some countries are already arguing fiercely over access to rivers and inland seas, and confrontations could arise as water shortages grow (Gleick, 2000). Countries currently or potentially involved in international disputes over access to river water and aquifers include: - Turkey, Syria and Iraq (the Tigris and...
26 Jan 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz
2
Previous | 1 2 3 4 5 | Next