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Cultivated Land in Aral Sea Region [Russian] Cultivated Land in Aral Sea Region [Russian]
Between 1990 and 2000 the area of cultivated land per capita in the Aral Sea region has dramatically reduced. The predictive models to the year 2020 show the increase demand in irrigation of the region. In Russian.
14 Feb 2006 - by I. Atamuradova, V. Yemelin, P. Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Cultivated Land in Aral Sea Region Cultivated Land in Aral Sea Region
Between 1990 and 2000 the area of cultivated land per capita in the Aral Sea region has dramatically reduced. The predictive models to the year 2020 show the increase demand in irrigation of the region.
14 Feb 2006 - by I. Atamuradova, V. Yemelin, P. Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Energy consumption in Central Asia [Russian] Energy consumption in Central Asia [Russian]
Industry in Central Asia consumes two hundred to three hundred more energy than in Western Europe. The levels of productivity based on consumption of electricity and gross domestic product is noticeably lower in Central Asia with Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan being the worst at energy consumption. In Russian.
14 Feb 2006 - by I. Atamuradova, V. Yemelin, P. Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Aral Sea: Chances of Survival Aral Sea: Chances of Survival
The Aral Sea is shrinking at an alarming rate and the amount of consumption of water in the Aral Sea Basin has greatly affected current conditions. This shows predicted models of water problems in the Aral Sea.
14 Feb 2006 - by I. Atamuradova, V. Yemelin, P. Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Biodiveristy in Central Asia [Russian] Biodiveristy in Central Asia [Russian]
Caspian and Balkhash endemic species are under threat of extinction. It is estimated that ten percent of total area needs to be protected in order to sustain development and the countries of the region are seriously behind that benchmark. In Russian.
14 Feb 2006 - by I. Atamuradova, V. Yemelin, P. Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Environment in Central Asia Environment in Central Asia
There are 25 billion tonnes of waste just from mining and metal production in Central Asia. The most effected areas are highlighted based on a variety of different types of environmental damage such as desertification and wind erosion.
14 Feb 2006 - by I. Atamuradova, V. Yemelin, P. Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Energy consumption in Central Asia Energy consumption in Central Asia
Industry in Central Asia consumes two hundred to three hundred more energy than in Western Europe. The levels of productivity based on consumption of electricity and gross domestic product is noticeably lower in Central Asia with Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan being the worst at energy consumption.
14 Feb 2006 - by I. Atamuradova, V. Yemelin, P. Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Health in Central Asia Health in Central Asia
Central Asia has a very high infant mortality rate and many other major health problems. This graphic shows some of the main causes of death as well as infant mortality and life expectancy rates for the region.
14 Feb 2006 - by I. Atamuradova, V. Yemelin, P. Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Central Asia: political transition and environmental risks Central Asia: political transition and environmental risks
The Environment and Security consultations in Ashgabat in 2003 pinpointed the Ferghana valley as an area of significant concern in Central Asia (UNEP, UNDP, OSCE 2003) The graphic shows the priority geographic areas and thematic issues for possible ENVSEC action in this area
16 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Environment and Security priority areas in the Ferghana Valley Environment and Security priority areas in the Ferghana Valley
The graphic shows an outline of the areas within the Ferghana Valley which are subjects to disputes over water resources and borders, disputes between private and collective farmers, deforestation and overuse of pasture. The map also show areas of industrial pollution and chemical risks caused by badly maintained radioactive dumps, tailing containments and several working industrial facilities.
16 Mar 2006 - by Viktor Novikov and Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Climate change and natural disaster impacts in the Ferghana Valley Climate change and natural disaster impacts in the Ferghana Valley
Central Asia is a disaster-prone area, exposed to various natural hazards such as floods, droughts, avalanches, rockslide and earthquakes. It is also vulnerable to man-made disasters related to industrial activity and the radioactive and chemical dumps inherited from the Soviet period. Several factors - population density in disaster-prone areas, high overall population growth, poverty, land and water use, failure to comply with building codes an...
16 Mar 2006 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Causual pathway of conflict over resources Causual pathway of conflict over resources
For violence to occur there should be someone able to extract economic profit from the situation. Access to specific natural resources is a factor that can motivate actors to use violence as means of control (diamonds, oil, timber wars) When looking at the process behind violence it is essential to identify players with an incentive for violence. They need to access resources that facilitate mobilization and expansion of violence. However, societ...
16 Mar 2006 - by Luigi de Martino and Viktor Novikov
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Radioactive, chemical and biological hazards in Central Asia Radioactive, chemical and biological hazards in Central Asia
The Soviet development model for Central Asia was based on building large-scale irrigation schemes enabling the region to become a major cotton producer and expanding the mining and processing industry. Industrial operations in the region paid little attention to the environment and public health, resulting in the accumulation of pollutants in the local environment. Today, not only active industrial facilities constitute a threat to environment, ...
16 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Land issues in the Ferghana valley Land issues in the Ferghana valley
The high demographic pressure on limited land resources coincides with a lack of jobs and economic prospects especially in marginalized areas but increasingly in the irrigated areas of Uzbekistan. These factors are triggering population movements to urban centers and the relatively less populated rural areas in the region.
16 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Oblasts in the Ferghana Valley area Oblasts in the Ferghana Valley area
One important outcome of the ENVSEC consultations in Osh in 2004 has been the re- establishment of communication between environmental authorities from the oblasts of the three countries constituting the Ferghana Valley. Environmental authorities within every region every day face common problems and challenges, but also every day their managers experience challenges of direct cross-border communication.
16 Mar 2006 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Hazardous industrial waste in Kadamjai Hazardous industrial waste in Kadamjai
The Kadamjai antimony plant in southern Kyrgyzstan stands close to the Uzbek border and the town of the same name. The plant annually consumes 20 000 tones of ore. Ore waste dumps are exposed to erosion by rain and wind – resulting in contamination of soil and water resources by pollutants.
16 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Population density in the Ferghana Valley province Population density in the Ferghana Valley province
Given the importance of agriculture for the whole Ferghana basin, natural resources such as land and water have historically been amongst the most important factor in this regions development. The size of the population depending upon these resources is consequently a key political security, and environmental issue. The Ferghana valley is the most populous area in Central Asia. High population densities increase the risk of depletion of natural r...
31 Oct 2006 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Population trends for Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan Population trends for Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan
Output by the Central Asian economies dropped sharply after independence with subsequent fall in living conditions. Poverty is widespread, especially in rural areas. Communal services have broken down in many areas, straining relations between local authorities and the population. Only recently have some of the economies shown signs of improving, but GDP growth rates have not helped to reduce poverty and social inequality. The unemployment rates ...
16 Mar 2006 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Radioactive waste in Taboshar Radioactive waste in Taboshar
The Taboshar uranium mining site stands on the southern edge of the Kuramin Mountains close the Uzbek - Tajik border. The site consists of a non - rehabilitated open mine, dismantled production buildings, and three tailing sites storing 10 m tones of low grade processed uranium ore. The town of Taboshar with its 12000 inhabitants is only a few kilometers away.
16 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Rising water levels in the Spitamen district (Tajikistan) Rising water levels in the Spitamen district (Tajikistan)
Sudden releases of water into the Spitamen district from Kyrgyzstan are regularly endangering the neighboring Tajik arable land downstream and villages along the river. The Tajik communities are convinced upstream Kyrgyz communities are responsible for the flooding. However, local experts suggest that increased water levels in spring the later years may also be due to increased and rapid ice and snow melt down caused by a warmer climate in the hi...
16 Mar 2006 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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