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The Carbon Cycle The Carbon Cycle
Carbon stocks in forest areas comprise carbon in living and dead organic matter both above and below ground including trees, the understorey, dead wood, litter and soil. On a global scale, vegetation and soils are estimated to trap 2.6 gigatonnes (Gt) of carbon annually. Yet there are still many uncertainties about the workings of the carbon cycle: the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) estimates that the amount of carbon...
20 Jun 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz assisted by Cecile Marin, Agnes Stienne, Guilio Frigieri, Riccardo Pravettoni, Laura Margueritte and Marion Lecoquierre.
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carbon_cycle carbon_cycle
About carbon_cycle
17 May 2005 - by Not specified
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The carbon cycle The carbon cycle
The global carbon cycle shows the carbon reservoirs in GtC (gigatonne= one thousand million tonnes) and fluxes in GtC/year. The indicated figures are annual averages over the period 1980 to 1989. The component cycles are simplified and the figures present average values. The riverine flux, particularly the anthropogenic portion, is currently very poorly quantified and is not shown here. Evidence is accumulating that many of the fluxes can fluct...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Projected changes in CO2 and climate: assumptions in the IPCC 1992 scenarios Projected changes in CO2 and climate: assumptions in the IPCC 1992 scenarios
Projected anthropogenic CO2 emissions from fossil fuel use, deforestation and cement production are shown for some of the IPCC emission scenarios. The highest emission scenario - IS92e - assumes moderate population growth, high economic growth, high fossil fuel availability, and a phase out of nuclear power; and the lowest emission scenario - IS92c - assumes low population growth, low economic growth, and severe constraints on fossil fuel suppli...
06 Nov 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Carbon cycle Carbon cycle
Carbon is the basis of all organic substances, from fossil fuels to human cells. On Earth, carbon is continually on the move – cycling through living things, the land, ocean, atmosphere. What happens when humans start driving the carbon cycle? We have seen that we can make a serious impact – rapidly raising the level of carbon in the atmosphere. But we really have no idea what we are doing. At the moment we don’t even know what happens to all the...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Historic CO2 emissions by region Historic CO2 emissions by region
Carbon cycle, carbon fluxes and stocks.
27 May 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Ocean carbon cycle Ocean carbon cycle
Without the contribution of oceans and coastal ecosystems to global biological carbon sequestration today’s CO2 concentration in the atmosphere would be much larger than it is. But the uptake capacity of oceans and coasts is both finite and vulnerable. Minimisation of pressures, restoration and sustainable use are management options that can help these ecosystems maintain their important carbon management function.
27 May 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Carbon cycle Carbon cycle
Living systems play a vital role in the carbon cycle. Photosynthesising organisms – mostly plants on land and various kinds of algae and bacteria in the sea – use either atmospheric carbon dioxide or that dissolved in sea water as the basis for the complex organic carbon compounds that are essential for life.
27 May 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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The Carbon cycle The Carbon cycle
The figures indicate carbon storage and flows, expressed in Gigatonnes (1 000 million tonnes) of carbon. The arrows are proportionate to the volume of carbon. The figures for the flows express amounts exchanged annually.
05 Jan 2009 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Carbon Cycle Carbon Cycle
Blue and green carbon process.Oceans are crucial in the global carbon cycle. It was here where life first evolved; they are the source of our wealth and development. The living oceans capture over half of all the Green carbon – the carbon bound by living organisms through photosynthesis.
06 Oct 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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